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Hebrew University
Hebrew University law courses made to change Israel to a non-Jewish state during academic years 2008/9 and 2009/10

Hebrew University courses made to change Israel to a non-Jewish state, financed by Ford Foundation. Below student's personal stories taken from Mahapach-Taghir website and then 2008-9 and 2009-10 courses list:

http://www.mahapach-taghir.org/node/156

Day seminar in east Jerusalem

During June, the students of Kattamonim and Kiryat-Yovel communities took part in a day seminar regarding East-Jerusalem. The day included an alternative tour in east-Jerusalem (held by The Israeli Committee Against House Demolitions), and discussions with residents.

We started off at the ICAHD office, learning about the situation at the east side of the city. Then, we went on to the tour in Silwan, one of the Palestinian neighborhoods in east Jerusalem. There we've meet with parents, who taught us about the education problems in east Jerusalem. The tour ended in the refugee camp Anata, where we've meet with residents.

The day was enlightening, and raised burning questions which keep echoing in our minds until this day.

Click here to see photos from the event.

http://www.mahapach-taghir.org/node/130

Activists Seminar in Peqiin – a Personal Experience

When I invited my friends to join the Activists Seminar in Peqiin, they responded with sayings like "but I'm not an activist" or "what dose activist means?". And so I began to think: am I an "activist"? And what does this big word truly means to me?

 

Some 200 man and woman from across the country, Jewish and Arabs come to the seminar. It was originally thought of four years ago, by 15 students active in Mahapach-Tagir, who wanted to promote co-learning about social and environmental issues and to encourage cooperation among others how want to promote change. So what does the meaning of this co-learning? I once assumed that those seminars are a place where people who already agree with each other, meat to talk about subject that they already familiar with. I discovered that when a person brings his own knowledge and experience, we can argue, change our personal conventions and come out of it with new insight about the world. Most important, you can think, by yourself of with others, about how to make life around here a bit more meaningful – instead of whine, to talk about it and maybe even do something about it.

Each day of the seminar was consist out of 10 rounds of activities and lectures, held simultaneously about different subjects. Each participant was asked to chose a lecture or activity according to his\her own interest: from building compost out of lumber and cigarettes, to increasing awareness to social involvement in the media. There were movies, lectures and activities carried out by professional and students, new initiatives such as soul-performance from Horfiesh and circus of Jews and Arabs youth from the Galil. Every day there were tours in Peqiin that included meetings with residents from the area.

The activities were interesting and also fury-raising. I've learned about the history of oppression in the country, about the media, about the Druze community and about the recent incidents in Peqiin. I saw a movie by 'Breaking the Silent' and learned to look especially about that the things I'm not been told about, and why there are 'black holes' in out knowledge. The different activities refined my understanding that there is always a man with an interest, and that everything has a broader social-cultural connection. I learned, listened and got angry. Mostly, I found out how much I don’t know. I wondered if all those emotions meant 'activism': Was I an activist? Have I changed anything?

I like to say I have, that I promoted Jewish-Arab partnership, that I've initiate projects and got to the headlines. Unfortunately, it didn't happened, but I was encouraged to keep on learning, to change my consciousness and that of those around my. Apparently, this is where 'activism' starts, in the will of being active and to refuse to accept thing as they are. During the seminar, a few students from Tel-Hai College had the idea of creating 'activist cells' of students in the academic institutes across Israel. To keep on learning; so that eventually, the fury will raise so high, that we would have to do something in order to change it.

The first meeting of the 'Tel-Hai activist cell' will take place on the 31st of May, at the student club in the east campus. I would like to invite each and every one how wants to be active in his/her own life. The goal is to learn about meaningful subject – to empower and to expose knowledge. Even if all you want to do is to find out what 'activism' means, came and talk about what ever makes you happy or annoyed – it might just bother some of us enough to actually do something about it.

Tal Gadot

 

 

 

http://law.huji.ac.il/upload/courses(1).doc

courses that integrate student action for

social change, social justice and human rights

 

2008/9 academic year

 

Dr. Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian

Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Course title: Gender and Human Rights – Between Criminology, Victimology and Social Action

Fourteen students enrolled in this innovative course, jointly offered by the School of Social Work and the Criminology Department at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and taught by Dr. Katalin Katz and Dr. Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian. The course integrates theoretical study of human rights advocacy methods and critical concepts with four hours of volunteering at a range of governmental and non-governmental organizations, including the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, the Jerusalem municipality, the Israel Association for Child Protection, Elem – Youth in Distress, and more. Some of the projects in which the students are involved include: workshops for women on sexual rights, coordination of a coalition of organizations on the protection of children on the internet, advocacy for Sudanese refugees, and more.

 

Dr. Haim Yacobi

Department of Politics and Government, Ben Gurion University

Course title: Human Rights, Community, and Planning Policy in Israel

Twelve students are enrolled in this course, offered by the politics and government department at Ben Gurion University in Beer Sheva and taught by Dr. Haim Yacobi. The course highlights the connection between human rights as a concept and a tool for social change, and planning policy as a practice engaged in organization of space and allocation of resources. In addition to their coursework, students volunteer for at least five hours a week at a human rights or social justice organization, culminating in an analysis or policy document that they write for the organization. The course places special emphasis on disadvantaged communities in the south of Israel and issues of employment, environment, and health.

 

Dr. Tamar Hagar, Adv. Yael Efron, Tufaha Saba and Nava Shay

Department of Education, Tel-Hai Academic College

Course title: Education With a View Towards the Community

Fourteen students are enrolled in this program at Tel Hai College's education department in Israel's far north, taught by Dr. Tamar Hagar. The program includes four courses: Education and the community; Critical thought, gender and activism; Human rights – leadership and change; and Jewish-Arab dialogue. In addition to these academic courses, students volunteer for four hours a week at formal and informal educational initiatives, including a new community center for the Southern Lebanese community in Kiryat Shmone, the Tel Hai center for developing readiness for higher education among disadvantaged groups, a project for helping women in Kiryat Shmone find employment facilitated by the Yedid organization, a kindergarten for autistic children, and more.

 

Dr. Dalya Markovich 

Informal Education Track, Beit Berl College

Course title: Education and Social Change

Twelve students are enrolled in this course, taught by Dr. Dalya Markovitch of Beit Berl College's school of education. Students study the Israeli educational system as a potential arena for civic activism, community work, and working towards equality. Each student volunteers for four hours a week at one of a range of organizations, including shelters for battered women in the Jewish and Arab sectors, Elem, an organization for youth in distress, Mahapach-Taghir, which works to minimize educational and social gaps in Israeli society, and more. A central goal of the course is to create a bridge between the informal educational system and active civic engagement.

 

Eldad Cidour, Lea Mauas, Diego Rotman and Eytan Shouker

Bezalel – Academy of Art and Design

Course title: Art and Activism

This popular course at the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design is taught by Eytan Shouker, Eldad Cidor, Lea Mauas and Diego Rotman. Between 20 and 32 students will be enrolled in the course this year. Throughout the year the students study the work of artist activists, discuss art in the social, political and economic contexts, and meet local organizations, activists, and artists. In the summer, each student devotes approximately 180 hours to developing a new or ongoing project in conjunction with a local community. Examples of such projects include creating areas for meeting and leisure in the village of Issawiah through recycling projects, building a platform for open conversation between city residents in the center of Jerusalem, and planning and developing a park in an area that was initially designated as a major road.

 

Prof. Daoud Bshouty, Dr. Igor Verner and Khiria Massarwe

Faculty of Education in Technology and Science, Technion – Israel Institute of Technology

Course title: Teaching Geometry in Social and Cultural Context

Eight students are enrolled in this course, offered by the Dept. of Education in Technology and Science at the Technion – Israel Institute of Technology, and taught by Dr. Igor Verner and Prof. Daoud Bashouty of the Technion's faculty of mathematics. In the course students study and experience geometry teaching through geometric patterns of cultural significance. Students study Indian, Aztec, Ancient Roman, Jewish, Muslim and Christian geometric art and how such art can be used to teach geometry. In addition to their studies, students volunteer for four hours a week teaching and creating geometric art with Jewish and Arab students, to increase young people's interest in studying geometry, and to promote inter-cultural understanding through geometry and art.

 

Adv. Dana Myrtenbaum, Odette Falach and Dr. Noya Rimalt

Faculty of Law, Haifa University

Course title: Legal Feminism and Social Change

This course, offered by the law faculty at Haifa University, is jointly taught by Dr. Sagit Mor, Adv. Dana Myrtenbaum and psychologist Odette Falah. The course is a year-long program targeting community leaders and law students, which teaches legal theory, legal feminism and human rights, methods of effecting social change, and more, in order to identify and serve the needs of women in Israel in the legal and public sphere. The program encourages the creation of partnerships between law students and community activists ("legal leaders") and promotes a variety of projects, including creating and operating a center for the promotion of Ethiopian women's and girls' rights; a project that aims to make family courts more accessible to Arab and Jewish women, a project that aims to make higher education more accessible to Druze women, a project that aims to raise awareness of polygamy and the marriage of young girls in Arab society, and more.

 

Adv. Sharon Sionov Arad

Faculty of Law, Hebrew Unviersity of Jerusalem

Course title: Legal Clinic for Representation of Youth

19 students are enrolled in this course, which is offered by the Law Faculty at Hebrew University and taught by attorneys Sharon Zionov, Reut Rosner and Shiran Reichenberg. Through this course law students gain practical experience in represting youth and in providing legal aid and representation. Students study a range of topics including legal aspects in the lives of children and youth, how bureaucratic systems treat young people, how social gaps and inequality affect the lives of youth, children and young people as a disadvantaged group, international aspects of children's rights, and more. Students commit to working at the clinic between 6-10 hours a week, staffing the clinic, providing representation, conducting workshops and marketing the clinic to young people. The clinic works with a range of social organizations as well as with governmental and non-governmental agencies and the Israeli courts.

 

Prof. Miriam Shlesinger and Michal Schuster

Department of Translation and Interpreting Studies, Bar-Ilan University

Course title: Community Interpreting

25 students are enrolled in this course, offered by department of translation and interpreting studies at Bar Ilan University and taught by Prof. Michal Schlesinger and Ms. Michal Schuster. Eighteen of the students are native Arabic speakers, four are Russian speakers, two speak Amharic, and one speaks Spanish. The objectives of the course are varied: First, it aims to raise public awareness of the importance of making public services and institutions accessible to members of minority language communities. Second, it attempts to help minority communities access these services, and third, it aims to teach the students the meaning of a language gap and how it impacts personal and collective identity in Israel. The students volunteer at a range of locations, including hospitals, clinics, prisons, social service agencies and municipalities, and more.

 

Dr. Daphna Golan

Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Course title: Human Rights in Israeli Society

15 students from a range of disciplines are enrolled in this program sponsored by the Minerva Center for Human Rights at Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and directed by Dr. Daphna Golan Agnon. This program aims to enhance awareness of human rights among university students, to educate a new generation of human rights activists, and to expose them to recent academic research in this area. In addition, the Program allows its participants to experience the inner workings of human rights organizations by devoting approximately 320 hours per academic year to volunteering at a human rights organization. Among the organizations that have hosted Minerva fellows are Bizchut  - The Center for the Human Rights of People with Disabilities; Physicians for Human Rights; Kav La’Oved – The Worker’s Hotline; Adalah, the Legal Cneter for Arab Minority Rights in Israel, the National Council for the Child, the Israel Association for Ethiopian Jews, B’tselem, and Amnesty International – Israel Section.

 

Dr. Yousef Jabareen and Dr. Ilan Saban

Faculty of Law, Haifa University

course title: Rights of the Palestinian Arab Minority in Israel

Dr. Michael Klinghoffer

Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance

course title: The Artist as an Agent of Change

Dr. Edith Blit-Cohen

School of Social Work, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Course title: Marginalized Populations, Human Rights and Social Change

 

Haggith Gor Ziv, Galia Zalmanson Levi and Gal Harmat

Center for Critical Pedagogy and Education for Social Justice, Kibbutzim College of Education

Course title: Education for Social Justice, Environmental Justice and Peace Education

 

Dr. Ariela Bairey Ben Ishay and Moti Gigi

Public Policy and Public Administration Department, Sapir College

Course title: Leadership and Social Change – Awareness and Initiative in Public Action

 

 
 
 
 

Courses that integrate student action for social change, social justice and human rights

 

 

2009/10 academic year

 

 

Adv. Dana Myrtenbaum, Noor Falach and Dr. Sagit Mor

Law School, the Haifa Legal Feminism Clinic, University of Haifa

Course title: Legal Feminism and Social Change

 

The program is a unique cooperation between the Haifa University’s Faculty of law and Itach-Maaki – Women Lawyers for Social Justice, a Jewish-Arab feminist legal advocacy organization. The program’s vision is to promote access to justice for women from disadvantaged communities and marginalized individuals, as well as to challenge the existing power structure in the legal world and its gender and cultural blindness. Through this unique program Jewish and Arab law students have the opportunity to openly and critically engage with questions of intergroup relations, power, and accessibility.

The program aspires to impact future lawyers by exposing Jewish and Arab law students at the University of Haifa to women’s struggles and strength, and to the power of the law in the process of social change. Along with the law students, a group of Arab and Jewish women from marginalized communities go through an empowerment process as they are trained to be “legal leaders” whose voices will be heard in the public sphere and who are committee to issues of gender and status shared by all marginalized Israeli women.

Pairing together women leaders and law students, the program’s participants act together in designing and implementing seed projects to enable marginalized voices of women and disempowered communities to be heard and seen by decision-makers, the legal system, courts, media, the general public and more. The model, co-coordinated by a Jewish attorney and an Arab-Druze psychologist, equips a multi-cultural group of women activists and law students with effective social change tools and guides them in their quest for long term social change.

Projects developed by the program include: empowering Arab and Jewish women in providing legal assistance by making accessible the Family Court in Haifa; promoting and advancing the rights of Arab-Druze women in the divorce process; construction of a rehabilitation program for women involved in prostitution and raising public awareness to their situation, and more.

 

Hagith Gor Ziv and Galia Zalmansson

Kibbutzim College of Education

Course title: Education for Social Justice, Environmental Justice and Peace Education

 

This teachers’ training program of four years for B.Ed aims at building the teachers’ capacity to educate children toward social justice and peace, raising their awareness to gender inequalities and other forms of discrimination in education. The students practical training is performed in organizations for social change, and in schools at disadvantaged communities, including Jewish-Arab student activist organization Mahapach-Taghir, Arab-Jewish projects in Jaffa, and the Jewish and Arab Women’s Association in Rosh Ha’Ayin. Students are required to implement ideas of alternative education, and innovative relevant pedagogy for children from marginalized groups.

The group of students participating in the program reflects in itself the various segments of Israeli society and provides an unparalleled space for intergroup dialogue – Palestinian and Jewish, migrant workers, disabled students, young and old, from the center and from the periphery. Students speak seven different languages and affiliate with four religions. The program offers courses on Israeli society, human rights and children’s’ rights, gender equality, critical pedagogy, and more. In addition the students specialize in one educational discipline – math, science, literature and language and Jewish and Arab culture. They are taught how to integrate social justice and peace education into the existing required curricula.

 

Dr. Ariela Bairey, Dr. Daniel Malach, and Moti Gigi

Dept. of Public Policy and Administration, Sapir Academic College, Sderot

Course title: Leadership and Social Change: Awareness and Initiative in Public Action

 

This course deals with two main issues, on both theoretical and practical-experiential levels: individual and social change in a diverse and changing society, and social initiative and leadership. The course exposes the students to mainstream and innovative approaches to leadership as social action that occurs in a historical, social and political context. The course examines leadership as a process that takes place from the bottom-up and laterally, and not only from the top-down. This approach allows every individual in the room to actively examine his or her ethnic and national identities and take responsibility for who they are as members of their social and political environments. Students learn to use their strengths, privileges and shortcomings as they better understand their role in either perpetuating or interrupting social processes, and learn to take action as conscious and responsible agents of social change.

The method of instruction is engaged-critical pedagogy, in which students are challenged to read diverse theoretical approaches, respond to them and interact actively with each other on intellectual-cognitive and personal-emotional levels. As students participate in eh course and are active in organizations for social justice and human rights, the course staff offers a forum for reflection in action, within which consciousness, awareness and action are encouraged as a flexible process of orchestrating group resources, as processes of individual and social change are underway.

 

Prof. Miriam Shlesinger and Michal Schuster

Dept. of Translation and Interpreting Studies, Bar Ilan University

Course title: Community Interpreting

 

The course in community interpreting trains bilingual students to leverage their knowledge of a second language for the benefit of those who have difficulty accessing various public services because they do not speak Hebrew. It addresses such issues as the role of language in creating – and reducing – power imbalances, the ethics of intercultural mediation, advocacy and empowerment, and the rights o language minorities in a multilingual society.

Students – speakers of Arabic, Russian, Amharic, Spanish, French and English (in addition to Hebrew) – spend 4 hours each week volunteering as language mediators (translator/interpreters). Their assignments vary widely and include hospitals (primarily mediating between Arabic-speaking patients, many of them from Gaza, and the medical staff); rehabilitational facilities (assisting therapists in diagnosing and treating children who have undergone trauma); NGOs (such as Physicians for Human Rights); well baby clinics; immigration center; and municipal services and social security offices. The students’ language skills are curial in easing tension in these very charged settings and promote an understanding of the importance of language access, while enhancing public awareness of language in the context of human rights. Importantly, the course brings together students from a variety of backgrounds, many of whom have never been exposed to the other before. As a result the students undergo an intense process of tolerance building, understanding, and transformation of previously hostile relationships.

 

Dr. Dalya Markovich and Asmhan Hazrallah

School of Education, Beit Berl College

Course title: Education and Social Change

 

 

The course aims to form a connection between the field of non-formal education and active civic engagement. It discussed the non-formal education field as a potential sphere for civic activism and social change, and the different ways in which non-formal education leverages diverse social action and human rights. The experience in the field is designed to provide students with tools and skills for civic activism. The theoretical and practical study is intended to reflect and analyze some of the dilemmas, contradictions and new horizons characterizing this distinct sphere.

The classroom consists of Jewish and Palestinian faculty and students, who through joint action and study throughout the year learn to bridge over initial differences and work together towards a common goal.

 

Dr. Yousef Jabareen and Dr. Ilan Saban

Faculty of Law, University of Haifa

Course title: Rights of the Palestinian Arab Minority in Israel

 

The course examines the legal status of the Arab citizens of Israel, and questions the capacity of the law to serve s a tool for social change. Its framework creates a setting for Arab-Jewish student partnership, modeled by the course lecturers. Students in the course create Arab and Jewish work teams. Student intern and aid six human rights organizations advancing the status of the Palestinian minority in Israel.

The faculty members, course coordinator and representatives of the organizations outline students’ projects in advance, to ensure that they address key issues, while the course aims to imitate at least one independent project annually. Students in the course have been assisting in the preparation of an appeal regarding the conditions for admittance to institutions of higher education. Today, universities and colleges require an arbitrary minimal age that predominantly discriminates against Arab citizens. A team of students has been working on the preparation of an appeal regarding profiling in public places, which results in discrimination based on nationality. Other teams have been working to connect school sin the unrecognized villages of the Negev to electricity and running water, and have begun to draft an appeal regarding discrimination practices in acceptance to newly established community settlements in the Negev.

 

Orly Kuzin-Malachi and Shiran Reichenberg

Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Course title: Feminism, Accessibility and the Law

 

The course examines the conditions of marginalized women in various sectors of Israeli society, their legal status as workers, mothers, single mothers and partners, and in legal, feminist, and marginalization theories. Israeli society is diverse and consists of groups with varying characteristics and traditions. Many women come from traditional backgrounds which is reflected in their status in religious costs. The course will examine the connections between knowledge, accessibility to law, marginal communities and social rights, and the direct and indirect obstacles that women and girls face when seeking to exercise their rights. The course will study various groups of marginalized women: in Islamic polygamy, the traditional Arab family and society in East Jerusalem, the family structure of the Ethiopian community, and the ultra-Orthodox Jewish community. Students will volunteer six hors a week at shelters for girls, social welfare agencies in East Jerusalem, employment agencies for Arab women, battered women shelters for Arab women, and more.

Jewish and Arab law students will initiate and pursue community work with marginalized women and girls through conducting empowerment workshops and development of a community project. Jewish and Arab women from marginalized communities will be hosted at the Hebrew University Campus to expose them to the academic environment.

 

Prof. Rachel Kallus and Dr. Emily Silverman

Technion – Israel Institute of Technology

Course title: Planning with the Community: Concepts, Tools and Strategies for Action

 

This course examines community planning as a tool for social change. It rests on the assumption that planning is not just a government tool but a framework for social action with substantial effects on creation of community and forming their identity, status, and lifestyle. The course focuses on planning with the community, in contrast to the mainstream attitude of planning for the community. Planning is therefore taught as a means of mediating between people and their surroundings, and especially for people from marginalized communities, as a means to deal with social gaps and inequality. Some questions that the course raises are: what is progressive social planning and how does it promote social change? How can planners and architects effectively combat social gaps and inequality and promote marginalized communities? How can planners work together with civil society organizations? What tools do planners and architects need to lead processes of social change?

The course is open to students in urban planning, architecture, landscape architecture, and civil and environmental engineering. Students will volunteer for sixty hours each semester with civil society organizations in Haifa that promote the rights of the Arab sector in Haifa, marginalized women, poor populations, and Palestinians in Jaffa.

 

Senan Abd-Elkader and Yael Padan

School of Architecture, Bezalel Academy of Art and Design

Course title: The unit for (in)formal architecture studies

 

One of the central features of Israel’s built landscape is informal construction, that circumvents the legal, planning, and execution requirements of formal building. Such a phenomenon is typical of marginalized populations globally, who for various reasons are barred from using the accepted system. The unit for (in)formal architecture studies examines these phenomena and its effect on the landscape of our lives. We are interested in how such construction expresses the relationships between the powerful and the powerless. The objective of the course is to train future architects who are aware of the existence and complexity of the informal building phenomenon. Students will aim to create meaningful architecture through dialogue with Palestinian residents of East Jerusalem in consideration of the social and cultural complexity of the existing built landscape. The course will be conducted in cooperation with Bimkom – Planners for Planning Rights, and the legal clinic at Al-Kuds University.

 

Prof. Ariella Friedman and Abeer Halabi

Department of Behavioral Sciences, Safed College

Course title: Strengthening the Welfare of Women through Awareness and Empowerment

 

The course will focus on the empowerment of women – both female students and women in crisis. The course will cover various forms of crises including poverty, violence, disease, sexual harassment and abuse, low social status, and psychological internalization of inequality. Almost all students in the classroom will be Palestinian women, and it will be jointly taught by a Jewish and a Palestinian woman. The course consists of three parts: first, a theoretical section in which students will read and discuss critical feminist literature and multicultural literature on women’s issues; second, self examination of students through group work and dialogue; and finally, the analysis of students’ own community service work, in which they will volunteer for four hours a week in Palestinian women’s organizations that combat sexual abuse, violence, poverty, and more.

 

Adv. Yuval Laster, Dr. Itay Fischhendler, and Prof. Yigal Erel

The Faculty of Law, the Department of Geography, and the Program for Environmental Studies at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Course title: Environmental Justice in a Trans-boundary Space

 

Environmental problems do not recognize manmade borders. Thus, despite the attempts to transfer many of Jewish West-Jerusalem’s environmental problems (e.g. waste dumps etc.) to Palestinian East Jerusalem, the problems have a grave impact on both sides. The objective of the course is twofold: to strengthen the conditions for cooperation and long term environmental planning across boundaries in Jerusalem and empowering marginalized stakeholders, while at the same time educating students for social responsibility and action through interdisciplinary use of scientific, planning, and legal tools. Through this joint work students from various disciplines can learn about each other’s strengths and limitations and lay the foundation for future cooperation. Students will be involved in projects that encourage alternatives for waste dumping and promote recycling, file lawsuits as necessary, work with planning groups at the Jerusalem municipality, meet with residents to document their needs, etc.

 

Dr. Roni Strier

School of Social Work, University of Haifa

Course title: Methods for Community Organizing: The Haifa Partnership for Combating Poverty

 

This course examines the community strategies to combat poverty and aims to create an equal partnership between the academy in the community. The course’s students, Palestinian and Jewish future social workers, work together with social workers, faculty, and diverse local populations in the multi-ethnic city of Haifa to combat poverty. The course employs a reflective methodology by looking critically at the relationship between the theory and practice of community work. Students discuss the issues that arise from experiencing community change at various levels. The objective of the course is to teach concepts, skills, and knowledge of community organizing, which is necessary for future social workers.

Students are involved in various neighborhood and municipal projects, in four areas selected together with local residents: the right to adequate housing, the right to education, water and electricity payments, and promotion of women’s rights. Students provide support to residents, recruit residents for the project, organize activities and vents and more. The project culminates in a report written by students together with local residents on the state of poverty in Haifa, and disseminated to decision makers and the general public.

 

Prof. Vered Slonim-Nevo and Yiftah Milo

School of Social Work, Ben Gurion University of the Negev

Course title: Refugee Issues in Israel and the World – Theory and Practical Training

 

The course is an interdisciplinary introduction to refugee issues in Israel and the world. It examines legal, political, historical, sociological and psychological issues related to refugees as expressed in Africa and in Israel and other Western countries. In addition, the course examines Israeli policy towards refugees and asylum seekers who come to Israel seeking protection. The course takes place on the university’s campus in the city of Eilat, home to 2500 asylum seekers, and is open to students in social work, behavioral sciences, sociology, tourism, and politics.

In addition to their theoretical study students work one day a week with refugee children and families in the city of Eilat. The course will be carried out in cooperation with civil society organizations providing aid and support to refugees.

 

Dr. Edith Blit-Cohen

School of Social Work, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Course title: Marginalized Populations, Human Rights and Social Change

 

This course deals with civil and social rights and the relationship between the violation of human rights and the creation of social exclusion, exploitation and oppression. During the course, the students examine the phenomenon of social exclusion among different groups. In addition, the course deals with different ways of combating social exclusion, such as community organizing, consciousness raising and social change. A special part of the course is dedicated to discussing the relevance and the role of social workers in creating responses for socially excluded persons at the different levels of intervention: the micro , the mezzo, and the macro level. Throughout the course, students become engaged with civil society organizations concerned with socio-economic gaps, with an emphasis on Jews and Palestinians in Israel.

 

Dr. Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian

Institute of Criminology, Faculty of Law, Hebrew University of Jerusalem

Course title: Gender and Human Rights – Between Criminology, Victimology and Social Action

 

Fourteen students enrolled in this innovative course, jointly offered by the School of Social Work and the Criminology Department at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem and taught by Dr. Katalin Katz and Dr. Nadera Shalhoub-Kevorkian. The course integrates theoretical study of human rights advocacy methods and critical concepts with four hours of volunteering at a range of governmental and non-governmental organizations, including the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, the Jerusalem municipality, the Israel Association for Child Protection, Elem – Youth in Distress, and more. Some of the projects in which the students are involved include: workshops for women on sexual rights, coordination of a coalition of organizations on the protection of children on the internet, advocacy for Sudanese refugees, and more.

 

Dr. Haim Yacobi

Department of Politics and Government, Ben Gurion University

Course title: Human Rights, Community, and Planning Policy in Israel

 

Twelve students are enrolled in this course, offered by the politics and government department at Ben Gurion University in Beer Sheva and taught by Dr. Haim Yacobi. The course highlights the connection between human rights as a concept and a tool for social change, and planning policy as a practice engaged in organization of space and allocation of resources. In addition to their coursework, students volunteer for at least five hours a week at a human rights or social justice organization, culminating in an analysis or policy document that they write for the organization. The course places special emphasis on disadvantaged communities in the south of Israel and issues of employment, environment, and health.

 

Dr. Tamar Hagar, Adv. Yael Efron, Tufaha Saba and Nava Shay

Department of Education, Tel-Hai Academic College

Course title: Education With a View Towards the Community

 

Fourteen students are enrolled in this program at Tel Hai College's education department in Israel's far north, taught by Dr. Tamar Hagar. The program includes four courses: Education and the community; Critical thought, gender and activism; Human rights – leadership and change; and Jewish-Arab dialogue. In addition to these academic courses, students volunteer for four hours a week at formal and informal educational initiatives, including a new community center for the Southern Lebanese community in Kiryat Shmone, the Tel Hai center for developing readiness for higher education among disadvantaged groups, a project for helping women in Kiryat Shmone find employment facilitated by the Yedid organization, a kindergarten for autistic children, and more.

 

Eldad Cidour, Lea Mauas, Diego Rotman and Eytan Shouker

Bezalel – Academy of Art and Design

Course title: Art and Activism

 

This popular course at the Bezalel Academy of Art and Design is taught by Eytan Shouker, Eldad Cidor, Lea Mauas and Diego Rotman. Between 20 and 32 students will be enrolled in the course this year. Throughout the year the students study the work of artist activists, discuss art in the social, political and economic contexts, and meet local organizations, activists, and artists. In the summer, each student devotes approximately 180 hours to developing a new or ongoing project in conjunction with a local community. Examples of such projects include creating areas for meeting and leisure in the village of Issawiah through recycling projects, building a platform for open conversation between city residents in the center of Jerusalem, and planning and developing a park in an area that was initially designated as a major road

 

Dr. Michael Klinghoffer

Jerusalem Academy of Music and Dance

course title: The Artist as an Agent of Change

 

 
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