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Boycott Calls Against Israel
Statement of Nobel Laureates on Academic BDS Actions Against Israeli Academics

STATEMENT OF NOBEL LAUREATES ON ACADEMIC BDS ACTIONS AGAINST ISRAELI ACADEMICS, ISRAELI ACADEMIC INSTITUTIONS AND ACADEMIC CENTERS AND INSTITUTES OF RESEARCH AND TRAINING WITH AFFILIATIONS IN ISRAEL

By Roger Kornberg, Stanford University and Steven Weinberg, University of Texas at Austin

Published in: A Project of the Scholars for Peace in the Middle East Task Force on Boycotts, Divestments and Sanctions

October 28, 2010

Statement of Nobel Laureates on Academic BDS Actions Against Israeli Academics, Israeli Academic Institutions and Academic Centers and Institutes of Research and Training With Affiliations in Israel


Believing that academic and cultural boycotts, divestments and sanctions in the academy are:

* antithetical to principles of academic and scientific freedom,
* antithetical to principles of freedom of expression and inquiry, and
* may well constitute discrimination by virtue of national origin,

We, the undersigned Nobel Laureates, appeal to students, faculty colleagues and university officials to defeat and denounce calls and campaigns for boycotting, divestment and sanctions against Israeli academics, academic institutions and university-based centers and institutes for training and research, affiliated with Israel.

Furthermore, we encourage students, faculty colleagues and university officials to promote and provide opportunities for civil academic discourse where parties can engage in the search for resolution to conflicts and problems rather than serve as incubators for polemics, propaganda, incitement and further misunderstanding and mistrust.

We, and many like us, have dedicated ourselves to improving the human condition by doing the often difficult and elusive work to understand complex and seemingly unsolvable phenomena. We believe that the university should serve as an open, tolerant and respectful, cooperative and collaborative community engaged in practices of resolving complex problems.


Sidney Altman
Yale University
Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1989

Lawrence Klein
University of Pennsylvania
Nobel Prize in Economics, 1980


Kenneth Arrow
Stanford University
Nobel Prize in Economics, 1972


Walter Kohn
University of California Santa Barbara
Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1998


Robert J. Aumann
Hebrew University of Jerusalem
Nobel Prize in Economics, 2005


Roger D. Kornberg
Stanford University
Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 2006


Mario Capecchi
University of Utah
Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2007


Harold Kroto
Florida State University
Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1996


Aaron Ciechanover
Technion
Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 2004


Finn Kydland
University of California Santa Barbara
Nobel Prize in Economics, 2004


Claude Cohen-Tannoudji
École Normale Supérieure
Nobel Prize in Physics, 1997


Leon Lederman
Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
Nobel Prize in Physics, 1988


Robert Curl
Rice University
Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1996


Tony Leggett
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Nobel Prize in Physics, 2003


Edmond H. Fischer
University of Washington
Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1992


Robert Lucas, Jr.
University of Chicago
Nobel Prize in Economics, 1995


Jerome Friedman
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Nobel Prize in Physics, 1990


Rudolph A. Marcus
California Institute of Technology
Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1992


Andre Geim
Manchester University
Nobel Prize in Physics, 2010


Roger Myerson
University of Chicago
Nobel Prize in Economics, 2007


Sheldon Glashow
Boston University
Nobel Prize in Physics, 1979


George A. Olah
University of Southern California
Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1994


David Gross
University of California Santa Barbara
Nobel Prize in Physics, 2004


Douglas Osheroff
Stanford University
Nobel Prize in Physics, 1996


James Heckman
University of Chicago
Nobel Prize in Economics, 2000


Martin L. Perl
Stanford University
Nobel Prize in Physics, 1995


Avram Hershko
Technion
Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 2004


Andrew V. Schally
University of Miami
Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1977


Roald Hoffman
Cornell University
Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 1981


Richard R. Schrock
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Nobel Prize in Chemistry, 2005


Russell Hulse
University of Texas Dallas
Nobel Prize in Physics, 1993


Phillip A. Sharp
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1993


Tim Hunt
London Research Institute
Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2001


Steven Weinberg
University of Texas at Austin
Nobel Prize in Physics, 1979


Daniel Kahneman
Princeton University
Nobel Prize in Economics, 2002


Elie Wiesel
Nobel Peace Prize, 1986


Eric Kandel
Columbia University
Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2000


Torsten Wiesel
Rockefeller University
Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 1981

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

For Further Information Contact:

Edward S. Beck, Walden University, President-Emeritus and Chair, SPME Task Force on Boycotts, Divestments and Sanction, 717.576.5038 or ScholarsforPeace@aol.com

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