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General Articles
The University of Amsterdam: Home for Anti-Israel Activism

22.11.17
Editorial Note
University of Amsterdam (UoA) has been the home of anti-Israel activism.  A combination of a large number of Arab students and staff and the lack of interference by the university authorities made it a fertile ground for this activism.   

UoA is a home of gate48, a group of former Israeli academics - a subject of previous IAM reports - which embraced the Palestinian narrative and tries to promote the boycott of Israel.  This month, Gate48 is involved in organizing events at the UoA focusing on the centenary of the Balfour Declaration intending to present Israel in a negative light.

Erez Tzfadia of Sapir College, Israel's largest public college, was invited to UoA and gave a talk, "Beyond the Balfour Declaration: navigating everyday life in contemporary Israel/Palestine".  Tzfadia's lecture dealt with "how colonization is shaped and reshaped in social and cultural practices and discourses within the dominant society – the Jewish society in Israel/Palestine" and how Israel - "To realize territorial control, practices of demographic engineering were implemented, including eviction of the ‘enemy’." Tzfadia's masterclass "Colonization, Culture and the Production of Space in Israel/Palestine" was organized by Noa Roei, the chairperson of gate48. 

UoA has also hosted David Cronin who spoke on "Balfour’s Shadow. A Century of British Support for Zionism and Israel," detailing how Britain "facilitated the dispossession of Palestinians".  Cronin is described as an Irish journalist and political activist living in Brussels, author of the Europe’s Alliance With Israel: Aiding the Occupation, and a contributing editor at The Electronic Intifada.  

UoA PhD student Mikki Stelder is working on a thesis titled Queer Visibility and Visions of Palestine-Israel: On Pinkwashing and Resistanceshe is also the author of "Zionist sexual politics and the formation of settler subjectivity"Not surprisingly, Stelder is a Palestine solidarity activist at the University of Amsterdam. 

This is not new, among others, in 2015 UoA has held the conference "The politics of cultural freedom" which addressed "different questions in relation to the growing global boycott movement like: Should culture and art be regarded as standing “above politics” and therefore be spared the growing boycott against Israel? Is the cultural boycott inherently in conflict with freedom of speech and freedom of the exchange of ideas? Is it fair to compare Israel to South African apartheid despite the obvious differences? What impact can the cultural boycott have on the global struggle for Palestinian rights, justice and equality? How can Israelis be part of the global boycott movement?"  Speakers included Omar Barghouti, Eyal Sivan, and Anne de Jong of UoA. Gate48 was a co-organizer.

While delegitimizing Israel is taking place by the UoA, pro-Palestinian initiatives are on the rise. Next month, on December 05, the UoA is planning to host Palestinian Ambassador Rawan Sulaiman, head of the Palestinian mission to the Netherlands and Thomas Seiler, the desk officer of the ‘occupied Palestinian territory’ at the European External Action Service.   The public lecture titled "The EU and state-building in Palestine: EU policies and Palestinian perceptions," described in the invitation as, "since the 1993 Oslo Accords the EU, more than any other international actor, has heavily invested in the Palestinian state-building with the aim of helping the Palestinians build their own institutions".  The invitation explains the "rationale behind this was that the building and well functioning of Palestinian institutions would lead to the establishment of a Palestinian state living alongside Israel in peace and security."  The invitation also states that "This was also the rationale behind the Roadmap as well as the Palestinian former Prime Minister’s Salam Fayyad Plan entitled "Palestine — Ending the Occupation, Establishing the State”. Despite the fact that the EU was the main contributor to Fayyad’s plan, its member states failed to reach a consensus in the 2012 UN vote upgrading Palestine to a ’non-Member Observer State’."  In particular this event aims "to take stock of the EU’s policies towards the Palestinian state-building, shed light on recent initiatives as well as analyse Palestinian perceptions towards them." 

Also, UoA scholar Dimitris Bouris of the department of Political Science, is publishing a paper with the Italian Istituto Affari Internazionali titled "Imposing Middle East Peace: Why EU Member States Should Recognise Palestine." He implores the EU member states for a "clear paradigm shift," and "real revision of EU policies," as recognizing Palestine is "a moral duty." To his mind a "consensus in Brussels and pressure from big member states can help, acting as potential paradigm and norm setters while encouraging the bandwagoning of other states." By recognizing the state of Palestine, EU member states "would also force the US into action under the weight of an overwhelming international consensus."  He argues "while Israel might react badly to this move... recognition would actually send a strong signal that the EU wishes to legitimize the state of Israel within the 1967 borders while clearly delegitimizing the occupation. In the long-term, recognition will help protect Israel from criticism as well as from the eventuality of a one-state approach which Abbas has again promised to endorse if the latest US peace plan is not successful." Bouris suggests that "Recognizing a Palestinian state is cheaper than maintaining (and paying for) the occupation. The EU spends around 500 million euro a year on Palestine."  More to the point, "just as the EU’s differentiation policy has activated the Israeli research and economic community to put pressure on the government to resolve the dispute in order to allow them to receive EU grants and research funding, recognition might do the same with Israel’s broader political landscape by sending a strong signal that there is a cost to Israel’s continued occupation." Bouris postulates that recognizing the state of Palestine "will also help to strengthen moderate elements within Palestinian factions and parties". 

It is worth noting that there are no positive conferences of Israel at the UoA and the Israeli perspective is not being presented.  The authorities of UoA should make sure that activities pertaining to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict are balanced.  Regrettably, by refusing to get involved, they allow a group of pro-Palestinian activists to turn the university, a seat of prestigious learning, into a source of poisonous propaganda against Israel. 



 
The EU and state-building in Palestine: EU policies and Palestinian perceptions
EU_Nobel_Peace_Prize_0.jpg The Europe and the World Theme presents the 2nd edition of the ACCESS Europe Practitioners Series on the EU and conflicts both in its territory but also its neighbourhood. Three lectures by renowned academics and experienced practitioners are lined up. 
Since the 1993 Oslo Accords, the EU, more than any other international actor, has heavily invested in the Palestinian state-building with the aim of helping the Palestinians build their own institutions. The rationale behind this was that the building and well functioning of Palestinian institutions would lead to the establishment of a Palestinian state living alongside Israel in peace and security. This was also the rationale behind the Roadmap as well as the Palestinian former Prime Minister’s Salam Fayyad Plan entitled "Palestine — Ending the Occupation, Establishing the State”. Despite the fact that the EU was the main contributor to Fayyad’s plan, its member states failed to reach a consensus in the 2012 UN vote upgrading Palestine to a ’non-Member Observer State’. The aim of this event is to take stock of the EU’s policies towards the Palestinian state-building, shed light on recent initiatives as well as analyse Palestinian perceptions towards them. 

Speakers:

H. E. Ambassador Rawan Sulaiman, Head of the Palestinian Mission to the Netherlands.
Mr. Thomas Seiler, Desk Officer ‘occupied Palestinian territory’, European External Action Service.
Registration for this event is compulsory

Location

University Library, Singel 425, C. C0.07 (Doelenzaal)
Postal Address:
PO Box 15718
1001 NE Amsterdam
+31 (0)20-525 2185 / +31 (0)6 1587 7838
============================================================




Imposing Middle East Peace: Why EU Member States Should Recognise Palestine
Dimitris Bouris and Daniela Huber*

A century ago, the Balfour Declaration promised to support a “national home for the Jewish people”, but ignored the right to self-determination of the local Arab-Palestinian majority, referred to as “non-Jewish communities”. Fifty years ago, in 1967, the Israeli occupation of Palestine began, today “the longest-running military occupation in the modern world”.[1]

In 1980, the European Community acted as a paradigm setter when it came forward with the Venice Declaration, recognizing the Palestinian right to self-determination, demanding the inclusion of the PLO in negotiations, stressing the need for Israel to end the occupation and underscored the illegality of Israeli settlements.[2] While the Venice Declaration has been a norm-setter in many respects, it was nonetheless a far cry from the position of the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) which in the same year affirmed Palestine’s right to establish an independent state of its own.[3]

Europe’s framing of Palestine’s right to statehood has been rather ambiguous ever since. In the late 1970s and 1980s, the European Community spoke about the Palestinians’ right “to self-determination with all that this implies” and the “legitimate right of the Palestinian people to give effective expression to its national identity”.[4] In the late 1990s, when Arafat threatened to unilaterally declare Palestinian statehood, the EU came up with the Berlin Declaration, expressing “its readiness to consider the recognition of a Palestinian State in due course”.[5] A decade later, this was replaced with “when appropriate”.[6]

Needless to say, the timeframe of “due course” and specific parameters of “when appropriate” were never defined. These promises were made because of fear that Palestinians would take steps in the framework of international law and multilateral institutions such as the International Criminal Court (ICC) and the UN, challenging the prevailing belief that direct bilateral negotiations were the sole mode to resolve the conflict.

EU Council and Parliament resolutions make recognition implicitly conditional on negotiations. This approach is close to the US position, which since the early 2000s advocates a Palestinian state not as a right but as the result of direct negotiations between an occupied people and their occupying power. As Valentina Azarova has pointed out, under the law of occupation, to “protect a people’s right to self-determination, the resolution of any ‘final status’ issues […] is deferred until the end of occupation. Relegating this process to the end of the occupation is meant to prevent the occupier from coercing local authorities into ceding territorial or other sovereign rights while under the gun.”[7]

Resulting from its ambiguous position, the EU has ended up footing the bill of Palestinian state-building and Israel’s occupation without advancing the prospect of Palestinian statehood. This may have proven relatively effective in terms of managing the conflict, but not resolving it and can no longer represent a sustainable approach.

Over the last three decades, the EU has failed to prevent the entrenchment of the occupation, which fragments Palestinian land and communities and makes a two-state solution increasingly unfeasible. After 50 years of unending occupation, it is time for a paradigm shift, a new Venice Declaration, in which the EU and its member states join a vast majority of the international community in recognizing Palestine as a state.

After Oslo, the EU provided over half of the funding that supported the setting up of the Palestinian Authority’s (PA) quasi-state institutions and between 1994 and 1998, 40 percent of EU aid money was channelled to construction, infrastructure and natural resources management.[8] Much of this money was wasted because of Israel’s destruction of this infrastructure during the second intifada.[9] The new phase of the state-building project started with the so-called Roadmap, which included three phases, the last of which envisioned the establishment and recognition of a Palestinian state by the end of 2005. Not only did the Roadmap fail to deliver a Palestinian state but it was also followed by Hamas’ victory in the 2006 Palestinian elections, the subsequent split between the Fatah-run West Bank and the Hamas-run Gaza Strip and the adoption of the “West Bank First” strategy initiated by the US and supported by the EU.[10] Former Palestinian Prime Minister Salam Fayyad was supported by the EU in his ambitious state-building plan, “Ending the Occupation, Establishing the State”. Although the plan never mentioned this explicitly, the idea was to build all necessary institutions of a Palestinian state within a 2-year period, then leaving it up to the international community to recognize such a state.

The limits of Fayyad’s plan but also of the whole approach that “if you build it, the state will come” became clear during the PA’s failed efforts to get UN Security Council recognition of statehood in 2011 and the subsequent 2012 UNGA decision to upgrade Palestine to “non-member observer state”. The vote was a moment of truth. A three-way voting split among EU member states was observed with the Czech Republic being the only EU member state to vote against the upgrade alongside other eight countries: Canada, Israel, the US, the Marshall Islands, the Federated States of Micronesia, Nauru, Palau and Panama.

With the non-recognition of Palestine, the farce of the state-building process was exposed: while Fayyad proved Palestinian state capacity, the US and many EU member states still refused to recognize it. To many this seemed to confirm the hypothesis that the creation of the PA did not serve the goal of building a state, but rather to manage a population under occupation.[11]

The recent reconciliation deal between Fatah and Hamas, Israel’s expanding settlement construction as well as the US’ inability to bring anything meaningful to the table, all call for urgent and bold steps. What is needed from the EU is a clear paradigm shift, a real revision of EU policies and conventional wisdoms on the conflict.

Such a review should follow the example of the Venice Declaration and those EU member states which have not already done so should come out and recognize the state of Palestine. While each member state will ultimately decide whether to recognize Palestine, a consensus in Brussels and pressure from big member states can help, acting as potential paradigm and norm setters while encouraging the bandwagoning of other states.

Such a consensus should be built around six core assumptions:

First, by recognizing the state of Palestine EU member states would be complying with a vast international consensus. Out of 193 UN states, 137 have already recognized the state of Palestine leaving only 56 states which have not done so. Out of the present 28 EU member states, eight (Bulgaria, Cyprus, Slovakia, Hungary, Malta, Poland, Sweden and Romania) have recognized Palestine. Having the other 20 EU member states join in on the recognition will not just add to the quantitative aspect but also the qualitative as this will leave only 30 states worldwide not recognizing Palestine, among them Fiji, Kiribati, Palau, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Samoa, Tonga and Tuvalu.

Second, by pursuing this step, the EU would in fact swing the pendulum. While the state of Palestine already enjoys an absolute majority in terms of recognition by all UN member states, none of the key Western powers has yet done so. A common EU stance for recognition would be a yardstick – as David Horovitz put it, the EU is the barometer of international legitimacy.[12] That is why the EU matters and where it enjoys real normative power;[13] it would create new facts in terms of international consensus as the Palestinian right to statehood would become an almost unanimously shared objective. Such a move would also force the US into action under the weight of an overwhelming international consensus on the existence of two sovereign states.

Third, while Israel might react badly to this move, as it did to the Venice Declaration or the EU’s 2014 differentiation policy, recognition would actually send a strong signal that the EU wishes to legitimize the state of Israel within the 1967 borders while clearly delegitimizing the occupation. In the long-term, recognition will help protect Israel from criticism as well as from the eventuality of a one-state approach which Abbas has again promised to endorse if the latest US peace plan is not successful.[14]

Fourth, just as the EU’s differentiation policy has activated the Israeli research and economic community to put pressure on the government to resolve the dispute in order to allow them to receive EU grants and research funding, recognition might do the same with Israel’s broader political landscape by sending a strong signal that there is a cost to Israel’s continued occupation. Furthermore, it will also help to strengthen moderate elements within Palestinian factions and parties. As a result, recognition would trigger dynamics that could strengthen the motivation of all sides to enter into negotiations.

Fifth, recognizing the state of Palestine will be consistent with all EU state-building policies and declarations, helping to give EU aid policies a political objective and framework. Recognizing a Palestinian state is cheaper than maintaining (and paying for) the occupation. The EU spends around 500 million euro a year on Palestine.

Sixth, and finally, recognizing Palestine is a moral duty, not only in respect to the deep historical involvement of key European states in setting the context for the conflict, but also by approaching the conflict in the framework of justice, rights and international law.

Recognizing Palestine will not bring about an actual state the next day. But recognition is a necessary step to break the stalemate at the international diplomatic level, to offer a new strategy and format which will address the power imbalance of the two parties and treat them as equal and to prevent a discriminatory one-state reality which is closer than we think. Recognition will eventually bring everyone closer to the final goal of two states, living side by side in peace and security.

* Dimitris Bouris is Assistant Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Amsterdam.
Daniela Huber is Senior Fellow within the Mediterranean and Middle East Programme at the Istituto Affari Internazionali (IAI) and Gerda Henkel Researcher at LUISS University.


[1] Michael Lynk, Report of the Special Rapporteur on the Situation of Human Rights in the Palestinian Territories Occupied Since 1967 (A/72/556), 23 October 2017, p. 6, http://undocs.org/A/72/556.

[2] European Council, Venice Declaration, 13 June 1980, https://eeas.europa.eu/mepp/docs/venice_declaration_1980_en.pdf.

[3] United Nations General Assembly, Resolution 35/207. The Situation in the Middle East (A/RES/35/207), 16 December 1980, http://undocs.org/A/RES/35/207.

[4] European Council, Council Conclusions, Brussels, 28-29 June 1982, http://aei.pitt.edu/1429; European Council, Council Conclusions, London, 29-30 June 1977, http://aei.pitt.edu/1410.

[5] European Council, Presidency Conclusions, Berlin, 24-25 March 1999, http://www.europarl.europa.eu/summits/ber2_en.htm#partIV.

[6] Council of the European Union, Conclusions on the Middle East Peace Process, 3058th Foreign Affairs Council meeting, 13 December 2010, p. 14, http://data.consilium.europa.eu/doc/document/ST-17835-2010-INIT/en/pdf.

[7] Valentina Azarova, “Israel’s Unlawfully Prolonged Occupation: Consequences under an Integrated Legal Framework”, in ECFR Policy Briefs, June 2017, p. 3, http://www.ecfr.eu/publications/summary/israels_unlawfully_prolonged_occupation_7294.

[8] Dimitris Bouris, The European Union and Occupied Palestinian Territories. State-building without a State, London and New York, Routledge, 2014, p. 76.

[9] Dimitris Bouris and George Kyris, “Europeanisation, Sovereignty and Contested States: The EU in Northern Cyprus and Palestine”, in The British Journal of Politics and International Relations, Vol. 19, No. 4 (2017), p. 765, https://doi.org/10.1177/1369148117727534.

[10] Dimitris Bouris, “Riding the Shotgun. The EU’s Role in the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict”, in Carnegie Regional Insights, 17 September 2014, http://ceip.org/2kc99J2.

[11] Neve Gordon, Israel’s Occupation, Berkeley, University of California  Press, 2008.

[12] David Horovitz, “The Battle for Europe”, in The Jerusalem Post, 3 June 2011, http://www.jpost.com/Opinion/Columnists/Editors-Notes-The-battle-for-Europe.

[13] Dimitris Bouris and Nathan Brown, “Can the EU Revive the Cause of Middle East Peace?”, in Carnegie Articles, 29 May 2014, http://ceip.org/2hEjCMY.

[14] “Abbas: PA Could Move to Back One-State Solution If Two States Fail”, in The Times of Israel, 11 November 2017, https://www.timesofisrael.com/?p=1727878.

Data pubblicazione: 
17/11/2017

  • ==========================================================================





    Amsterdam Institute for Humanities Research (AIHR)


    Beyond the Balfour Declaration: navigating everyday life in contemporary Israel/Palestine

    In cooperation with the Faculty of Humanities, ASCA, ACMES and Gate48


    Event
    09Nov2017
    17:00 - 18:30
    November 2017 marks the 100-year anniversary of the Balfour declaration, a public statement issued by the British government announcing support for the establishment of a national homeland for the Jewish people in Palestine.
    To mark the event we have invited scholars to present on issues relating to space and society in contemporary Israel/Palestine. The scholars will, each from their own research practice, focus on different aspects of how people navigate everyday life and how this is affected by the regulation of space. 
    Erez Tzfadia will discuss two aspects which the Balfour declaration symbolizes for the Zionist movement: an imperial support of Jewish colonization of Palestine and the supremacy of the rule of law. However, the rule of law and the logic of colonialism may contradict each other, resulting in practices of territorial control in which the logic of ethno-nationalism, and not the logic of law, determines the future of development.
    For about a decade now, Salem Al Qudwa has been using photography in his field trips as an emergency architect, in areas inhabited by communities in need and affected by the Israeli attacks on the Gaza Strip, Palestine. The photographs both map physical places and record the social characteristics inherent in inhabiting such places. In his talk, Salem will provide and discuss some visual pieces showing how the residents of Gaza have dealt with the spatial constraints on Gaza.
    Erella Grassiani will focus on the way Israeli security technologies, knowledge, actors and the political ideologies that accompany them are shaped by the spaces in which they are constructed and move from one national space to another. She will examine what happens when products and actors move from spaces of occupation that are immersed within Zionist ideologies, to a commercial market and to spaces abroad with their own political realities.

    Location 

    Spui 25 Spui 25-27 | 1012 WX Amsterdam +31 (0)20 525 8142


    ==============================================================

    http://www.nica-institute.com/erez-tzfadia-colonization-space-israelpalestine/

    Erez Tzfadia: Colonization and Space in Israel/Palestine

    Colonization, Culture and the Production of Space in Israel/Palestine
    Lecture and Masterclass with Erez Tzfadia
    Public event:   9 November, Spui25, time tba
    Masterclass:   10 November 10:00 – 14:00, P.C.Hoofthuis (Spuistraat 145) room 3.19
    Contact: Noa Roei, n.roei@uva.nl
    Enrollmentnica-fgw@uva.nl
    ECTS: 1 for research MA students that participate in both parts of the event
    Masterclass
    The footprints of colonialism and colonization are well marked in Israel/Palestine geographies. More than 1000 new Jewish towns and villages have been built since late 19th century in frontier and border regions, some of them over the ruins of Palestinian territory. This is the known story of Israel/Palestine. Less known is how colonization is shaped and reshaped in social and cultural practices and discourses within the dominant society – the Jewish society in Israel/Palestine. In the context of colonization, frontiers have become symbols representing empirical manifestations of state power, as well as security discourses and territorial control. To realize territorial control, practices of demographic engineering were implemented, including eviction of the ‘enemy’, and forced settlement of marginal communities. Demographic engineering relied on cultural logic and ethno-class division that eventually categorized and marginalized some segments of the dominant group.
    We will elaborate on the following questions: What is the nature of nation building projects in settler-colonial societies? What is the role that culture plays in settler-colonial societies? Is there an end to settler-colonialism? And, what can we learn from the case study of Israel/Palestine about the relation between social marginalization and demographic engineering in a broader context?
    The seminar is conceived as an interactive session in which participants will be actively engaged. We encourage participants to bring questions from their own research as they pertain to the issues posed by the materials.
    Preparatory readings:
    • Tzfadia, E. and Yacobi, H. (2011). Rethinking Israel Space: Periphery and Identity, Routledge, pp. 8-19, 117-121.
    • Murphy, Alexander B. (2002). “National Claims to Territory in the Modern State System: Geographical Considerations”, Geopolitics, 7(2), pp.193–214.
    • More readings tba
    1EC is available for registered graduate students who attend both parts of the event

    Public Lecture
    November 2017 marks the 100-year anniversary of the Balfour declaration, a public statement issued by the British government announcing support for the establishment of a national home for the Jewish people in Palestine. To mark the event, ACMES and ASCA have invited scholars to present on issues relating to space and society in contemporary Israel/Palestine. The scholars will, each from their own research practice, focus on different aspect of how people navigate everyday life and how this is affected by the regulation of space.
    In his contribution, Erez Tzfadia will present two aspects that the Balfour declaration symbolizes for the Zionist movement:  an imperial support at Jewish colonization of Palestine and the supremacy of the rule of law – associated with modernism and rationalism ,similar to the way in which the Zionist movement conceived itself. However, the rule of law and the logic of colonialism may contradict each other: while the rule of law means fixed rules applicable to all, a sense of equality under the law and ideals of justice and individual dignity – colonialism means unequal territorial rights according to ethnic and racial (imagined) hierarchies. This tension, Tzfadia argues, results in practices of territorial control and dispossession, based on ‘gray spacing’: temporal and informal development of land in which the logic of ethno-nationalism, and not the logic of law, determines the future of development – formalization or eviction. Tzfadia will present the temporality of two informalities in the West Bank – the Palestinian village Khan El-Akhmar near East Jerusalem and of Jewish outpost Amona to reveal the tensions and compatibilities of the two principles that the Balfour declaration represented: colonialism and the rule of law.
    Erez Tzfadia teaches and researches spatial policy and politics at the department of public policy and administration at Sapir College, Israel. In 2015–2016 he was an Israel Institute Visiting Scholar at Rutgers University. Erez earned his PhD in geography at Ben- Gurion University in 2002, and was a Lady Davis Postdoctoral Fellow at the Hebrew University in 2003. He is also the chairperson of an Israeli non-profit organization BIMKOM – Planners for Planning Rights



    ==========================================================


     

    http://www.spui25.nl/spui25-en/events/events/2017/11/balfour%E2%80%99s-shadow.html

    Balfour’s Shadow. A Century of British Support for Zionism and Israel

    In cooperation with American Book Center and docP

    02nov2017

    20:00 - 21:30


    Evenement

    A public programme with author David Cronin at the occasion of his new book ‘Balfour’s Shadow’ as well as the 100-year anniversary of the Balfour Declaration.
    In November 1917, Britain caused one of the great fault lines in the Middle East. A declaration signed by Arthur James Balfour, then foreign secretary, favoured the establishment of a ‘Jewish national home’ in Palestine, a predominantly Arab land.
    David Cronin’s new book, Balfour’s Shadow, provides a trenchant critique of Britain’s 100-year-old support for the Zionist colonisation project. Unearthing facts neglected by many historians, Cronin documents Britain’s frequently brutal conduct when it ruled Palestine between the two world wars. Such brutality facilitated the dispossession of Palestinians and spawned injustices that have been allowed to fester.
    Britain’s relationship with the Zionist movement has proven resilient, despite periods of hostility. A century ago Britain was the chief imperial sponsor of the Zionist project; today some of Britain’s key policies on ‘defense’ rely on Israeli-designed weapons. Balfour’s Shadow traces the evolution of an intriguing alliance with lethal consequences. 
    David Cronin is an Irish journalist and political activist. He is a contributing editor with The Electronic Intifada, a website focused on Palestine. His earlier books are ‘Europe's Alliance With Israel: Aiding the Occupation’ (Pluto, 2011) and ‘Corporate Europe: How Big Business Sets Policies on Food, Climate and War’ (Pluto, 2013).
    Ihab Saloul is Palestinian, and Assistant Professor of Cultural Studies and Academic Coordinator Heritage & Memory Studies at the University of Amsterdam. Saloul is also a visiting professor of culture and politics at Freie Universität Berlin. He was a EUME-Fellow at the Wissenschaftkolleg zu Berlin (The Institute for Advanced Study, Berlin), and taught previously Comparative Literature and Media Studies at Maastricht University.
    Janneke Stegeman studied protestant theology at the VU University and obtained her master’s degree in Old Testament studies. In 2014, she earned a PhD with her dissertation ‘Decolonizing Jeremiah: Identity, Narratives and Power in Religious Tradition’. Stegeman until recently was ‘Theoloog des Vaderlands’. She also worked as a theologian at De Nieuwe Liefde.
    Anne de Jong (moderator) is an assistant professor Anthropology of Conflict with a region expertise on the Middle East (Palestine, Lebanon, Syria and Bahrain). For her PhD she conducted a 19 month fieldwork research in the Occupied Palestinian Territories including East-Jerusalem and Gaza.
    Tickets are €5,-. The ticket fee will be deducted from the price of the book bought at the event. 



    ====================================================================
     

    The politics of cultural freedom

    23-04-2015
    University of Amsterdam, Oudemanhuispoort 4-6, room F0.01
    The discussion will address different questions in relation to the growing global boycott movement like: Should culture and art be regarded as standing “above politics” and therefore be spared the growing boycott against Israel? Is the cultural boycott inherently in conflict with freedom of speech and freedom of the exchange of ideas? Is it fair to compare Israel to South African apartheid despite the obvious differences? What impact can the cultural boycott have on the global struggle for Palestinian rights, justice and equality? How can Israelis be part of the global boycott movement?
     
    Speakers:
     
    Omar Barghouti, founding member of the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI)
    Eyal Sivan, Israeli filmmaker, Honorary Fellow - European Center for Palestine Studies, University of Exeter, UK
    Anne de Jong, assistant professor anthropology, University of Amsterdam
     
    The discussion is organized by Palestine Link, gate48, and the Leonhard-Woltjer Stichting.
     


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