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University of Haifa
[U of Haifa, Jewish History, PhD candidate] Meet the new Israel defamer- Yali Hashash: Racist attempts to restrict Ethiopian women’s fertility

 

The information below is taken from U of Haifa news website quoting an article written by anti-Israel journalist Jonathan Cook in his column to the Abu Dhabi publication "The National":

 

"Yali Hashash, a researcher at Haifa University, said attempts to restrict Ethiopian women’s fertility echoed practices used against Jewish women who immigrated to Israel from such Arab countries as Iraq, Yemen and Morocco in the state’s early years, in the 1950s and 1960s. Many, she said, had been encouraged to fit IUDs when the device was still experimental because Israel’s leading gynecologists regarded Arab Jews as “primitive” and incapable of acting “responsibly”."

 

newmedia-eng.haifa.ac.il

University of Haifa Communications and Media Relations

About: Editor

Full Name
Rachel Feldman
Posts by Editor:
 
The item below is posted on University of Haifa
 
Published by Editor at 2:03 pm under University in the Media
January 5, 2009  The National (Abu Dhabi)
Yali Hashash, a researcher at Haifa University, said attempts to restrict Ethiopian women’s fertility echoed practices used against Jewish women who immigrated to Israel from such Arab countries as Iraq, Yemen and Morocco in the state’s early years, in the 1950s and 1960s.
 
http://www.thenational.ae/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20100106/FOREIGN/701059823/1002/NEWS
 
Israel’s treatment of Ethiopians ‘racist’
Jonathan Cook, Foreign Correspondent
Last Updated: January 05. 2010 11:43PM UAE / January 5. 2010 7:43PM GMT 
Ethiopian Jews are reported to face widespread discrimination in jobs, housing and education in Israel. AP Photo
NAZARETH, Israel // Health officials in Israel are subjecting many female Ethiopian immigrants to a controversial long-term birth control drug in what Israeli women’s groups allege is a racist policy to reduce the number of black babies.
The contraceptive, known as Depo Provera, which is given by injection every three months, is considered by many doctors as a birth control method of last resort because of problems treating its side effects.
 
However, according to a report published last week, use of the contraceptive by Israeli doctors has risen threefold over the past few years. Figures show that 57 per cent of Depo Provera users in Israel are Ethiopian, even though the community accounts for less than two per cent of the total population.
About 90,000 Ethiopians have been brought to Israel under the Law of Return since the 1980s, but their Jewishness has subsequently been questioned by some rabbis and is doubted by many ordinary Israelis.
 
Ethiopians are reported to face widespread discrimination in jobs, housing and education and it recently emerged that their blood donations were routinely discarded.
“This is about reducing the number of births in a community that is black and mostly poor,” said Hedva Eyal, the author of the report by Woman to Woman, a feminist organisation based in Haifa, in northern Israel. “The unspoken policy is that only children who are white and Ashkenazi are wanted in Israel,” she said, referring to the term for European Jews who founded Israel and continue to dominate its institutions.

Women’s groups were alerted to the widespread use of Depo Provera in the Ethiopian community in 2008 when Rachel Mangoli, who runs a day care centre for 120 Ethiopian children in Bnei Braq, a suburb of Tel Aviv, observed that she had received only one new child in the previous three years.
“I started to think about how strange the situation was after I had to send back donated baby clothes because there was no one in the community to give them to,” she said.
 
She approached a local health clinic serving the 55 Ethiopian families in Bnei Braq and was told by the clinic manager that they had been instructed to administer Depo Provera injections to the women of child-bearing age, though he refused to say who had issued the order.
Ms Mangoli, who interviewed the women, said: “They had not been told about alternative forms of contraception or about the side effects or given medical follow-ups.” The women complained of a wide range of side effects associated with the drug, including headaches, abdominal pain, fatigue, nausea, loss of libido and general burning sensations.
 
Depo Provera is also known to decrease bone density, especially among dark-skinned women, which can lead to osteoporosis in later life. Doctors are concerned that it is difficult or impossible to help women who experience severe side effects because the drug is in their system for months after it is injected.
The contraceptive’s reputation has also been tarnished by its association with South Africa, where the apartheid government had used it, often coercively, to limit the fertility of black women.
 
Traditionally, its main uses have been for women who are regarded as incapable of controlling their own reproduction or monitor other forms of birth control, and for women who suffer severe problems during menstruation.
Ms Eyal said she had been denied co-operation from government ministries, doctors and most of the health insurance companies while conducting her research.
Clalit, the largest health company, however, did provide figures showing that 57 per cent of its Depo Provera users were Ethiopian compared with a handful of women in other ethnic groups.
 
The health ministry was unavailable for comment.
When first questioned about Depo Provera in June 2008, the health minister of the time, Yaacov Ben Yezri, said the high number of Ethiopians in Israel using the drug reflected a “cultural preference” for injections among Ethiopians. In fact, according to figures of the World Health Organisation, three-quarters of women in Ethiopia using birth control take the oral pill.
 
“The answers we received from officials demonstrated overt racism,” Ms Eyal said. “They suggested that Ethiopian women should be treated not as individuals but as a collective group whose reproduction needs controlling.”
When Woman to Woman conducted an experiment by sending five non-Ethiopian women to doctors to ask for Depo Provera, all were told that it was prescribed only in highly unusual cases.
 
Ms Mangoli said it was extremely difficult to get immigrant Ethiopian families to speak out because they were afraid that their Jewishness was under suspicion and that they might be deported if they caused trouble.
However, women interviewed anonymously for the report stated that officials at absorption centres in Ethiopia advised them to take Depo Provera because there would be no funds to support their children if they got pregnant in Israel.
 
This policy appears to conflict with the stated goals of the country’s Demography Council, a group of experts charged with devising ways to persuade Jewish women to have more babies.
The council was established in response to what is widely seen in Israel as a “demographic war” with Palestinians, or the need to maintain a Jewish majority in the region despite high Palestinian birth rates. In a speech marking the council’s reconvening in 2002, the then social welfare minister, Shlomo Benizri, referred to “the beauty of the Jewish family that is blessed with many children”.
 
Yali Hashash, a researcher at Haifa University, said attempts to restrict Ethiopian women’s fertility echoed practices used against Jewish women who immigrated to Israel from such Arab countries as Iraq, Yemen and Morocco in the state’s early years, in the 1950s and 1960s.
Many, she said, had been encouraged to fit IUDs when the device was still experimental because Israel’s leading gynecologists regarded Arab Jews as “primitive” and incapable of acting “responsibly”.
 
Allegations of official racism towards Ethiopians gained prominence in 2006 when it was admitted that for many years all their blood donations had been discarded for fear that they might be contaminated with diseases.
There have also been regular reports of Ethiopian children being denied places in schools or being forced to attend separate classes.
In November a survey of employers in the main professions showed that 53 per cent preferred not to hire an Ethiopian.
 
Ruth Sinai, an Israeli social affairs reporter for Haaretz newspaper, wrote recently that the discrimination faced by the country’s 120,000 Ethiopians reflected in particular “doubts on the part of the country’s religious establishment about their Jewishness”.
 
 =======================================================================
 
Below samples of Yali Hashsash activities and publications:
 
Yali Hashash
My name is Yali Hashash. I represent today the women’s Coalition for Peace in Israel, of which the feminist organization I belong to is a member. My organization is called Ahoti, sister, and it stands for social justice, peace, and ethnic equality for women.
Previous attempts to achieve stability in the region, whether in the north through peace negotiations with Syria and Lebanon, or whether through peace settlements with the Palestinians, have all failed so far. It is my belief that one of the main reasons for that failure is that these attempts have failed to take into account any considerations of economic security for the vast population on all sides of the conflict. In Ahoti—my organization—we strongly believe that any discussion of peace in the Middle East is futile unless it gives people a sense of future prospects, both of physical safety, but also of economic stability.
Peace agreement attempts seem to fail in gaining large supporters from all sides partly because they seem to deteriorate rather [than improve] the economic security of large populations. Factories at the periphery in Israel have been shut and moved to Jordan and Egypt for low-cost labor, making the periphery pay for the peace costs. The Oslo Agreement suggested solving most territorial issues, yet offered no economic future prospects for Palestinians. Thus, support for militaristic action at least gives a sense of belonging and solidarity, and perhaps a hope for social mobility to people, which peace as practiced so far has failed to do.
So today, while opposing the aggression against civilians in northern Israel and southern Lebanon, and Israel’s disproportionate retaliation against the civilian population, I wish to remind you that a temporary ceasefire or even a peace agreement is not enough. Only massive investments in local economy throughout the Middle East, while opposing a neo-liberal economy, can recruit people once again into believing that peace holds any future for them and their children. Indeed, only a strong alternative to the American “new order” policy, an alternative that promotes coexistence rather than constant forcing of a neocolonial order, can bring true peace to the region.
Unfortunately, some leaders in my country have adopted the “evil axis” rhetoric promoted by Bush. It is a rhetoric that leads to a dead end and goes against all that we know about true negotiation. Jews and Arabs have long rich traditions of negotiating. Both have been the carriers of goods, knowledge, and culture to the whole world, using negotiation as a skill that is crucial for survival in a heterogeneous reality, and developed it to an art. Given the right economic terms, I am confident that negotiating peace in the Middle East is not beyond us.
Yali Hashash
 
Excerpted from an address to a rally for peace in Copenhagen on 7 August 2006. http://coalitionofwomen.org/home/english/articles/070806
 
 
 
Published by Anonymous on Jul 09, 2009

 

 

744
Ms
Yali Hashash
Haifa, Israel
Asia
N/G
Jul 25, 2009

 
petition:
Free Tali Fahima
Tali Fahima, a 28 years old independent solidarity activist from Kiryat-Gat has committed the worst crime an Israeli can, she crossed the barriers to work with Palestinians in Jenin refugee camp, and befriended a militant. Join the International Solidarity campaign for her release, and visit the campaign web site: www.freetalifahima.org
the petition team
24 Sep. 2004

734 Endorsers (Oct. 4, 2004):

 

Yali Hashash

  

 
 
 

WINNERS OF SHCOLARSHIPS 2006

 

 

WINNERS OF SHCOLARSHIPS

THECHAIM HERZOG CENTER

FOR MIDDLE EAST STUDIES & DIPLOMACY

 

 

 

 =============================================

 

 

http://cwpe.org/files/militarized-zones.pdf

In recent years, a young feminist researcher of
Mizrachi origin,6 Yali Hashash-Daniel, has
demonstrated the differing social pressures exerted
on Jewish women of the Ashkenazi middle
classes and the lower-income Mizrachi communities
in Israel. Hashash-Daniel has documented
and revealed how Israeli medical and social services
(run by the predominantly Ashkenazi middle
class) have pressured lower-income Mizrachi
women to lower their birthrates, on the assumption
that their children would be poorly educated,
“underprivileged,” and not the kind of “quality”
people needed for building the young Jewish state.
To the best of my knowledge, this kind of analysis
is still unrecognized by the majority of feminists
in Israel (not to speak of Israeli society at large)
and cannot be said to be part of mainstream
Israeli feminist discourse.

 

 
 
 
עצומת הציבור הערבי -תיק אוקטובר 2000
 
לאחר שהיועץ המשפטי לממשלה, מני מזוז, החליט סופית לסגור את תיקי הפשע של רצח 13 קורבנות מקרב האזרחים הערבים הפלסטינים בישראל, במהלך אירועי אוקטובר 2000, ובצל כל הסכנות והמשמעויות שההחלטה הזו טומנת בחובה, אנחנו -כאן- מדגישים את התעקשותנו לחשוף את האמת ולהעניש את המעורבים ברצח ואת האחראים עליהם בדרג ה"ביטחוני" והמדיני ולהעמידם לדין. זאת, בנוסף לחשיפת אופי המדיניות הגזענות שעמדה, ועדיין עומדת, מאחורי הפשע הזה שהפצע שלו עדיין שותת דם.

הציבור הערבי הפלסטיני בארץ ומנהיגיו הפוליטיים המאוחדים במסגרת ועדת המעקב העליונה דרש, כבר לאחר ביצוע הפשע באוקטובר 2000, את הקמתה של ועדת חקירה ממלכתית. הוועדה הזו אכן הוקמה לאחר ההתעקשות והדבקות בדרישה הצודקת כאמצעי המינימאלי לחשוף את האמת ולהעניש את האחראים.

לאחר מכן, קראה ועדת המעקב העליונה ליישם את המלצות ועדת החקירה הממלכתית, ועדת אור, בכל הקשור לזכויות, לשוויון ולהמשך החקירה לחשיפה הפושעים ואלו שעמדו מאחוריהם למרות ההסתייגות של ועדת המעקב מרבות מההמלצות ומחלק מהצדדים של ועדת אור. אף אחד מבין ההמלצות החיוביות בדוח הזה לא יושמה והן זכו להתעלמות שגרתית מצד הממסד הישראלי.

החלטתו של היועץ המשפטי לממשלה נועדה לכסות ולחפות על החלטות המחלקה לחקירת שוטרים (מח"ש) לסגור את תיק הפשע מבלי לגלות את הרוצחים ולהענישם. פירושו של דבר הוא שכל ההליכים המשפטיים והחוקיים בזירה הישראלית מוצו.

לאור זאת, החליטה ועדת המעקב, פה אחד לדרוש ולפעול להקמתה של ועדת חקירה ניטראלית בהשתתפות מומחים בינלאומיים כך שסמכויותיה ייחשבו כמו סמכויות של ועדת חקירה רשמית בכל מה שקשור לאיסוף ראיות, חקירה, הופעת עדים מולם והמלצה להגיש כתבי אישום נגד האחראים לפשע הזה, כדי למנוע פשע בעתיד.

אנחנו תומכים בדרישה הזו, דרך העצומה הזו, ומפנים אותה לפורומים הבינלאומיים ובראשם האו"ם ומוסדותיו, למוסדות הבינלאומיים לזכויות אדם ולממשלת ישראל
 
שם מלא
 
yali hashash
 
 
 
  http://miriamswell.spaces.live.com/blog/cns!2939AFF09D9B9C3A!1016.entry

Address by Yali Hashash to a mass rally for peace in Copenhagen on 7 August 2006.

 My name is Yali Hashash. I represent today the women’s Coalition for Peace in Israel, in which the feminist organization I belong to is a member. My organization is called Ahoti – sister, and it stands for social justice, peace, and ethnic equality for women.

 Women from the Coalition were the first to protest the war. A few weeks into the war, thousands in Israel are joining the women’s initiative. And indeed women have much to lose and little to gain from any war situation in the region. While we can all agree that Hizbullah’s threats and actions against the civilian population are intolerable, we cannot understand why Lebanese civilians should pay the price of the conflict, or how massive bombing on a civilian population and infrastructure can promote any attempts to achieve a long lasting peace.

 Previous attempts to achieve stability in the region, whether in the north through peace negotiations with Syria and Lebanon, or whether through peace settlements with the Palestinians, have all failed so far. It is my belief that one of the main reasons for that failure is that these attempts have failed to take into account any considerations of economic security for the vast population on all sides of the conflict. In Ahoti – my organization – we strongly believe that any discussion of peace in the Middle East is futile unless it gives people a sense of future prospects, both of physical safety, but also of economic stability.

 Peace agreement attempts seem to fail in gaining large supporters with all sides partly because they seem to deteriorate rather better the economic security of large populations. Factories in the periphery in israel have been shut and moved to Jordan and Egypt for low cost labor, making the periphery pay for the peace costs. The Oslo agreement suggested solving most territorial issues, yet offered no economic future prospects for Palestinians. Thus, support for militaristic action at least gives a sense of belonging and solidarity, and perhaps a hope for social mobility to people, which peace, as practiced so far has failed to do.

 So today, while opposing the aggression against civilians in northern Israel and southern Lebanon, and Israel’s disproportionate retaliation against the civilian population, I wish to remind you that a temporary ceasefire or even a peace agreement is not enough. Only massive investments in local economy throughout the middle east, while opposing a neoliberal economy, can recruit people once again into believing that peace holds any future for them and their children. Indeed, only a strong alternative to the American “new order” policy, an alternative that promotes coexistence rather than constant forcing of a neocolonial order, can bring true peace to the region.

 Unfortunately, some leaders in my country have adopted the “evil axis” rhetoric promoted by Bush. It is a rhetoric that leads to a dead end, and goes against all that we know about true negotiation. Jews and Arabs have long rich traditions of negotiating. Both have been the carriers of goods, knowledge and culture to the whole world, using negotiation as a skill that is crucial for survival in a heterogenous reality, and developed it to an art.  Given the right economic terms, I am confident that negotiating peace in the middle east is not beyond us.

 __________________

To see an interview with Yali Hashash on Danish TV (from 7 August), click on

http://www.dr.dk/DR2/deadline2230/Deadlineindslag.htm 

Then scroll down to "Interview med israelsk fredsaktivist Yali Hashash"

==================================================

http://groups.yahoo.com/group/ActLeft/message/4132

see attachment if you can't read

 

لقاء

مجموعة فلسطينيين ويهود للحوار البديل

ליקאא

 קבוצת פלסטינים ויהודים לדיאלוג אלטרנטיבי

 

 

الاسقاطات الاجتماعية على السباق الديمغرافي

ההשלכות החברתיות של המרוץ הדמוגראפי

 

יאלי חשש תנהל דיון אשר מרכזו המרוץ הדמוגראפי בהתמקדות על פרויקט "יהוד הגליל"

السيدة يهلي حشش ستدير نقاش حول السباق الديمغرافي وخصوصا مشروع تهويد الجليل.

 

الامسية يوم الاربعاء الموافق 10\12\2003 الساعة السابعة مساءا في مقر جمعية الشباب العرب شارع هرتسيليا 12 الطابق الاخير بمدينة حيفا.

הערב יערך ביום רבעי ה 10.12 בשעה 19:00 במשרדי בעמותה למען נוער וצעירים ערבים ברח' הרצליה 12 ,קומה אחרונה בחיפה.

 

 

لقاء – مكان يلتقى به فلسطينين ويهود بهدف الحوار البديل ومن اجل طرح افكار سياسية واجتماعية والتحاور حولها. نهدف من هذا الاطار الى خلق وعي سياسي اجتماعي ينتج عنه نشاطات وفعاليات سياسية اجتماعية .

للفاصيل :

 

عميت 052783800

نديم   064403634

ליקאא -הינו מקום בו נפגשים פלסטינים ויהודים  בכדי לשמוע ולהביא רעיונות פוליטיים וחברתיים.

המטרה הינה לעודד, ע"י יצירת מודעות, פעילות פוליטית חברתית ולתת גב תומך לפעילות זו.

אנו ננסה להעלות את הנושאים הרחוקים ביותר מהקונצנזוס הישראלי בתקווה שנושאים אלו יעלו למודעות בציבור הרחב.

לפרטים :-

עמית  052783800

נדים    064403634  

 

هذا المشروع برعاية جمعية الشباب العرب-بلدنا  הפרויקט הזה בחסות העמותה למען נוער וצעירים ערבים (באלדנא)

 

 

 
 

 

Yali Hashash, Phd. Ben-Gurion University

Subject:

Jewish Political Thought in the Islamic World between 1850-1950

 

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