Home
Search
עברית
Board & Mission Statement
Why IAM?
About Us
Articles by IAM Associates
Ben-Gurion University
Hebrew University
University of Haifa
Tel Aviv University
Other Institutions
Boycott Calls Against Israel
Israelis in Non-Israeli Universities
Anti-Israel Petitions Supported by Israeli Academics
General Articles
Anti-Israel Conferences
Lawfare
Anti-Israel Academic Resolutions
Lectures Interrupted
Activists Profiles
Readers Forum
On the Brighter Side
How can I complain?
Contact Us / Subscribe
Donate
Hebrew University
HUJ Yael Berda Sociology Courses are Political Activism Paid by the Taxpayers

03.01.19
Editorial Note

IAM often reports about the new generation of political activists eager to gain tenure in Israeli universities. One such an example is Dr. Yael Berda of the Hebrew University's Sociology Department. 

Trained as a lawyer, Berda is a longstanding activist with Machsom Watch, a group that opposes Israeli checkpoints in Judea and Samaria. When studying for a PhD in Princeton University, Berda was a member of the Princeton Committee on Palestine (PCP) which "works to end the occupation in Palestine, defend Palestinian human rights, and raise awareness in the Princeton community about the Palestinian narrative."  While in Princeton she also joined other Israeli academics from various American universities, who formed the Israeli Opposition Network, aiming to "oppose current Israeli Leadership" and to warn that the "election results threaten democracy and rule of law in Israel."

Clearly, in her writing and activism Berda turns a blind eye to Palestinian violence against Israelis by opposing Israel's measures to thwart terrorist threats. As she said in an interview,  about the years when she took the first legal case as an independent lawyer. "I was shocked by what I saw in the Military Courts. Not only was there a separation of laws for every population, but there was physical separation in the court between the entry of Jewish citizens and the entrance of Palestinian residents, and even separate seating areas. One of the soldiers told me, 'Why are you in shock? This is the territories - there are other laws here.'"

On a regular basis, Berda is the organizer of demonstrations by a group of Israelis who march near the border-fence with Gaza waving banners in against the siege of Gaza. When Berda was interviewed she said "It is important for us that people on the other side see us, that they see there are different voices, and that they know that we think there is a need to talk about the right of return, about the Palestinian refugees. It must be part of an agreement. Until we talk about it - we can not end the conflict."

Berda's political thought brought her to the group "The Two States, One Homeland," sponsored by the New Israel Fund, an initiative by Israeli journalist Meron Rapoport and Palestinian activist Awni Al-Mashni, a Fatah political activist. The group intends to present "a homeland shared by two people [while] each having deep historic, religious and cultural connections to the land."

Already in 2006 Berda was recruiting students to volunteer in organizations such as Yesh Din and Machsom Watch, promising them NIS 1450 grant.  As an MA student of Sociology, Berda was a teaching assistant to TAU Prof. Yehuda Shenhav at the Hebrew University's Campus-Community Partnerships for a Social Change, a project initiated by Daphna Golan-Agnon, Faculty of Law. The course "Bureaucracy, Governance and Human Rights" was taught by Shenhav, instructed by Barda with a guest lecturer Adv. Michael Sfard. The course intended to deal with "practice and management theory, while focusing on control techniques that have emerged within the context of the Israeli occupation in the territories." The historical roots, to try to place them within the "colonial context, especially the British and the French ones".  In particular, the course focused on the "connection between race and bureaucracy,"  The course intended especially to "look beyond the shoulder of the worker in the civil service to try to understand the mechanism in which it operates. The course  was defined as a seminar that combines theory and practice." In addition to Shenhav, "Sfard joined the course as a guest lecturer and legal adviser to Yesh Din. The students take action every two weeks in observations, in the project of Military Court Observers, a project of Yesh Din  and in the Coordination Project of Machsom Watch. The students work with the assistance of the organizations in documenting, representing and liaising with the official authorities, while keeping a travelogue of activities.  The students accompanied by Adv. Yael Barda, at the individual level and the group level. The students receive travel fee to the places of activity and an annual grant of NIS 1450.  At the end of the year, each student submits an article based on the activities and experiences relating to the theoretical content of the course. Some of these articles were selected for publication in a book edited by Shenhav, Sfard and Barda, in partnership with the organizations."

Clearly, Berda's scholarship is a configuration of her politics, as can be seen in her article published recently in the American Sociological Association's newsletter, Trajectories, based on the conference "Empires, Colonies, Indigenous Peoples". In Berda's paper, "Legacies of Suspicion: From British Colonial Emergency Regulations to the ‘War on Terror’ in Israel and India" she aligns herself with the latest academic trend accusing British colonialism for the failures of the former colonies.  
 
Berda's one-homeland solution is reflected in the argument, that the 1948 partition between the Jews and the Palestinians has turned the Palestinian minorities in Israel "into foreign and dangerous populations [which] were perceived as hostile because they were on the 'wrong' side of the border." In particular, she claims, the "emergency laws targeted certain problematic or 'dangerous' segments of the subject population". For Berda, Israel treats Palestinian political activists as terrorists. Again turning her argument into the context of race, she suggests that on racial grounds Israel prefers Jews. As "the laws targeted the subjects of the military regime who became Palestinian citizens of Israel. Emergency regulations were used against Jewish citizens only in a handful of cases." Claiming that her comparative study of emergency regulations, "illuminates the inherent tension of the liberal principle of 'the rule of law'", because it gives a "political legitimacy to infringe on civil rights, so long as the infringement abides by institutional standards". In principle, Berda postulates, "laws preserving security include potential infringement of civil and political rights to such a degree that democratic structure becomes hollow."   One of her findings is that Palestinian "classification was also according to the degree of loyalty to the regime, or the suspicion of posing a security risk, which I call 'the axis of suspicion'. The classification and monitoring systems were critical because they enabled the colonial bureaucracy to use emergency laws as a practical tool of government."  

Berda claims that, "The attitude of the Israeli state apparatus towards the remainder of the Palestinian population blurred the boundaries between a security threat and a political threat, specifically regarding their status as an enemy population whose very citizenship was questioned until as late as 1952, when the Citizenship Law was passed."  Berda postulates that Israel confuses between Palestinian terrorism and Palestinian political activities. She claims that Israel's definition of the "boundaries of terrorism, make participation in political activity in general and public events in particular, a risky affair for minority populations already perceived as dangerous by the regime." Berda takes her argument further by claiming that "offenses for supporting, identifying with, and abetting terrorism, are defined so broadly (with terms like 'terrorist act', terrorist organization', and 'membership of a terrorist organization') that political identity, belonging to a particular community, or residence in an area designated as 'terrorist infrastructure', can be enough to suspend one’s right to due process."

Berda's conclusion is based on Oren Yiftachel's  2006 book, Ethnocracy: Land and identity politics in Israel/Palestin, as she ends by stating that the "legislation on political belonging and identity in Israel will enable a broad assault on the civil rights of not only Palestinians but also Jewish members of the opposition, changing the “ethnocratic” nature of the political regime." Berda suggests that the Israeli legislation will enable an assault on her and others for being the political opposition.

From an academic perspective, her teaching reflects her political activism.  Three course syllabi make a clear case:

 Her syllabus "Bureaucracy and State" The course "focuses on state bureaucracies, the institutional practices of the executive Branch and its political influence on the daily life of citizens. our premise is that organizations within state bureaucracy have great political power, that are not politically neutral. We will explore the bureaucracy of the state through a comparative lens and locate daily practices and routines that are created within particular historical, economic and cultural conditions and constraints (In Israel, US, India, The British and Ottoman Empires and more). We will learn to apply institutional and political theory to contemporary cases, particularly the relationship between bureaucracy, sovereignty and violations of citizens rights."

Her syllabus "Sociology of Law" is teaching that "The sociological approach to the law suggests looking at legal structures, how the law turns into culture and ideology, on the political and social power of institutions. In this course, we will learn, through current and sometimes urgent and controversial issues, about how law, social institutions and economic and political practices are building each other. The course is critical of the tradition of the "Law and Society" movement and seeks to challenge concepts that consider the law an independent system that is somehow disconnected from the country's political economy and social life. In addition, the Law and Society movement saw in the law as a significant tool for a broad social and political change, and throughout the course we will also discuss the range of possibilities for social change offered by the reading materials and discussions in the classroom."

Her course "Society in Israel" includes three field tours, The Supreme Court; Musrara - Following the Black Panthers; and The Politics of Archeology Tour of Silwan/City of David.  

Berda does not hide her ambition. In an interview about her return to Israel, Berda expressed her views, "I say to myself: 'Everything I do here is a contribution to both the policy and the way people perceive themselves.' I want to open people's mind to alternative thinking. People are afraid to open their mouths not to be accused for not  being loyal enough, and I want to be the person they meet and tell them that it is possible to live here and expect full equality of rights for Palestinians, and that it is possible to bridge the gaps. "It's very hard because all day you're busy explaining the obvious, but I have no doubt that my life here means a lot more. It's to take part in the struggles and be active. And it's not just me but my children who go to a bilingual school and study Arabic. It is not enough just to live here, we have to struggle. There is a great struggle for the future, and in the meantime the democratic camp is losing. Therefore, I choose to live here to influence."

Clearly, there is no reason why the taxpayers should sponsor political activism dressed as scholarship.





Comparative and Historical Sociology 
Section of the American Sociological Association
Trajectories 
Conference Report 
Empires, Colonies, Indigenous Peoples
Newsletter of the ASA Comparative and Historical Sociology 
 Section Vol 29 No 2 · Winter 2018
Legacies of Suspicion: From British Colonial Emergency Regulations to the ‘War on Terror’ in Israel and India 
Yael Berda Hebrew University 
For over a half century, Israel has relied on the Defense (Emergency) Regulations to thwart domestic threats, primarily targeting Palestinians in Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories (OPT). Though this set of colonial regulations began during the British Mandate of Palestine, a politically controversial Anti­ Terrorism Bill the Israeli Parliament passed in November 2016, transforms the draconian provisions of the emergency regulations into "regular" law. Ironically, the democratic process of formalizing and legitimizing anti­terrorism legislation may in fact sanction the sweeping curtailment of rights for all Israeli citizens, not just Palestinian Israelis. The institutionalization of counterinsurgency legislation is an important historical juncture, whereby a state's perception of security threats demarcates the scope of executive power as well as the fault lines between the boundaries of citizenship and what the regime considers national loyalty. In this paper, I conduct a critical comparison of the trajectory of colonial emergency regulations in India and in Israel, in order to highlight the role of institutionalization in legitimating civil rights violations by the state. In India, the emergency regulations became part of primary legislation (Singh 2007) shortly after independence. In Israel, the bill that formalized and incorporated powers of counterinsurgency into primary legislation only passed in 2016. 

How did this formalization influence the boundaries of bureaucratic activity that infringes upon civil rights for political and security needs? Political scientists and legal scholars have examined the history of emergency laws in cases when democratic principles have clashed with security needs in specific local conditions (Hofnung 2001), or when there is a an assumed "delicate balance" between human rights and state perceptions of "self­preservation" (Gross 2001). Brooks (2004) looked at how emergency laws were developed in the context of transnational partnerships in the global war on terror, focusing on the practices and technologies of “homeland security.” Some will argue that the legislative activities in both Israel and India are part of a global counter­terrorism phenomenon led by the United States. I present an alternative analysis that shows how the anti­terrorism bill encapsulates the emergency legacy of British colonialism (Hussain 2003) and produces a bureaucratic triple bind between security, loyalty and identity. By comparing India and Israel—two former British Empire territories where emergency regulations were used extensively—we can trace how contemporary anti­terrorism bills in both countries have strong similarities to their colonial predecessors. The historical development of the British toolkit of emergency regulations for managing population is inscribed into contemporary practices. Both the existing Indian laws and the new Israeli law harbor a similar organizational logic and the same spatial­ legal tools they inherited from colonial rule. These laws involve practices of identifying and classifying populations according to their level of hostility or the security risk they pose to the central regime, on an “axis of suspicion” (Berda, 2015). Today, these tools, initially developed by the interwar British Empire, are clearly distinct from the counterterrorism legislation in other states, including Britain (Pantazis and Pemberton 2009). Following the Defense of the Realm Act of 1914, the use of emergency regulations and decrees expanded into a repertoire of spatial­legal practices that proliferated across the British colonies and possessions. These practices became the colonial governments' main instrument of population management. Rather than being directed universally at the entire population, emergency laws targeted certain problematic or "dangerous" segments of the subject population. Although classifying populations was a central theme of British colonial governance (Singha 2000), the pace of classification accelerated when it came time to determine who would inhabit the territory in the future. The partition plans in India and in Palestine were intended to resolve inter­ communal conflicts. However, as is evident by the flurry of activity in the home ministry regarding documentation of domicile and residency, they also demanded swift bureaucratic classification of populations along clear categories of race, nationality and religion. One of my findings was that in addition to the preoccupation with population taxonomies, classification was also according to the degree of loyalty to the regime, or the suspicion of posing a security risk, which I call “the axis of suspicion”. The classification and monitoring systems were critical because they enabled the colonial bureaucracy to use emergency laws as a practical tool of government. India and Israel inherited the classification systems after independence, and thus the partition turned minorities in India and Palestinians in Israel into foreign and dangerous populations (Kemp 1999). The minority populations were perceived as hostile because they were on the “wrong” side of the border—they were supposed to be in the territory allocated by the partition plan, in a different state (Devi, 2013). As foreigners belonging to a separate political entity, minorities became suspects a priori and enemies de facto. The inheritance of British colonial emergency laws by the independent states included the institutional logic of managing dangerous populations and preventing insurgency by bureaucratic means, using the emergency defense regulations. In comparison to the partition of India, no  Palestinian state was ever established in Israel. The attitude of the Israeli state apparatus towards the remainder of the Palestinian population blurred the boundaries between a security threat and a political threat, specifically regarding their status as an enemy population whose very citizenship was questioned until as late as 1952, when the Citizenship Law was passed. The practicable rights of the Palestinian minority went into effect de facto only when the military regime was dismantled in 1966 (Boymel 2002). Despite the similarity in the legacies of emergency regulations in both India and Israel, the relationship between citizenship and security in the two countries evolved differently. In India, the inherited laws were used against all citizens, including members of the Hindu majority. In Israel, conversely, the laws targeted the subjects of the military regime who became Palestinian citizens of Israel. Emergency regulations were used against Jewish citizens only in a handful of cases. Looking at these cases as connected histories allows us to investigate the impact of institutional change on the legitimacy of state’s tools of counterinsurgency. As we shall see, institutional structures and trajectories of law affect legitimacy to use state violence, and shape the scope and depth of measures the state can use against its citizens. Studies on institutional legacies in former colonies, despite their rigor and theoretical innovations (for example Mahoney 2003; Lange 2009), have treated bureaucratic and legislative procedures as almost neutral variables, overlooking how bureaucratic practices and routines are not only outcomes of policies, but also actually produce political outcomes (Bourdieu 1994; Hull, 2012). In this article, the institutional perspective to the continuity of emergency laws that I introduce, reveals the links between security legislation, the "routinization of emergency" (Berda 2017), and citizenship in "aspiring" democracies. Relying on my observations of bureaucratic officials and their correspondence, I argue that the organizational mechanism utilized by the new states to create juridical and administrative continuity affected the legitimacy of using emergency legislation against civilians. A comparative study of emergency regulations in Israel and in India illuminates the inherent tension of the liberal principle of “the rule of law”. This binary principle (legal/illegal) attributes great importance to the manner in which laws are passed in democratic institutions. It gives procedural formalization the political legitimacy to infringe on civil rights, so long as the infringement abides by institutional standards (Lavi 2006). Yet the principle of the rule of law largely ignores the content of the laws, even when laws preserving security include potential infringement of civil and political rights to such a degree that democratic structure becomes hollow. The comparison evokes the dialectic relationship between the ostensibly democratic formalization of colonial defense regulations, and its contents. The formalization in India led to broader infringement of the rights of citizens across the board. In Israel, a patchwork of defense regulations led to the targeted and severe infringement of the rights of the Palestinian minority during the military regime of 1949 to 1967, and in the Occupied Palestinian Territories from 1967 onwards. The findings in this article are based on archival material from the Interior and Justice ministries in Israel and in India, following the first five years after independence (State Archives in Jerusalem, National Archives in New Delhi, and National Archives UK), and consisting primarily of organizational correspondence between officials. In the first part of the paper, I trace how the British Empire established the practices of policing and managing populations through emergency laws in the colonial era. Classification of populations transformed emergency regulations into a toolbox for preventing resistance to the regime. Legal analysis sees the declaration of emergency as a foundational moment of sovereignty—whether or not one accepts Carl Schmitt’s notorious definition of a sovereign as the one who charts the boundary between friend and a foe (1985). However, I demonstrate that labeling a population as friend or foe in the British colonies was not a moment, but a process (Shenhav 2012). Labeling the population as dangerous or hostile was the product of a set of bureaucratic practices that evolved over time. At the outset, such labeling was intended to control “security threats” during times of crisis, but emergency powers spawned an ever­expanding list of administrative categories that created a fluid interchangeability between those who were considered a security threat and those considered a political threat, through the routinization of emergency. I focus on the process of labeling populations through the creation of “blacklists” and the sorting of prisoners into “security” and “political" prisoners. The colonial regime, which fought against national liberation movements, saw some political activity as a security risk that endangered the existence of the regime. Used primarily during crisis, classification reinforced the institutional logic that blurred the official distinctions between political and paramilitary activities. Among its tools are administrative detention and spatial­legal limitations on movement. Classifying populations as suspicious was one of the counterinsurgency methods used in Ireland, India, Palestine, and other colonies (Khalili 2010). After independence, the newly independent states inherited this institutional logic—but each state took a different approach to formalizing these emergency powers. In the case of India, I focus on legal tools for coping with potential opposition to the regime. Such legal tools were incorporated quickly into primary legislation, including administrative detention, limitations on movement and the granting of special powers to security forces. In the Israeli case, I discuss the direct deployment of the defense emergency regulation in the permit system operated by the Israeli military government on the Palestinian citizens of Israel from 1949 to 1966. The final part of the paper discussed the last two decades of security legislation. Since the 1990s, emergency legislation, originally devised to govern subject populations threatening colonial regimes, has transformed into anti­terrorism and counterinsurgency legislation both in India and in Israel. The political partnership between the two states has intensified with the "global war on terror". The scaffolding of anti­terrorism legislation in both countries has three key principles, inherited from colonial legislation: broad discretion to security bureaucrats; limitations on movement; and spatial definition of entire geographical areas as "dangerous" areas or areas of “terrorist infrastructures.” In the Israeli bill (2016), the classification of populations as hostile is broadly construed to include kinship or geographic links sufficient to define a person as a terrorism supporter. In India, powers are enacted based on places defined as “disturbed areas”. In both cases, the legal­spatial definition blurs the boundaries between identity, belonging and security risk. Through these principles, the colonial logic of managing populations is a key component of the perception of “homeland security” practices in recent years in these two former colonies. Both in the Israeli and Indian laws, the broad legal­spatial definitions and vague terminology used to define the boundaries of terrorism, make participation in political activity in general and public events in particular, a risky affair for minority populations already perceived as dangerous by the regime. It differentiates the possible political repertoire for opposition and dissent by race. The offenses for supporting, identifying with, and abetting terrorism, are defined so broadly (with terms like “terrorist act”, “terrorist organization”, and “membership of a terrorist organization”) that political identity, belonging to a particular community, or residence in an area designated as “terrorist infrastructure”, can be enough to suspend one’s right to due process. Practically, defining entire populations as dangerous, because they live in a particular area or identify with a general political cause, strongly resembles population management by the British colonial regime. The criminalization of belonging is not confined to these cases, as law enforcement practices and bureaucratic repertoires deployed against opposition are differentiated by race in the US, for instance in Ferguson Missouri Police Department. Such legislation carries even greater force when it is enshrined in primary legislation. In such context, even a population within the state becomes a potential enemy—in legal and administrative terms—and finds itself at the receiving end of the same measures reserves for external enemies at times of war. The institutionalization of anti­terrorist legislation in both India and Israel, through its classificatory power, charts the boundaries of political membership. Anti­terrorism legislation redefines loyal citizenship because it transforms bureaucratic practices that blur the distinction between political threat and security threat from a temporary toolkit into permanent legislation. If it follows the path taken by India, then basing legislation on political belonging and identity in Israel will enable a broad assault on the civil rights of not only Palestinians but also Jewish members of the opposition, changing the “ethnocratic” nature of the political regime (Yiftachel 2006). 

References 
Berda, Yael. 2015. "Managing Dangerous Populations: From Colonial Emergency Laws to Anti Terror Laws in Israel and India." Theory and Criticism (Hebrew), 44. Berda, Yael. 2017. Living Emergency: Israel's Permit Regime in the Occupied West Bank. Stanford University Press.‏ Brooks, Rosa Ehrenreich. 2014. "War everywhere: rights, national security law, and the law of armed conflict in the age of terror." University of Pennsylvania Law Review 153(2): 675­761.‏ Boimel, Yair. 2002. "The Military Government and the Process of Its Abolition, 1958–1968." Ha­Mizrah Ha­ Hadash 43: 133­56.‏ Bourdieu, Pierre, and Samar Farage. 1994. "Rethinking the state: Genesis and structure of the bureaucratic field." Sociological Theory 12(1): 1­18. Hull, Matthew S. 2012. Government of paper: The materiality of bureaucracy in urban Pakistan. University of California Press. Hussain, Nasser. 2009. The jurisprudence of emergency: Colonialism and the rule of law. University of Michigan Press. Khalili, Laleh. 2010. "The location of Palestine in global counterinsurgencies." International Journal of Middle East Studies 42(3):413­433. Lavi, Shai. 2006. "The use of force beyond the liberal imagination: terror and empire in Palestine, 1947." Theoretical Inquiries in Law 7(1):199­228. Mahoney, James. 2003. "Long­run development and the legacy of colonialism in Spanish America." American Journal of Sociology 109(1):50­106. Pantazis, Christina, and Simon Pemberton. 2009. "From the ‘Old’ to the ‘New’ Suspect Community Examining the Impacts of Recent UK Counter­Terrorist Legislation." The British Journal of Criminology 49(5):646­666.‏ Schmitt, Carl. 1985. Political theology: Four chapters on the concept of sovereignty. University of Chicago Press. Singh, Ujjwal Kumar. 2007. The state, democracy and anti­terror laws in India. SAGE Publications India. Singha, Radhika. 2000. "Settle, mobilize, verify: identification practices in colonial India." Studies in History 16(2):151­198. Shenhav, Yehouda. 2012. "Imperialism, Exceptionalism and the Contemporary World." In Agamben and Colonialism. Edited by Svirsky and Bignall. Edinburgh University Press, 17­31. Yiftachel, Oren. 2006. Ethnocracy: Land and identity politics in Israel/Palestine. University of Pennsylvania Press. 
 Endnotes 
(1) Combatting Terrorism Law, 5776­2016, SEFER HAHUKIM [BOOK OF LAWS, the official gazette] 5776 No. 2556, p. 898 (2) The contemporary laws used are the Unlawful activities prevention act 1967, amended in 2008 http://mha.nic.in/hindi/sites/upload_files/mhahindi/files/pdf/UAPA­1967.pdf; Armed forces special powers act 1958 and others.







[ 144 ] The Insidious Power of Permits

Yael Berda, Living Emergency: Israel’s Permit Regime in the West Bank. 130 pages, acknowledgements and notes to  144. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2018. $12.99 paper.
Reviewed by Alex Winder
Those who study and experience the Israeli security apparatus are confronted with a certain tension. On the one hand, Israel seeks to refine its various technologies of surveillance and control to penetrate deeply into Palestinian society, to expand its reach in terms of both width and depth – that is, to assert control over as many people as possible and into as many aspects of each individual life as possible. The impression is of a totalizing effort. On the other hand, Israeli “security” is often unpredictable and arbitrary. When and where information is recorded and shared is unclear and restrictions can be enforced erratically and capriciously. How is it – or, more crucially, why is it – that such a system tends both toward totality and irregularity? Living Emergency, Yael Berda’s compelling, detailed, and theoretically sophisticated analysis of the Israeli permit regime, resolves this apparent paradox of Israeli securitization with the concept of “effective inefficiency.” Berda writes: 

Administrative flexibility, wide discretion, conflicting decisions, and changing decrees create constant administrative friction and uncertainty. While administratively inefficient, these characteristics of the population management control system achieve two important results for governing the West Bank: to create Palestinian dependency on the administrative system – to construct, maintain, and widen the scope of monitoring and control; and to create uncertainty, disorientation, and suspicion within Palestinian society through the prevention of mobility (35). 

The personal frustration of dealing with an  opaque and unpredictable bureaucratic regime is thus amplified and expanded to frustrate communal goals: economic self-sufficiency, national unity, and, ultimately, sovereignty. Inefficiency serves rather than hinders Israel’s totalizing security regime. 
            Berda’s significant contribution to understanding Israel’s permit regime is not just to explain its shifting purposes – that is, why it was put in place and evolved – but to examine in detail how it works – not just in theory, but in practice, for both Palestinians and Israelis. She is aided in this task by her previous experience as a lawyer in Israel, where she represented Palestinian clients classified as “security threats” and who were therefore denied permits. Berda opens and closes Living Emergency with revealing anecdotes from her legal practice, but the entire book is clearly informed by her attempts to maneuver within the permits system to access information (including about when, where, how, and by whom decisions were made) and produce change. Her extensive access to and interactions with the permit regime allow her to write with specificity and assert with authority that the examples she mobilizes “are not outliers but accumulated evidence of thousands of administrative interactions that are local yet over time became the mammoth institutional system I call the bureaucracy of the occupation” (12). Berda skillfully overlays these examples upon a framework rooted in history, political economy, and theoretical engagement with sovereignty, administration, and “emergency.” 
           Israel’s permit regime has its roots in the Defense (Emergency) Regulations enacted by the British Mandate administration in Palestine and quickly adapted by Israel after 1948 for the military rule of its Palestinian population. Berda’s focus is on the West Bank, however, and thus the bulk of her analysis focuses on the period after 1967, when Israel occupied the West Bank and Gaza Strip. In the wake of the 1967 war, the West Bank and Gaza Strip were declared a “closed military zone” and, after a census taken in September 1967, every Palestinian resident sixteen years of age and older was required to register and carry an identification card. These actions are representative of the three powerful tools that Israel uses to control the Palestinian population: emergency laws, classification of the population, and spatial closure. The 1968 Entry to Israel Directive required Palestinians crossing from the West Bank and Gaza Strip into pre-1967 Israel – whether for work, medical care, family visits, education, or any other number of reasons – to obtain a permit issued by the regional military commander. In 1972, Israel’s Ministry of Defense declared a “general exit permit” for West Bank and Gaza residents to pre-1967 Israel between 5:00 a.m. and midnight – largely to facilitate flows of low-wage Arab labor that Israeli employers could exploit – while maintaining the West Bank and Gaza Strip’s status as a “closed military zone,” thus allowing Israel to use curfews, deportations, and denial of entry to target individuals or communities considered active in political or military resistance (20–21). In 1968, 6 percent of the Palestinian labor force worked in Israel; six years later, this figure reached 32 percent. By the time Israel entered into negotiations with the Palestinian Liberation Organization in the early 1990s, the Palestinian economy was locked into a relationship of dependency on Israeli employment. 
           The 1993 Oslo accords reconfigured the system of population control in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, of which the permit regime was a cornerstone. As some aspects of control within the territories occupied in 1967 were handed to the fledgling Palestinian Authority, [ 146 ] The Insidious Power of Permits measures to control movement between these territories and those across the Green Line (as the 1949 armistice line that served as Israel’s de facto border until 1967, is known) expanded. The “general exit permit” was done away with, and permits became necessary for any and all Palestinian movement into pre-1967 Israel. Given the dependence of Palestinians’ livelihoods on freedom of movement across the Green Line, the permit regime became “a powerful economic weapon for population management through distinction between labor and political status” (24–25). Some commentators hailed the establishment of the Palestinian Authority as a step toward Palestinian sovereignty in the West Bank and Gaza, but, as Berda writes, “despite the structural shifts, the system for the Civil Administration’s management of the Palestinian population, the security forces, and the degree of interest Israel took in the activities of that population (particularly on the intelligence-gathering level) only grew” (28). A downsized Civil Administration became more, not less, colonial; and shifting aspects of Palestinian civil affairs to the Palestinian Authority increased the power of Israel’s General Security Service (better known as the Shin Bet) vis-à-vis the Civil Administration. In sum, the Oslo accords “ended Palestinian free labor movement across borders and directed such flows to suit Israeli security considerations” (82). 
           The power of the Shin Bet only intensified with the breakdown of negotiations and the outbreak of the second intifada, at which point every resident of the West Bank came to be seen as a potential security threat. Between October 2000 and 2005, the Shin Bet classified more than two hundred thousand Palestinians as “security threats” and the police classified sixty thousand more as “criminal security threats.” In 2007, approximately 20 percent of the male population between sixteen and fifty-five were classified as “security threats.” Of course, as Berda makes clear: 
“Security threat” was not a stable category; it was a fluctuating matrix of profiles sometimes based on age, gender, region, family, village, political affiliation, or intelligence information. As the blacklist expanded, so did the indices and measures of the security threat profile, which remained classified and unavailable to all agents of the bureaucracy except the agents of the Shin Bet (48). 
With no clear criteria defining what could lead to being classified a “security threat,” and the knowledge that being thus labeled was largely irreversible, Palestinians understandably sought to avoid any and all activities and personal associations that could conceivably lead to being denied a permit. This “generated a sense of paralysis and confusion,” Berda writes. “The strongest effect of the restriction that remained constant across hundreds of people I questioned was the chilling effect on political activity and a belief that political participation and active citizenship would be criminalized and penalized by the Shin Bet or the Israeli military” (53). Israel also turned to closure as a method to punish the Palestinians for their uprising and asphyxiate its support among the population. In 2004, the West Bank experienced 240 days of closure. Such limitations on movement only increased the value of permits, and the considerable discretion wielded by Israeli administrators in granting permits, denying  permits, and imposing closure gave them enormous leverage over the lives of Palestinians. 
           Berda describes the permits system as a regime of privilege, not of rights, within which Palestinian lives were subject to the whims of Israeli officials, who were powerfully placed to trade on these privileges. In particular, granting or denying permits became tools in the recruitment of informants and collaborators. Put crudely, the Shin Bet was willing to trade permits for information. Not only did Israel pressure some Palestinians to accept this devil’s bargain, but it also succeeded in generating fear and suspicion within Palestinian society, with devastating individual and communal repercussions. For individuals: “accepting collaboration means betraying your community and nation as well as risking you and your family’s lives; declining can end any possibility of earning a living once and for all, relinquishing hope for economic survival” (69). Collectively, knowledge that Israel employs such methods breeds distrust within Palestinian society: the receipt of a permit – especially if one had previously been denied – raises suspicions of collaboration. The opacity of the process in combination with the practice of recruitment leads to paranoia, and sometimes attribution of fantastic superpowers to the Israeli security forces. The result, again, is a chilling effect on Palestinian political life. 
           Berda is also adept at exploring Israeli dimensions of the permit regime. This includes the rivalry and shifting power dynamics between the Civil Administration and the Shin Bet, as well as the involvement of Israeli courts, including the High Court of Israel, in sustaining the permit regime. It also includes less prominent institutions, such as the Payments Section of the Interior Ministry’s Population, Immigration, and Border Crossings Authority, whose workings Berda uses to “illustrate how institutional routines create repertoires of uncertainty” (86). Berda includes a flowchart to map the convoluted interactions between Israeli employers, Palestinian employees, the Shin Bet, the police, middlemen, the Payments Section, the Ministry of Economy, the Civil Administration, and the Coordinator of Government Activities in the Territories (COGAT). These overlapping sites of authority make it nearly impossible to locate decision makers within the system and feed into the personalization of decision-making. Berda writes, “approaching different clerks at different times by different applicants produced different outcomes because outcomes were the result of the identity of the decision maker, not of stable and standardized practices. This occurs despite meticulously detailed internal procedures that exist on paper, thus creating a fake transparency of governance through documents” (92–93). This frustrates Israeli employers – who are thus disinclined to hire Palestinian labor, even if this would otherwise be their preference – and fuels an informal economy around permits. 
           The informal permit economy is driven by middlemen, who thrive in an environment of opacity, confusion, and personalism. Where both Israeli employers and Palestinian workers find themselves stymied by an impenetrable labyrinthine bureaucracy, these middlemen, through personal connections and knowledge of institutional intricacies, are able to facilitate the issuance of permits – for the right price, of course. The power of the middleman is thus rooted in the inefficiencies of the permits system; his “livelihood depended on the illegibility of the labor permit process. His expertise was invaluable as long as there were no systematic practices one could count on” (96). The thriving black market for permits subjects Palestinians to yet another layer of exploitation. In 2014, the Israeli workers’ rights [ 148 ] The Insidious Power of Permits organization Kav LaOved estimated that one-quarter of Palestinian workers with permits had paid employers or middlemen for them. The lax prosecution of forgery and bribery in this informal economy, meanwhile, gives the lie to the security justification of Israel’s permit regime. Instead, Berda cogently concludes: 
The bureaucratic cruelty of the permit regime, the disorganized mayhem that caused such suffering and despair, was incredibly efficient for achieving institutional and legal segregation between Jews and Palestinians, creating disorientation and atomization that turned life in the West Bank into a daily struggle within a perpetual emergency (109).
Finally, though Living Emergency focuses on the development and impact of the permit regime in the West Bank, part of its power derives from Berda’s de-exceptionalization of Israel/Palestine. She acknowledges that the West Bank permit regime is an “extreme,” not a “representative,” case, but “it does reveal the institutional logic of other systems throughout the world to control and monitor populations through classifications of security” (9). European governments and the United States increasingly subscribe to a securitized approach that blurs the lines between terrorism, crime, immigration, and labor, with Israel often serving either explicitly or implicitly as a model in this regard. (The revelation that the acting deputy director of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcemnt was part of a delegation of U.S. officials to a “National Counter Terrorism Institute Seminar” in Israel is only a recent example of this phenomenon.) Those who seek to challenge this phenomenon globally might also look to Israel, therefore, for lessons on how to combat the encroachment of securitized bureaucracy more effectively. Berda’s assessment in this regard is sobering. In the book’s powerful epilogue, she recalls realizing the futility of her efforts to combat the permit regime as a lawyer. “Even when we won the case, we lost,” Berda writes, “as each case created more regulations, crafted better answers for the Civil Administration, and highlighted gray areas and loopholes for the secret service” (127–28). The bureaucracy of the occupation is like a hydra: each time a head is cut off, multiple others grow back in its place. Berda’s hope is drawn from those whom she served as a lawyer, the “security threats” whose resilience and sheer humanity inspired her faith “in the possibility to change [Israel’s] political regime and demand citizenship and equal rights for all the inhabitants from the Jordan River to the sea” (129). Where legal solutions are insufficient, political solutions point the way forward. This entails recognizing that labor rights, freedom of movement, and transparent governance are intertwined, and that all must be defended rigorously from the justification of “security” that seeks to undermine them. Yael Berda’s Living Emergency is indispensable reading to better understand the proliferation and bureaucratization of securitization and to recognize the enormity of the struggle ahead to undo its pernicious effects, in Palestine and beyond.

Alex Winder is associate editor of Jerusalem Quarterly and visiting assistant professor of Middle East Studies at Brown University. He received his PhD in history and Middle Eastern and Islamic studies from New York University.



================================



Title change: How Security Laws Make Citizenship: The Institutional Legacies of the British Empire in Anti-Terror Laws in Israel and India

Date: 

Tuesday, October 17, 2017, 4:00pm to 6:00pm

Location: 

CMES, Rm 102, 38 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138

The CES Colonial Encounters & Divergent Trajectories in the Mediterranean Study Group
presents

Yael Berda
Academy Scholar, Harvard Academy for International & Regional Studies, WCFIA, Harvard University; Asst Professor, Department of Sociology & Anthropology, Hebrew University

[Previous title: Imperial legacies of suspicion: Making 'loyal' administrators and citizens in Israel/Palestine and India – the first decade]

Abstract: The proliferation of anti-terrorism and counter insurgency laws are often embedded within the contemporary discourse of “the global war on Terror” and practices of homeland security. Security laws are rarely viewed as the sites in which state bureaucracies participated in the construction of citizenship and loyalty to the state. Yet, as these laws define security threats, they also define the limits of legitimate political opposition. Last year, Israel introduced an anti-terrorism law, a process that offers an opportunity to challenge the contemporary discourse by offering an alternative legal history about the colonial origins of these security laws and their relation to citizenship. In this paper, Dr. Berda discloses an alternative analysis of the ways the anti-terrorism bill encapsulates the use of emergency laws in the British Empire. She argues that this legal toolkit enshrines a triple bind between security, loyalty and identity, which the state fashions through bureaucratic means. Through a comparative study security laws in Israel and India, she shows how the British colonial roots of security practices, focused on population management and its classification as loyal to the state, or suspicious, formed the boundaries of citizenship after independence. She argues that the institutionalization of British colonial emergency laws, which occurred differently in Israel and India, deeply impacted the scope and authority of executive power to justify consistent violation to civil rights.   

Dr. Yael Berda is currently an Assistant Professor of Sociology & Anthropology, Hebrew University, and an Academy Scholar, the Harvard Academy for International & Regional Studies, WCFIA. She received her PhD from Princeton University; MA from Tel Aviv University and  LLB from Hebrew University faculty of Law. Berda was a practicing Human Rights lawyer, representing in military, district and Supreme courts in Israel. Her second book Living Emergency: Israel's permit regime in the West Bank is forthcoming in November 2017 (Stanford University Press): http://www.sup.org/books/title/?id=25698. At Harvard, Berda is working on a book manuscript entitled: "The File and the Checkpoint: the Administrative memory of the British Empire in Israel, India & Cyprus". Her other research projects are about the construction of loyalty of civil servants in Israel and India, the use of emergency laws to shape political economy of colonial states, and colonial legacies of law and administration that shape contemporary homeland security practices in postcolonial states. Berda publishes, teaches and speaks on the intersections of sociology of law, bureaucracy and the state, race and racism and sociology of empires here: https://scholars.huji.ac.il/yaelberda/home.

Sponsors: Center for European Studies, Center for Middle Eastern Studies
Contact: Liz Flanagan








https://ces.fas.harvard.edu/events/2017/10/how-security-laws-make-citizenship-the-institutional-legacies-of-the-british-empire-in-anti-terror-laws-in-israel-and-india

Institutional Legacies of the British Empire in Anti-Terror Laws in Israel and India
October 17, 2017
4:00pm - 6:00pm
CMES, Rm 102, 38 Kirkland St, Cambridge, MA 02138
SPEAKER
Academy Scholar, Harvard Academy for International & Regional Studies, WCFIA, Harvard University; Assistant Professor, Department of Sociology & Anthropology, Hebrew University

** Event Location: Please note that this event is not held at CES. Consult the event details above for the correct location. **

For paper please email Gabriel Koehler-Derrick at: koehlerderrick@g.harvard.edu

About

The proliferation of anti-terrorism and counter insurgency laws are often embedded within the contemporary discourse of “the global war on Terror” and practices of homeland security. Security laws are rarely viewed as the sites in which state bureaucracies participated in the construction of citizenship and loyalty to the state. Yet, as these laws define security threats, they also define the limits of legitimate political opposition. Last year, Israel introduced an anti-terrorism law, a process that offers an opportunity to challenge the contemporary discourse by offering an alternative legal history about the colonial origins of these security laws and their relation to citizenship. In this paper, Dr. Berda discloses an alternative analysis of the ways the anti-terrorism bill encapsulates the use of emergency laws in the British Empire. She argues that this legal toolkit enshrines a triple bind between security, loyalty and identity, which the state fashions through bureaucratic means. Through a comparative study security laws in Israel and India, she shows how the British colonial roots of security practices, focused on population management and its classification as loyal to the state, or suspicious, formed the boundaries of citizenship after independence. She argues that the institutionalization of British colonial emergency laws, which occurred differently in Israel and India, deeply impacted the scope and authority of executive power to justify consistent violation to civil rights.

Sponsors


 
=================================================





בגלל הפוליטיקה
"המחנה הדמוקרטי בישראל מפסיד במאבק על העתיד, לכן אני כאן - כדי להשפיע"

יעל ברדה

דוקטור לסוציולוגיה, מרצה באוניברסיטה העברית. בת 42, חזרה בשנה שעברה מכשנתיים בארצות הברית (וקודם לכן היתה שלוש שנים נוספות)

גרושה ואם לשניים (בני 8 ו?4), 
חיה בירושלים

"נסעתי לארצות הברית לדוקטורט בפרינסטון ופוסט?דוקטורט בהרווארד. היו לי אופציות מאוד מפתות לג'ובים בארצות הברית, כולל אופציה בהרווארד. גם אחרי שגמרתי את הפוסט נסעתי להרווארד להעביר קורס, ובשנה הבאה אסע לשם שוב לחצי שנה, כך שזו עדיין אופציה קיימת. לדברים שבהם אני מתעניינת מקצועית יש יותר קונים שם: אני מתמחה בסוציולוגיה היסטורית ובחקר הביורוקרטיה של האימפריה הבריטית בהודו, ישראל, קפריסין ואפריקה, ואני מלמדת סוציולוגיה של אימפריות וסוציולוגיה טרנס?לאומית, אלה נושאים שמתעניינים בהם בעיקר בהרווארד ובקולומביה. כך שמבחינה מקצועית, ההזדמנויות נמצאות בחו"ל, יש שם אופציות טובות יותר כלכלית, ויותר פרסום. בארץ קריירה אקדמית זו מלחמת עולם, צריך להילחם קשה.

"ובכל זאת בחרתי לחיות בישראל, וחזרתי למשרה באוניברסיטה העברית. ההורים שלי כאן, והם מבוגרים. האחיות שלי כאן, החברים הכי טובים שלי כאן. ואני ירושלמית, ואני ים?תיכונית. אני מחוברת לתרבות הזאת, שייכת לכאן.

"בארץ אני גם מרגישה את המוביליות החברתית שלי, של זו שהצליחה להגיע מהשכונה לאוניברסיטה, להבדיל מארצות הברית שבה אני שייכת לאליטה האקדמית. ואני מחוברת לאזור הזה, שבו אנשים נהנים גם לחיות ולא רק לעבוד, שקהילה היא דבר משמעותי, ושהפוליטיקה חיה.

"כי מעבר להכל, אני רוצה לעשות שינוי. אני רוצה שינוי בנושא של שוויון ופערים כלכליים, וזו פוליטיקה שהיא עולמית, אבל התרומה שלי בישראל יכולה להיות משמעותית הרבה יותר מבמקומות אחרים בעולם. אני יכולה לדמיין כאן מקום שהוא דמוקרטיה, שיאפשר לעצמו להיות מה שהוא יכול להיות, ואני יכולה לעזור לזה לקרות. בכל מקום אחר בעולם אני יכולה להיות עוד אדם שרוצה לצמצם פערים, אבל בישראל, במיוחד בהסלמה של התקופה האחרונה — חוק הלאום, הפונדקאות, ההתעמרות בעניים ובנכים —

אני אומרת לעצמי: 'כל דבר שאני אעשה כאן הוא תרומה גם למדיניות וגם לאופן שבו אנשים חושבים על עצמם'. אני מעוניינת לפתוח לאנשים את הראש לחשיבה אלטרנטיבית. אנשים מפחדים לפתוח את הפה כדי שלא יגידו שהם לא מספיק נאמנים, ואני רוצה להיות האדם שהם יפגשו ויאמר להם שאפשר לחיות כאן ולרצות שוויון זכויות מלא לפלסטינים, ושאפשר לצמצם פערים.

"זה נורא קשה, כי כל היום אתה עסוק בלהסביר את המובן מאליו, אבל אין לי ספק שמשמעות החיים שלי פה גדולה הרבה יותר. זה לקחת חלק במאבקים ולהיות פעילה. וזה לא רק אני אלא גם הילדים שלי, שהולכים לבית ספר דו?לשוני ולומדים ערבית. זו לא חוכמה רק לגור פה, צריך להיאבק. יש פה מאבק גדול על העתיד, ובינתיים המחנה הדמוקרטי מפסיד. כך שכן, אני בוחרת לחיות כאן כדי להשפיע".
ראיונות: ארי ליבסקר
=================================================

Facebook © 2018
‎A Land for All ארץ לכולם بلاد للجميع‎'s photo.
DEC
17
גדרות טובות עושות שכנים טובים? الأسوار الجيدة تخلق جيرانا جيدين?
Public · Hosted by ‎A Land for All ארץ לכולם بلاد للجميع‎
Monday, 17 December 2018 from 19:30-22:00
about 1 week ago
קרן רוזה לוקמסבורג, שדרות רוטשילד 11, תל אביב

Details
?גדרות טובות יוצרות שכנים טובים?? איך שיח ההפרדה משפיע על הסיכויים לפיוס?
"الأسوار الطيبة تخلق جيرانا جيدين"؟ كيف يؤثر الفصل على فرص المصالحة?

מדיניות ההפרדה הנחתה את כל ממשלות ישראל ועומדת בבסיס רב הפתרונות המוצעים להסכם עם הפלסטינים. אם רק נבנה עוד חומה, אם נתגרש, אם נהיה אנחנו פה והם שם, הכל יפתר. האמנם?  
سياسة الفصل هي التي توجه حكومات إسرائيل وهي قائمة في صلب معظم الحلول المقترحة للسلام مع الفلسطينيين. فإذا اقمنا سورًا آخر، وإذا انفصلنا، وأن نكون نحن هنا وهم هناك، عندها سيتم حل كل شيء. أحقًا؟

במציאות יש לשיח ההפרדה גם השלכות קשות על יצירת אמון, מחויבות ושותפות ולכן על היכולת להגיע להסכם אמיתי. בואו לשמוע ולהשמיע את דעתכםן!
في الواقع ثمّة اسقاطات قاسية لخطاب الفصل على بناء الثقة، والالتزام والشراكة، وكذلك  على قدرة التوصل لاتفاق حقيقي. ندعوكم لإسماع موافقكم!

17 בדצמבר 2018, משרדי קרן רוזה לוקסמבורג, שדרות רוטשילד 11, תל אביב.
17 كانون الأول 2018، مكاتب مؤسسة روزا لوكسمبوغ، جادة روتشيلد 11، تل أبيب.

19:30 התכנסות ודברי פתיחה
19:30 تجمع وكلمات افتتاحية

20:00 פאנל דוברים ודוברות בהנחיית מירון רפופורט:
20:00 جلسة حوارية بين متحدثات ومتحدثين، يرأس الجلسة ميرون راپوپورت:

ד"ר יעל ברדה, החוג לסוציולוגיה ואנתרופולוגיה, האוניברסיטה העברית, עו"ד ופעילה חברתית.
د. ياعيل بردا، قسم العلوم الاجتماعية والأنثروبولوجيا، الجامعة العربية، ومحامية مجتمعية نشطة.

ג'עפר פרח,  פעיל חברתי ופוליטי ומנהל מרכז מוסאוא לזכויות האזרחים הערבים בישראל.
جعفر فرح، ناشط اجتماعي وسياسي ومدير مركز مساواة لحقوق المواطنين العرب في إسرائيل

שקד מורג, מנכ"לית שלום עכשיו.
شكيد مورغ، مديرة عام حركة سلام الآن

================================================================


האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים
סילבוס
חברה בישראל - 53106 
תאריך עדכון אחרון 21-02-2017
נקודות זכות באוניברסיטה העברית: 4
תואר: בוגר
היחידה האקדמית שאחראית על הקורס: סוציולוגיה ואנתרופולוגיה
סמסטר: סמסטר ב'
שפת ההוראה: עברית
קמפוס: הר הצופים
מורה אחראי על הקורס (רכז): דר יעל ברדה
דוא"ל של המורה האחראי על הקורס: yael.berda@mail.huji.ac.il
שעות קבלה של רכז הקורס: יום ג', 10:30-12
מורי הקורס: 
ד"ר יעל ברדה
תאור כללי של הקורס: 
הקורס יציג מגוון של שאלות וגישות סוציולוגיות לניתוח החברה בישראל. כך למשל נדון בנושאים הבאים: מה היא יחידת הניתוח של הקורס? מי היא "החברה הישראלית"? מה היא הישראליות והיכן נדע אותה. מה הם גבולותיה של יחידת הניתוח של הקורס? איך נראה אי שיווין בישראל? איך ישראל ממוקמת יחסית לעולם? האם החברה בישראל היא יחידה מונוליתית (להלן "החברה הישראלית") או שהיא מורכבת משבטים? האם יש תרבות ישראלית? ומה הם היחסים שבין הדת והמדינה? הקורס יבחן שאלות ומקרי מחקר מגוונים ויגלה עניין בנתונים השוואתיים שונים ומשמעותם. במקביל יעגן הקורס את הסוגיות העולות בו בהקשרים היסטוריים, חברתיים ופוליטיים. 

מטרות הקורס: 
2. מפגש עם היבטים נבחרים של החברה בישראל ובחינתם לאור גישות ניתוח סוציולוגיות ודגש על הקשר היסטורי-תרבותי. 
3. הבנה של מבנה ותרבות של החברה בישראל. 
4. הקניית יכולת חשיבה ביקורתית, הבנה וניתוח של מגמות ותופעות עכשוויות והיסטוריות בחברה בישראל. 

תוצרי למידה : 
בסיומו של קורס זה, סטודנטים יהיו מסוגלים: 
1. להבין, להסביר, לפרש ולנתח סוגיות עבר והווה בחברה בישראל כמו גם תהליכי עומק בחברה. 
2. ליישם תאוריות וגישות סוציולוגיות הנלמדות בקורס על המציאות החברתית של ישראל. 
3. לנתח, להבין ולפרש תהליכים חברתיים המתרחשים בחברה בישראל, ולהציע קשרים בין נושאים שונים הנלמדים בקורס, כמו גם בקורסים אחרים 
4. להכיר טוב יותר את המרחב החברתי שבו הסטודנטים לומדים. 

דרישות נוכחות (%): 
70%

שיטת ההוראה בקורס: הוראה פרונטלית + שלושה סיורי שטח 
כתיבת דוחות קריאה 
כתיבת עבודה מסכמת 
1. בית המשפט העליון 
2. מוסררה - בעקבות הפנתרים השחורים 
3. הפוליטיקה של הארכיאולוגיה סיור בסילואן/עיר דוד

רשימת נושאים / תכנית הלימודים בקורס: 
גישות לחקר חברה בישראל 
שאלת 1948 ומושג הממלכתיות 
הממשל הצבאי 
אזרחות בישראל 
מעברות וקרקעות: מרד ואדי סליב 
מעברות וקרקעות 
שנות השישים: משפט אייכמן ומאבק השילומים 
הפנתרים השחורים 
שס 
מלחמת 1967 ושאלת הגבולות 
הקמת גוש אמונים 
המהפכה החוקתית של מי? 
שנות השמונים: גזענות פנים וחוץ 
הסכמי אוסלו והגירה גלובלית 
הסכמי אוסלו : שלום ובטחון ? 
דתיים: מסורתיים וחרדים 
אינתיפדת אל אקצא וההתנתקות 
כלכלת ישראל 
המחאה החברתית 


חומר חובה לקריאה: 
קריאת חובה: 
רם אורי, 2006. הזמן של הפוסט: לאומיות והפוליטיקה של הידע בישראל, רסלינג, עמ' 114-71. 

הרצוג חנה, 2000. "כל שנה יכולה להיחשב כשנה הראשונה", תיאוריה וביקורת 17, עמ' 154-149. 
קריאת חובה: 
שפיר גרשון, 1993. "קרקע, עבודה ואוכלוסייה בקולוניזציה הציונית: היבטים כלכליים וייחודיים", בתוך: רם אורי (עורך), החברה הישראלית: היבטים ביקורתיים, תל אביב: ברירות, עמ' 119-104. 

מוריס בני, 1991. לידתה של בעיית הפליטים הפלסטינים: 1949-1947, תל אביב: עם עובד, ע' 396-382. 

אופיר עדי, 1998 "שעת האפס", תיאוריה וביקורת 13-12, עמ', 32-15. 
קמפ אדריאנה, 1999. "שפת המראות של הגבול: גבולות טריטוריאליים וכינונו של מיעוט לאומי בישראל", סוציולוגיה ישראלית 2(1), עמ' 349-319. 

כהן, הלל. 2006. ערבים טובים המודיעין הישראלי והערבים בישראל: סוכנים ומפעילים, משת"פים ומורדים, מטרות ושיטות הוצאת עברית, עמ' 
קריאת חובה: 
יפתחאל אורן, 1993. "מודל 'הדמוקרטיה האתנית' ויחסי יהודים-ערבים בישראל: היבטים גיאוגרפיים, היסטוריים ופוליטיים", אופקים בגיאוגרפיה 38-37: עמ' 59-51. 

ברקוביץ ניצה, 1999 '''אשת חיל מי ימצא?''' נשים ואזרחות בישראל'' סוציולוגיה ישראלית ב (1), ע' 277-317. 

Rozin Orit, 2011. "Negotiating the right to exit the country in 1950s Israel: Voice, loyalty, and citizenship." The Journal of Israeli History 30.01: 1-22. 

אורן יפתחאל ואלכסנדר קידר, "על עוצמה ואדמה: משטר המקרקעין הישראלי" תיאוריה וביקורת, עמ' 16-67. 

דהאן-כלב הנרייט, 1998. "מאורעות ואדי סליב", תיאוריה וביקורת 13-12, עמ', 158-149. 
כזום, עזיזה. 1999; "תרבות מערבית, תיוג אתני וסגירות חברתית: הרקע לאי-השוויון האתני בישראל", סוציולוגיה ישראלית א(2) , ע' 385-428. 

סבירסקי שלמה וברנשטיין דבורה, 1993. "מי עבד במה עבור מי ותמורת מה? הפיתוח הכלכלי של ישראל והתהוות חלוקת העבודה העדתית" בתוך: אורי רם (עורך), החברה הישראלית: היבטים ביקורתיים, תל אביב: ברירות הוצאה לאור, עמ' 147-120. 

אבורביעה קווידר, סראב. 2005. "מתמודדות מתוך שוליות: שלושה דורות של נשים בדואיות בנגב" בתוך נשים בדרום, מרחב, פריפריה, מגדר. עורכות הנרייט דהאן-כלב, ניצה ינאי וניצה ברקוביץ. מכון בן-גוריון והוצאת הספרים של אוניברסיטת בן-גוריון בנגב: חרגול הוצאה לאור. 86-108 
זרטל עידית, 1998. "חנה ארנדט נגד מדינת ישראל", תיאוריה וביקורת 13-12, עמ', 168-159. 

ויץ יחיעם, 1998. "תנועת החרות נגד השילומים מגרמניה", תיאוריה וביקורת 13-12, עמ', 112-99. 

שטרית סמי שלום, 2004. המאבק המזרחי בישראל: בין דיכוי לשחרור, בין הזדהות לאלטרנטיבה, תל אביב. פרק שלישי: או שהעודה תהיה לכולם או שלא תהיה עוגה – הפנתרים השחורים. עמ' 119-186 

ינון כהן. 1998. "פערים סוציו-אקונומיים בין מזרחים לאשכנזים 1975-1995" סוציולוגיה ישראלית א (1): 115-134 
Yadgar, Yaacov, “SHAS as a Struggle to Create a New Field: A Bourdieuan Perspective of an Israeli Phenomenon”. Sociology of Religion 64(2), pp. 223-246, 2003. 
שנהב יהודה, 2010. במלכודת הקו הירוק, תל אביב: עם עובד. עמ' 9-38. 

גוטויין דניאל 2004. "הערות על היסודות המעמדיים של הכיבוש", תיאוריה וביקורת 24, ע' 203 -211. 
פישר, שלמה. 2007. "הפרדיגמה הפונדמנטליסטית ומה שמעבר לה: חקר הציונות הדתית הרדיקלית בשלושת העשורים האחרונים של המאה העשרים." תיאוריה וביקורת גיליון 31. 

פייגה מיכאל, 2002 שתי מפות לגדה: גוש אמונים, שלום עכשיו ועיצוב המרחב בישראל י-ם: מאגנס 
רונן שמיר, 1994. "הפוליטיקה של הסבירות" תיאוריה וביקורת 5, ע"מ 7 – 23 . 

מאוטנר, מנחם 1994. "הסבירות של הפוליטיקה" תיאוריה וביקורת 5 ע"מ 25-53 ‬‬‬ 

הרצוג חנה, לייקין אינה ושרון סמדר, 2008. "אנחנו גזענים?! שיח הגזענות כלפי הפלסטינים אזרחי ישראל כפי שהוא משתקף בעיתונות הכתובה בעברית (2000-1949)", בתוך: שנהב יהודה ויונה יוסי (עורכים), גזענות בישראל, תל אביב: הקיבוץ המאוחד; ירושלים: מכון ון ליר. 

קופ, יעקב,2010. "אליה וקוץ בה: תכנית הייצוב 1985 ושיטת חוק ההסדרים שנלוותה לה", בתוך: בתוך דבורה הכהן ומשה ליסק (עורכים), צומתי הכרעות ופרשיות מפתח בישראל, שדה בוקר: אוניברסיטת בן-גוריון, עמ' 261-238 

יונה יוסי, 2000. "מדיניות קרקע ודיור: מגבלותיו של שיח האזרחות", תיאוריה וביקורת 16, עמ' 129- 151. 
קמפ אדריאנה ורייכמן רבקה, 2006. עובדים וזרים, תל אביב: הקיבוץ המאוחד; ירושלים: מכון ון ליר, מבוא – 9-21. 

שרה הלמן, 2014. "כיצד קופאיות, מנקות ומטפלות סיעוד הפכו ליזמות: סדנאות מרווחה לעבודה וכינון העצמי הניאו-ליברלי", סוציולוגיה ישראלית, גיליון טו מס' 2 פברואר תשע"ד 

גודמן יהודה, 2008. "אזרחות, מודרניות ואמונה במדינת הלאום: הגזעה ודה-הגזעה בגיור מהגרים "רוסים" ו"אתיופים" בישראל", בתוך: שנהב יהודה ויונה יוסי (עורכים), גזענות בישראל תל אביב: הקיבוץ המאוחד; ירושלים: מכון ון ליר , עמ' 381- 415 
סמירה אסמיר, 2004. בשם הבטחון, מחברות עדאלה 4, ע"מ 2-8 

Kotef, Hagar. "Baking at the front line, sleeping with the enemy: reflections on gender and women's peace activism in Israel." Politics & Gender 7.04 (2011): 551-572. 

ורד ויניצקי-סרוסי, 2000. בין ירושלים לתל-אביב : הנצחתו של יצחק רבין ושיח הזהות הלאומית בישראל זיכרון במחלוקת - מיתוס, לאומיות ודמוקרטיה ע"מ 19-37‬‬ 

הוניידה ע'אנם,2017. מקובניה עד אל-בואריה: גנאלוגיה של ההמשגה הפלסטינית להתיישבות היהודית בפלסטין ישראל. תיאוריה וביקורת 47, ע"מ 15-40 

יעקב ידגר, 2010. מודרניות ללא חילון. הוצאת מכון שלום הרטמן, מבוא לספר 

תמר אלאור, (2010). החורף של הרעולות: כיסוי וגילוי, תיאוריה וביקורת 37: 68-38. 

פרידמן מנחם, 1990. "ואלה תולדות הסטטוס קוו: דת ומדינה בישראל", בתוך: פילובסקי ורדה (עורכת), המעבר מישוב למדינה 1947-1949: רציפות תמורות, חיפה: אוניברסיטת חיפה, מוסד הרצל לחקר הציונות, עמ' 558-542. 

שנקר יעל, 2017. לאחוז במרחב: ייצוגי ההתנתקות בקולנוע התיעודי ובשירה של הקהילה הדתית לאומית. תיאוריה וביקורת 47, ע"מ 181-202 

סיגל הורביץ, 2017. צדק מ?ע?ברי בהעדר מעבר: ועדת אור והשסע האתנו-לאומי בישראל. בתוך: ראיף זיר ואילן סבן (עורכים). משפט, מיעוט וסכסוך לאומי. ת"א: משפט וחברה ותרבות, ע"מ 251-289 

גיליס ריבי, 2017. האתניות כן עוצרת במחסום: לשאלת הזהות האתנית בהתנחלויות. תיאוריה וביקורת 47, ע"מ 41-64 
זאב רוזנהק ומיכאל שלו, 2013. "הכלכלה הפוליטית של מחאת 2011 : ניתוח דורי ומעמדי". תיאוריה וביקורת 41 

יהודה שנהב, 2013. "הקרנבל : מחאה בחברה ללא אופוזיציות." תיאוריה וביקורת 41 

חסן גבריאל, 2014. "הנכבה המשפט והנאמנות: הרגע ההובסיאני של הפלסטינים בישראל." תיאוריה וביקורת 42 


חומר לקריאה נוספת: 
רוזנטל רוביק (עורך), 2001. קו השסע– החברה הישראלית בין איחוי לקריעה, ת"א: ידיעות אחרונות. 
גביזון רות ודפנה הקר, 2000. השסע היהודי-ערבי בישראל: מקראה, המכון הישראלי לדמוקרטיה. 
זיסר ברוך ואשר כהן, 1999. מהשלמה להסלמה: השסע הדתי-חילוני בפתח המאה העשרים ואחת, ירושלים: הוצאת שוקן. 
ברנשטיין דבורה, 1999. "מה שרואים משם לא רואים מכאן: היבטים ותובנות בהיסטוריוגרפיה הישראלית", סוציולוגיה ישראלית ב(1), עמ' 50-23. 

הערכת הקורס - הרכב הציון הסופי : 
מבחן מסכם בכתב/בחינה בעל פה 0 %
הרצאה0 %
השתתפות 15 %
הגשת עבודה 55 %
הגשת תרגילים 0 %
הגשת דו"חות 30 %
פרויקט מחקר 0 %
בחנים 0 %
אחר 0 %
The Hebrew University 
Syllabus SOCIETY IN ISRAEL - 53106 
Last update 21-02-2017
HU Credits: 4
Degree/Cycle: 1st degree (Bachelor)
Responsible Department: sociology & soc. anthropology
Semester: 2nd Semester
Teaching Languages: Hebrew
Campus: Mt. Scopus
Course/Module Coordinator: Dr. Yael Berda
Coordinator Email: yael.berda@mail.huji.ac.il
Coordinator Office Hours: Tuesday 10:30-12:30
Teaching Staff: 
Dr. Yael Berda
Course/Module description: 
The course presents a set of sociological questions and approaches to the analysis of society in Israel. Thus, for example, we will discuss the following issues: What is the unit of analysis of the course? What is "Israeli society?" How can one define "Israeliness?" and how can one know it and study it? What are the boundaries of the unit of analysis called "Israeli society?" how does inequality in Israel look like? Ho does Israel rate vis-a-vie the world? What can one say about Israel in comparison? Is Israeli society a monolithic entity or is it composed of various "tribes" and fragments? Is there "Israeli Culture?" What are the relations between state and society in Israel? The course will analyze various questions and case studies and will anchor the discussion in comparative perspective. In addition, the course will anchor the discussed issues in historical, sociological and political contexts.

Course/Module aims: 
1. Introduction with the social-political-cultural history of society in Israel. 
2. learning and understanding the structure and culture of Israeli society 
3. Learning chosen/selected facets of Israeli society and analyze them in the context of sociological perspectives and theories while putting an emphasis on socio-cultural context. 
4. Providing the ability to think, analyze and understand historical and current phenomenon and challenges that are part and parcel of society in Israel. 

Learning outcomes - On successful completion of this module, students should be able to: 
1. Understand, explain, analyze and interpret past and current issues at the heart of society in Israel. The same goes for social cleavages that cut through society here. 
2. Apply sociological theories to Israel's social, financial, political and cultural reality. 
3. Analyze, understand and interpret social processes that take place in Israel and suggest how they relate to other disciplines and areas. 
4. to better understand the context in which the student live in 

Attendance requirements(%): 
70%

Teaching arrangement and method of instruction: Frontal Teaching

Course/Module Content: 
1. Perspective, discourse, point of view,periodization and categorization in analyzing society in Isarel. 
2. Theoretical approaches to the study of the society 
3. Ethnicity and Inequality in Israel. 
4. Israeli welfare state. 
5. Sacred times and spaces (on national holidays and beyond). 
6. Religion and religious groups 
7. Migrant workers in Israel. 
8. Culture in Israel 
9. Jerusalem. 

Required Reading: 
Aburaiya, Issam. 2004. "The 1996 Split of the Islamic Movement in Israel: Between the Holy Text and Israeli-Palestinian Context." International Journal of Politics, Culture and Society, Vol. 17, No. 3: 439-455. 
Azaryahu, Maoz. 1996. "Mount Herzl: the Creation of Israel's National Cemetery." Israel Studies 1(2): 46-74. ereserve. 
Bell, Daniel A., and Avner De-Shalit. 2013. "Jerusalem- the city of religion". Pp. 18-55. In 
The spirit of cities: Why the identity of a city matters in a global age. Oxsford: Princeton 
University Press. 
Levy, Yagil. 2014. "The Theocratization of the Israeli Military." Armed Forces & Society, 40(2), 
269-294. 
Masry-Herzalla, Asmahan and Eran Razin. 2014. "Israeli-Palestinian Migrants in Jerusalem: 
An Emerging Middleman Minority." Journal of Ethnic and Migration Studies 40(7): 1002-1022. 
Rabinowitz, Dan. 1997. "In and out of territory" Pp. 178-201 In Grasping Land. Edited by E. Ben-Ari and Y. Bilu, (ed), NY: SUNY Press. Pp. 178-201. DS 132 G73 
Shavit, Ari. 2013 .My promised land: The triumph and tragedy of Israel. Random House LLC.Pp. 71-98 (Chapter 4: Masada); 99-134 (Chapter 5: Lydda 1948); 175-200 (Chapter 7: The project, 1967) 

אייזנשטדט, שמואל נוח ודני רבינוביץ. 2007. "על לימודי ישראל, לימודי יהדות, מודרניזציה וגלובליזציה: סדרת שיחות." עמ' 481-494 בתוך דורות, מרחבים, זהויות: מבטים עכשוויים על חברה ותרבות בישראל, בעריכת ח' הרצוג, ט' כוכבי וש' צלניקר. ירושלים: מכון ון ליר והקיבוץ המאוחד. 
אלמלך, יובל ונח לוין-אפשטיין. 1998. "הגירה ושיכון בישראל: מבט נוסף על אי-שוויון אתני". מגמות, 
ל"ט (3): 243-270. 
אלחאג', מג'ד. 2000. "זהות ואוריינטציה בקרב הערבים בישראל: מצב של פריפריה כפולה." עמ' 13-33 בתוך השסע היהודי ערבי בישראל: מקראה, בעריכת ר' גביזון וד' הקר. ירושלים: המכון הישראלי לדמוקרטיה. אמית, קארין. 2005. "תקפות החלוקה האתנית למזרחים ולאשכנזים בקרב מהגרים וצאצאיהם בשוק 
העבודה הישראלי." מגמות: רבעון למדעי ההתנהגות, 44 (1): 3-28. 
ארנדט, חנה. 2000. אייכמן בירושלים: דו"ח על הבנאליות של הרוע. תל אביב: בבל, עמ' 10-29. 
דהן, מומי. 2013. " האם כור ההיתוך הצליח בשדה הכלכלי." ירושלים: הוצאת המכון הישראלי 
לדמוקרטיה והבית הספר למדיניות ציבורית האוניברסיטה העברית, 1-29. 
הורוביץ, דן ומשה ליסק. 1990. מצוקות באוטופיה: ישראל – חברה בעומס יתר. תל אביב: עם עובד, עמ' 40-68 [פרק שני]. 
הרצוג, חנה. 2000. "'כל שנה יכולה להיחשב כשנה הראשונה': הסדרי זמן וזהות בויכוח על שנות 
החמישים." תיאוריה וביקורת(17): 209-216. 
ויניצקי-סרוסי, ורד. 2000. "בין ירושלים לתל-אביב: הנצחתו של יצחק רבין ושיח הזהות הלאומית בישראל." עמ' 19-37 בתוך זיכרון במחלוקת: מיתוס, לאומיות ודמוקרטיה: עיונים בעקבות רצח רבין, בעריכת ל' גרינברג. באר שבע: מכון המפרי למחקר חברתי. עמ' 19-37. 
זרטל, עדית. 1999 "חנה ארנדט נגד מדינת ישראל." תיאוריה וביקורת 12-13 , עמ' 159-167. 
ידגר, יעקב וישעיהו ליבמן. 2006. "מעבר לדיכוטומיה דתי- חילוני: המסורתיים בישראל." עמ' 337-367 בתוך ישראל והמודרניות: למשה ליסק ביובלו, בעריכת א' כהן, א' בן רפאל, א' בראלי וא' יער. באר שבע: מכון בן גוריון לחקר ישראל. 
יפתחאל, אורן. 1999. "יום האדמה." תיאוריה וביקורת; 12-13: 279-289 (לא כולל העמודים הזוגיים) 
כהן, אשר. 2004. "ראשית צניחת גאולתנו – דעיכת הציונות הדתית במאבק על הזהות היהודית במדינת ישראל והשפעותיה לעתיד." עמ' 364-385 בתוך הציונות הדתית: עידן התמורות, בעריכת א' כהן וי' הראל. ירושלים: מוסד ביאליק. 
כהן, הלל. 2013. תרפ"ט-שנת האפס בסכסוך היהודי-ערבי. ירושלים, כתר, עמ' 22-105. 
ליאון, נסים. 2003. "כנס התשובה ההמוני בחרדיות המזרחית." עמ' 82-98 בתוך חרדים ישראלים: השתלבות בלא טמיעה?, בעריכת ע' סיון וק' קפלן. תל אביב: מכון ון ליר והקבוץ המאוחד. 
לומסקי פדר, עדנה. 2003. "מסו?כן זיכרון לאומי לקהילת אבל מקומית: טקס יום הזיכרון בבתי ספר 
בישראל." מגמות, 3, 387-353. 
ליסק, משה. 1996. "סוציולוגים 'ביקורתיים' וסוציולוגים 'ממסדיים' בקהילה האקדמית הישראלית: מאבקים אידיאולוגיים או שיח אקדמי עניני?" עמ' 60-99 בתוך ציונות: פולמוס בן זמננו, גישות ואידיאולוגיות, בעריכת פ' גינוסר וא' בראלי. שדה-בוקר: אוניברסיטת בן-גוריון. 
מוריס, בני. 1991. לידתה של בעיית הפליטים הפלסטינים 1947-1949 . תל אביב: עם עובד, עמ' 11-14, 
17-49. 
נעמן, יונית. 2006. "'ידוע שהתימניות חמות במיטה': על הקשר בין צפיפות הפיגמנט לשם התואר פרחה." תיאוריה וביקורת 28: 185-191. 
סמוחה, סמי, 2000. "דמוקרטיה אתנית: ישראל כאב-טיפוס." עמ' 29-50 בתוך השסע היהודי-ערבי בישראל: מקראה, בעריכת ר' גביזון וד' הקר. ירושלים, המכון הישראלי לדמוקרטיה. 
סעדה אופיר, גלית. 2009. "מודרניות מן הצד האחר של ישראל: קולות מן העיר שדרות." עמ' 253-275 בתוך עיירות הפיתוח, בעריכת צ' צמרת, א' חלמיש וא' מאיר-גליצנדטיין. ירושלים: הוצאת יד יצחק בן צבי. 
סרוסי, אדווין ומוטי רגב. 2013. מוזיקה פופולרית ותרבות בישראל. האוניברסיטה הפתוחה, רעננה, עמ' 313-347. 
עוז, עמוס. 1998. כל התקוות-מחשבות על זהות ישראלית. תל אביב, כתר: 9-17. 
פישר, שלמה. 1999. "תנועת ש"ס." תיאוריה וביקורת 12-13: 329- 337 (לא כולל עמודים זוגיים). 
פלד, יואב וגרשון שפיר. 2005. מיהו ישראלי: הדינמיקה של אזרחות מורכבת. תל אביב: אוניברסיטת תל אביב, 171-190. 
קימרלינג, ברוך. 1993. "על מיליטריזם בישראל." תיאוריה וביקורת. 4: 123-140. 
קפלן, דני. 2011. "ניתוח ניאו-מוסדי של עליית מוזיקה מזרחית "לייט" ברדיו הישראלי בשנים 1995-2010." סוציולוגיה ישראלית. י"ג (1):135-159. 
קשוע, סייד. 2002. ערבים רוקדים. תל אביב, הוצאת מודן: 28-30, 47-51, 67-69, 80-83, 84-85, 107 
-113, 148-150. 
רגב, מוטי. 2003. "מבוא לתרבות הישראלית" עמ' 823-898 בתוך מגמות בחברה הישראלי (כרך ב'), בעריכת א' יער, וז' שביט. תל אביב: האוניברסיטה הפתוחה. 
רוזנהק, זאב. 2007. "דינמיקות של הכלה והדרה במדינת הרווחה הישראלית: בנית מדינה וכלכלה 
מדינית." עמ' 317-349 בתוך דורות, מרחבים, זהויות: מבטים עכשוויים על חברה ותרבות בישראל, בעריכת 
ח' הרצוג, ט' כוכבי וש' צלניקר. ירושלים: מכון ון ליר והקיבוץ המאוחד. 
רם, אורי. 2005. "הזמן של ה'פוסט': הערות על הסוציולוגיה בישראל מאז שנות התשעים." תיאוריה 
וביקורת 26: 241-254 . 
שגיא, אבי וידידיה שטרן. 2011. מולדת יחפה- מחשבות ישראליות. תל אביב, ירושלים: עם עובד, המכון הישראלי לדמוקרטיה, 137-144. 
שהם, חזקי. 2014. נעשה לנו חג- חגים ותרבות אזרחית בישראל. ירושלים: המכון הישראלי לדמוקרטיה, 
עמ' 27-79. 
שלום, גרשם. "מכתב לחנה ארנדט." דבר, 31 בינואר 1964, עמ' 7. 
שנהב, יהודה. 2003. היהודים – ערבים: לאומיות דת ואתניות. תל אביב: עם עובד, 7-24. 
ששון-לוי, ארנה. 2003. "גבריות מתוך מחאה: על כינון הזהויות של חיילים בתפקידי צווארון כחול". סוציולוגיה ישראלית ה(1): 15-47. 

Additional Reading Material: 
TBA

Course/Module evaluation: 
End of year written/oral examination 0 %
Presentation 0 %
Participation in Tutorials 15 %
Project work 55 %
Assignments 0 %
Reports 30 %
Research project 0 %
Quizzes 0 %
Other 0 %

=========================================

האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים
סילבוס
בירוקרטיה ומדינה חלק א - 53725 
תאריך עדכון אחרון 13-09-2017
נקודות זכות באוניברסיטה העברית: 2
תואר: מוסמך
היחידה האקדמית שאחראית על הקורס: סוציולוגיה ואנתרופולוגיה
סמסטר: סמסטר ב'
שפת ההוראה: עברית
קמפוס: הר הצופים
מורה אחראי על הקורס (רכז): יעל ברדה
דוא"ל של המורה האחראי על הקורס: Yael.Berda@mail.huji.ac.il
שעות קבלה של רכז הקורס: בתיאום מראש
מורי הקורס: 
ד"ר יעל ברדה
תאור כללי של הקורס: 
הקורס הוא סדנא מרוכזת בת חמישה ימים מלאים בתאריכים 1 
12-16.2.2017 
מדוע הוגים מקבילים את היווצרותה של המדינה לארגון פשע מאורגן? כיצד הטפסים במשרד הפנים משפיעים על יחסים חברתיים בתוך המדינה? מה הקשר בין יצירה של קטיגוריות בלשכה המרכזית לסטטיסטיקה ליצירה של פערים חברתיים? ולמי יש יותר כח, לשר האוצר או לפקידים של אגף התקציבים? ומאין מגיע כוחו האדיר של המסמך במדינה המודרנית? 
הקורס מתמקד בביורוקרטיה של המדינה, ובפעולה הארגונית של הרשות המבצעת והשפעתה הפוליטית על חיי היומיום של האזרחים. הנחת המוצא של הקורס היא כי בידי הביורוקרטיה של המדינה כח פוליטי רב, והיא איננה מערכת נייטרלית שפועלת באופן זהה בכל מקום. בקורס נבחן באופן השוואתי את היומיום הביורוקרטי של המדינה, ונראה כיצד פעולתה של האדמיניסטרציה נוצרת על ידי פרקטיקות של פעולות יומיומיות בתנאים הסטורים, כלכליים, פוליטים ותרבותיים מסוימים. נבחן יחד את אופן התארגנותה של המדינה והיווצרותה של הביורוקרטיה המדינתית, ובוחן פעולות מנהליות וממשליות באופן השוואתי ברחבי העולם (ארצות הברית, הודו, ישראל, האימפריה הבריטית והעות'מנית ועוד ) תוך שימוש בדוגמאות בתחומים שלטוניים שונים. נתמקד בשילובן של תיאוריות ארגוניות ותיאוריות של המדינה תוך תיאורי מקרה ודיון בחומרים עכשויים, ובעיקר בביורוקרטיה כביטוי של ריבונות וכמוקד של הפרות זכויות אזרח. בשולי הקורס נעסוק גם באופן שביורוקרטיה נתפסת בדימיון הקולקטיבי, בתוצרי תרבות כמו סרטים וספרים. 
הקורס הוא תנאי להשתתפות בסמינר ביורוקרטיה ומדינה בסמסטר ב'.

מטרות הקורס: 
המטרה העיקרית של הקורס היא להכשיר את המשתתפות/ים לחשיבה ביקורתית ומקורית על ביורוקרטיה ואדמיניסטרציה של המדינה. המשתתפים ילמדו לזהות את מקומה המרכזי של האדמיניסטרטציה בניהול החיים במדינה המודרנית ואת הקשר בין ביורוקרטיה לאזרחות וזכויות אזרח. המשתתפים יוכלו לנתח את הקשר המורכב בין ביורוקרטיה לפוליטיקה ולבין צורות של ארגון לתוכן שלטוני. המשתתפים יקבלו כלים לאתר את שדה הכח הפוליטי במערכות ביורוקרטיות באמצעות כלים תיאורטים ומתודולוגים. 
בסיומו של הקורס, מלבד כלים תיאורטים ומתודולוגים, יהיה ברשות המשתתפים מחקר מקדים ראשוני שאיתו יוכלו להמשיך לסמינר ביורוקרטיה ומדינה

תוצרי למידה : 
בסיומו של קורס זה, סטודנטים יהיו מסוגלים: 
1. המשתתפןת/ים יוכלו לזהות פרקטיקות ארגוניות שמשפיעות על החלטות שלטונית ומדיניות. 
2. המשתתפות/ים יוכלו ליישם מודלים תיאורטים על ארגונים מדינתיים ובעזרתם לאתר מוקדים של כח פוליטי ותרבותי. 
3. המשתתפות/ים יוכלו לשאול שאלות מחקר פוריות שיאפשרו שימוש עתידי בנתונים חדשניים לניתוח הקשר בין פרקטיקות ארגוניות לכח פוליטי. 

דרישות נוכחות (%): 
100

שיטת ההוראה בקורס: הרצאות ודיונים

רשימת נושאים / תכנית הלימודים בקורס: 
יום א 12.2.17 
1. מבוא - חוק וניירת: הכח הפוליטי של המקלדת 
2. היווצרות המדינה - מודל הפשע המאורגן ואחרים 
יום ב 13.2.17 
3. מקס וובר - עקרונות הביורוקרטיה 
4. התפתחות המחשבה הבירוקרטית, המהפכה הניהולית והרציונליות כאידיאולוגיה 
5. יש דבר כזה הפרדת רשויות? 
יום ג 14.2.17 
6. ביורוקרטיה של יומיום וכוחה של הרשות 
המבצעת בהודו 
7. ביורוקרטיה באימפריות האמריקאית, העותמנית והבריטית 

הצגה של תצפית אתר ביורוקרטי 

יום ד 15.2.17 
6. כתיבה, תיקים ולוגו על הטכנולוגיה של הביורוקרטיה 
7. כלי הנשק של הביורוקרטיה: תקנות, מסמכים, ססטיסטיקה וניהול אוכלוסין 

8. הבנאליות של הרוע 

יום ה 16.2.17 
9. כח ביורוקרטי: שיקול דעת וזכרון אדמיניסטרטיבי 
10.ביורוקרטיה ובטחון 
11. ביורוקרטיה בדימיון הקולקטיבי- סרטים, ספרים ושמועות

חומר חובה לקריאה: 
כ 25% מחומרי הקריאה עשויים להשתנות וישלחו כחודש ימים לפני תחילת הקורס. 
מבוא – חוק וניירת – הכח הפוליטי של המקלדת 
1. Mathew Hull. 2012. Documents and bureaucracy Annual Review of Anthropology 2012 41 pp. 251-267 
הטירה פרנץ קפקא 
2. היווצרות המדינה - מודל הפשע המאורגן – 
Tilly, C., Evans, P. B., Rueschemeyer, D., & Skocpol, T. (1985). War making and state making as organized crime (pp. 169-191). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. 
Mitchell, Timothy. "The limits of the state: beyond statist approaches and their critics." American Political Science Review 85.01 (1991): 77-96. 
Migdal, Joel S. Strong societies and weak states: state-society relations and state capabilities in the Third World. Princeton University Press, 1988. 142-172 
Robust Action and the Rise of the Medici, 1400-1434 
John F. Padgett and Christopher K. Ansell 
American Journal of Sociology 
Vol. 98, No. 6 (May, 1993), pp. 1259-1319 


מקס וובר - עקרונות הביורוקרטיה וpolitics as vocation 
4 Weber, Max. [1958] From Max Weber: Essays on Sociology (New York: Oxford University Press). 

3.התפתחות המחשבה הבירוקרטית, המהפכה הניהולית והרציונליות כאידיאולוגיה 

יהודה שנהב. 1995. מכונת הארגון. תל-אביב: עם עובד. פרקים: א', ב', ז'. 


Barley Steven and Gideon Kunda. 1992. "Design and devotion: Surges of rational and normative ideologies of control in managerial discourse" Administrative Science Quarterly, 47: 363-399. 

יהודה שנהב. 1995. מכונת הארגון. תל-אביב: עם עובד. פרקים: ה', ו'. 

Shenhav, Yehouda.1999. Manufacturing Rationality - The Engineering 
Foundations of the Managerial Revolution,. Pp.1-15, 71-101. 

3. יש דבר כזה הפרדת רשויות? 

Carpenter, Daniel. The Forging of Bureaucratic Autonomy: Networks, Repuations and Policy Innovation in Executive Agencies, 1862-1928 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001) 
אמנון רובינשטיין, הפרדת רשויות 
שרון אסיסקוביץ, גישת הפוליטיקה הביורוקרטית ומדינת הרווחה הישראלית 

4. ביורוקרטיה של יומיום - הודו 
Gupta, A. (2012). Red tape: Bureaucracy, structural violence, and poverty in India. Duke University Press Akheel 
Gould, William. Bureaucracy, community and influence in India: Society and the state, 1930s-1960s. Routledge, 2010. 
5. ביורוקרטיה באימפריות: ארהב עותמנית 
Barkey, Karen. Bandits and Bureaucrats: The Ottoman Route to State Centralization (New York: Columbia University Press, 1997). Paperback. 
Sean Gailmard and John Patty 2007 Slackers and zealots: civil service, policy Discretion and Bureuacratic expertise American journal of political science 51 (4) 873 
William G. Ouchi, “Markets, Bureaucracies and Clans,” Administrative Science Quarterly 25 (1980): 129-41 [J-STOR or e-journals] 
6. כתיבה, תיקים ולוגו על הטכנולוגיה של הביורוקרטיה 
Mathew Hull. 2012. Documents and bureaucracy Annual Review of Anthropology 2012 41 pp. 251-267 
Raman, Bhavani. Document Raj: Writing and Scribes in Early Colonial South India. University of Chicago Press, 2012. 
Hull, Matthew S. Government of paper: The materiality of bureaucracy in urban Pakistan. Univ of California Press, 2012. 
Vismann, Cornelia, and Geoffrey Winthrop-Young. Files: Law and media technology. Stanford Univ Pr, 2008. 

7. כלי הנשק של הביורוקרטיה: תקנות, מסמכים, סטטיסטיקה ומרשם אוכלוסין 
Veena Das, The signature of the state: the paradox of illegibility in life and words: violence and the descent into the ordinary, oxford university press 2007 pp 162-184 
Becker Peter and William Clarck, Eds. Little tools of knowledge: historical essays on academic and Bureuacratic practice 
Duguid, Paul and john Seely brown "the social life of documents 
Arjun appadurai, fear of small numbers and the social life of things 
Kim, Jaeeun. "Establishing Identity: Documents, Performance, and Biometric Information in Immigration Proceedings." Law & Social Inquiry 36.3 (2011): 760-786. 
8. הבנאליות של הרוע: ארנדט, חנה. 2000. אייכמן בירושלים: דו"ח על הבנאליות של הרוע. תל-אביב: בבל. 
עמ': 29-11 , 309-291. 

ראול הילברג. 2002. "הגדרה מתוקף צו" תיאוריה וביקורת, 21: 35-46 
כריסטופר בראונינג. 2004. אנשים רגילים. תל-אביב: ידיעות אחרונות ספרי חמד 

9. תרבות פוליטית ותרבות ארגונית – crozier 
Michel Crozier The Bureuacratic Phenomenon 
The new institutionalism: organizational factors in political life "American political Science Review 78 pp. 734-749 
Carruthers, Bruce "When is the state autonomous? Culture, organization theory and the political sociology of the state 
Michael Herzfeld the social production of indifference 
Men and women of the corporation 
Cultural and Reputational Theory:
DiMaggio and Powell, “Introduction,” and Chapters 1-5 in The New 
Institutionalism in Organizational Analysis. 
March, James G., Michael D. Cohen, and Johan P. Olsen. 1972. “A Garbage Can Model of Organizational Decision Making.” Administrative Science Quarterly 17(1): 1-25. [J-STOR] 
John Padgett, “Managing Garbage Can Hierarchies,” Administrative Science Quarterly (1980) [J-STOR] 

10. כח ביורוקרטי Bordieu Pierre 1994- Rethinking the state; genesis and structure of the bureaucratic field 
Steinmetz "the colonial state as a social field 
11. זכרון ארגוני ושיקול דעת ומורשת ביורוקרטית 
12. הביורוקרטיה של הכיבוש 
Hannah Arendt, 1951, "Race and Bureacracy" in The Origins of Totalitarianism, New York: Harcourt, Brace and World, pp 185 – 222. 

צו בדבר הוראות בטחון התש"ל 1970 – חלק מקדמי 

יעל ברדה, הביורוקרטיה של הכיבוש: משטר ההיתרים בגדה המערבית 2000-2006 הוצאת ון ליר והקיבוץ המאוחד, ירושלים. 

13. ביורוקרטיה בדימיון הקולקטיבי 
חיים של אחרים, הספציאליסט, מסתננים, Insiders

חומר לקריאה נוספת: 
Wilson, James Q. 1989. Bureaucracy: What Government Agencies Do and How They Do It (New York: Basic Books). 
March, James G., and Simon, Herbert A. Organizations, Second Edition (New York: Blackwell, 1993). 
Simon, Herbert A. 1951. Administrative Behavior, Second Edition (Macmillan). 
DiMaggio, Paul, and Walter W. Powell, The New Institutionalism in Organizational Analysis, (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1991). 

Miller, Gary J. Managerial Dilemmas: The Political Economy of Hierarchy (New York, Cambridge University Press, 1992). 
David Epstein and Sharyn O’Halloran, Delegating Powers: A Transaction-Cost Approach to Policymaking under Separate Powers (Cambridge, 1999). 
Crozier, Michel. The Bureaucratic Phenomenon (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1964). 
Kaufman, Herbert. The Forest Ranger (Washington, D.C.: Resources for the Future). Kerwin, Cornelius. Rulemaking: How Government Agencies Write Law and Make Policy 
(Washington, D.C., CQ Press, 1999). 
Rosen, Stephen. 1993. Winning the Next War: Innovation and the Modern Military (Cornell U.P.). 
William G. Ouchi, “Markets, Bureaucracies and Clans,” Administrative Science Quarterly 25 (1980): 129-41 [J-STOR or e-journals] 
Cultural and Reputational Theory:
DiMaggio and Powell, “Introduction,” and Chapters 1-5 in The New 
Institutionalism in Organizational Analysis. 
March, James G., Michael D. Cohen, and Johan P. Olsen. 1972. “A Garbage Can Model of Organizational Decision Making.” Administrative Science Quarterly 17(1): 1-25. [J-STOR] 
John Padgett, “Managing Garbage Can Hierarchies,” Administrative Science Quarterly (1980) [J-STOR] 
Jonathan Bendor, Terry Moe and Kenneth Shotts, “Recycling the Garbage Can,” APSR (2002). [J-STOR] 

הערכת הקורס - הרכב הציון הסופי : 
מבחן מסכם בכתב/בחינה בעל פה 0 %
הרצאה0 %
השתתפות 5 %
הגשת עבודה 60 %
הגשת תרגילים 10 %
הגשת דו"חות 25 %
פרויקט מחקר 0 %
בחנים 0 %
אחר 0 %

מידע נוסף / הערות: 
השתתפות בקורס זה הוא תנאי להשתתפות בסמינר ביורוקרטיה ומדינה בסמסטר ב. המשתתפים ישתמשו בחומרים שעיבדו בקורס זה. 
משימות הקורס: 
1. הקורס הוא סדנא מרוכזת בת חמישה ימים. יש להגיע כשקרתם את כל החומרים מראש. 
2. כתיבת דוח התבוננות על אתר של התרחשות ביורוקרטית (לבחירתכן/ם תוך התייעצות עם המרצה) 
זו משימה שדורשת התבוננות של כמה שעות במקומות מחוץ לאוניברסיטה שדורשת יוזמה ותיאום עצמאיים.הדו''ח יוצג בכיתה בפרזנטציה של 5 ד' ולאחריו יתקיים דיון קצר. 
3. עבודה מסכמת

The Hebrew University
Syllabus Bureaucracy and State Part 1 - 53725 
Last update 13-09-2017
HU Credits: 2
Degree/Cycle: 2nd degree (Master)
Responsible Department: Sociology & Anthropology
Semester: 2nd Semester
Teaching Languages: Hebrew
Campus: Mt. Scopus
Course/Module Coordinator: Yael Berda
Coordinator Email: Yael.Berda@mail.huji.ac.il
Coordinator Office Hours:
Teaching Staff: 
Dr. Yael Berda
Course/Module description: 
The course focuses on state bureaucracies, the institutional practices of the executive Branch and its political influence on the daily life of citizens. our premise is that organizations within state bureaucracy have great political power, that are not politically neutral. We will explore the bureaucracy of the state through a comparative lens and locate daily practices and routines that are created within particular historical, economic and cultural conditions and constraints (In Israel, US, India, The British and Ottoman Empires and more). We will learn to apply institutional and political theory to contemporary cases, particularly the relationship between bureaucracy, sovereignty and violations of citizens rights.

Course/Module aims: 
The main goal of the course is to train future researchers and policy makers to critical and creative thinking about bureaucracy and the administration of the state.

Learning outcomes - On successful completion of this module, students should be able to: 
1. participants will learn to recognize institutional practices that affect policy and decision making. 
2. participants will be able to apply theoretical models on state organizations and discover sites of political and cultural power within the administration. 
3. participants will be able to pose fruitful research questions that will enable further research using new data to understand the relationship between institutional practices and political power.

Attendance requirements(%): 

Teaching arrangement and method of instruction: lectures and discussion

Course/Module Content: 
*
Required Reading: 
*
Additional Reading Material: 
*
Course/Module evaluation: 
End of year written/oral examination 0 %
Presentation 0 %
Participation in Tutorials 5 %
Project work 60 %
Assignments 10 %
Reports 25 %
Research project 0 %
Quizzes 0 %
Other 0 %

========================================================================



האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים
סילבוס
סוציולוגיה של המשפט - 53116 
תאריך עדכון אחרון 13-09-2017
נקודות זכות באוניברסיטה העברית: 2
תואר: בוגר
היחידה האקדמית שאחראית על הקורס: סוציולוגיה ואנתרופולוגיה
סמסטר: סמסטר ב'
שפת ההוראה: עברית
קמפוס: הר הצופים
מורה אחראי על הקורס (רכז): יעל ברדה
דוא"ל של המורה האחראי על הקורס: Yael.Berda@mail.huji.ac.il
שעות קבלה של רכז הקורס: יום ג' 10:30 - 12:00
מורי הקורס: 
ד"ר יעל ברדה
תאור כללי של הקורס: 
למשפט יש חיי חברה. יתכן שיש למשפט חיים חברתיים רבים ומגוונים. יש אפילו אלה שרואים את המשפט כתרבות. אבל קודם כל, המשפט הוא תוצר של כוחות חברתיים, תרבותיים וכלכליים. המשפט נוצר דרך מה שאנשים מחליטים להלחם עליו ולהסתכסך לגביו, מהו המובן מאליו ומה מותר ואסור לאמר בחברה. אבל המשפט הוא מוסד שמאפשר את קיומם של הרבה מוסדות חברתיים אחרים. 
הגישה הסוציולוגית למשפט מציעה להתבונן על מבנים משפטיים, על האופן שבו המשפט הופך לתרבות ולאידיאולוגיה, על כוחם הפוליטי והחברתי של מוסדות. בקורס נלמד, דרך סוגיות אקטואליות ולפעמים בוערות ושנויות במחלוקת, על האופן שבו משפט, מוסדות חברתיים ופרקטיקות כלכליות ופוליטיות מבנים זה את זה. הקורס הוא ביקורתי במסורת של תנועת "משפט וחברה" ומבקש לאתגר תפיסות שרואות במשפט מערכת עצמאית המנותקת באופן זה או אחר מהכלכלה הפוליטית של המדינה והחיים החברתיים בה. בנוסף, תנועת משפט וחברה ראתה במשפט כלי משמעותי לשנוי חברתי ופוליטי רחב היקף, ולאורך הקורס נדון גם במנעד האפשרויות לשינוי חברתי שמציעים לנו חומרי הקריאה והדיונים בכיתה. 
מטרות הקורס: 
למשפט יש חיי חברה. יתכן שיש למשפט חיים חברתיים רבים ומגוונים. יש אפילו אלה שרואים את המשפט כתרבות. אבל קודם כל, המשפט הוא תוצר של כוחות חברתיים, תרבותיים וכלכליים. המשפט נוצר דרך מה שאנשים מחליטים להלחם עליו ולהסתכסך לגביו, מהו המובן מאליו ומה מותר ואסור לאמר בחברה. אבל המשפט הוא מוסד שמאפשר את קיומם של הרבה מוסדות חברתיים אחרים. 
תוצרי למידה : 
בסיומו של קורס זה, סטודנטים יהיו מסוגלים: 
בסיומו של הקורס סטודנטיות/ים יוכלו: 
1. לזהות גורמים חברתיים שמשפיעים על היווצרות של מוסדות משפטיים. 
2. יוכלו לבקר הסדרים משפטיים ולהבחין בין טקסטים משפטיים שיש לגביהם הסכמה דמוקרטית פורמלית (כמו חוקים של הכנסת) לבין טקסטים ומוסדות משפטיים שהם תוצר של מאבקי כוח סמויים מן העין. 
3. הסטודנטים יוכלו לנתח באופן בסיסי את הקשר בין זכויות משפטיות והיכולת להשתמש במוסדות משפטיים עבור קבוצות שונות באוכלוסיה על בסיס הבדלי מעמד, גזע, מגדר, לאום, דת ונטיה מינית. 
4. הסטודנטים יוכלו לחלץ טיעון משפטי, לזהות את התיאוריה והמתודה בו הכותבת משתמשת, להביא דוגמא חיצונית לאותו הטיעון, ולהביע עליו דעה.
דרישות נוכחות (%): 
60
שיטת ההוראה בקורס: הרצאה פרונטלית ודיונים בקבוצות, ניירות תגובה, עבודה מסכמת.
רשימת נושאים / תכנית הלימודים בקורס: 
נושאי השיעורים: 
1. מבוא 
2. משפט ו(אי) שיויון 
3 שיעורים 
3. משפט ומרחב 
3 שיעורים 
3. משפט, מגדר ותרבות 
3 שיעורים 
4. משפט וריבונות (בטחון המדינה , הפרטה, הלאמה, כליאה) 
3 שיעורים

חומר חובה לקריאה: 
התאריכים ישתנו ויפורסמו בסוף סמסטר א לקראת תחילת הקורס 

1. מבוא לסוציולוגיה של המשפט - מאבות הסוציולוגיה למשפט, חברה ותרבות. 
נא לקרוא את הזמנה לסוציולוגיה של המשפט של דפנה הקר לשיעור הראשון 

2. משפט ו(אי) שיויון או למה סכסוכים משפטיים הם לא עניין "אוביקטיבי" 
היווצרותם של סכסוכים והשנותם - מתן שם, הטלת אשם, עמידה על זכות - פלסטינר סאראט ושיינגולד מעשי משפט כרך ג' 2010 

3. משפט, מעמד וחלוקת משאבים 
מדוע אלה שיש להם נוטים להצליח: הרהורים על גבולות השינוי המשפטי 
מעשי משפט כרך ד' 

4. ההבניה המשפטית של דיכוי חברתי א(וגם של פריבילגיות) 
יפעת ביטון, על טיבה וטובה של הפליה: המזרחים בישראל בין הגלוי לנסתר, מעשי משפט כרך ד 2011 
Loïc Wacquant, “Deadly Symbiosis: When Ghetto and Prison Meet and Mesh.” 3 
Punishment and Society 95‐134 (2001). 

5. משפט ומרחב 1 - בית המשפט 
שירת הסירנות: שיח וחלל בבית המשפט - אביגדור פלדמן 


6. משפט ומרחב 2 בארץ עם עו''ד נטע עמר (קריאה בהמשך) 
הסרט שלטון החוק של רענן אלכסנדרוביץ 

7. משפט ומרחב 3 בעולם 

רונן שמיר 
ישראל במשפחת העמים : כמה הערות על התנתקות כמשטר תנועה גלובלי 
בתוך משפט וממשל ח, 2 (תשסה) 601-642 

8. משפט, מגדר פוליטיקה - טעימה מהתחום: 
1. מנאר חסן הפוליטיקה של הכבוד בתוך הספר מין מגדר פוליטיקה עמ 267 

2. סיפור של אונס לא יותר - 
9. תודעה משפטית והתנגדות משפטית: 

Patricia Ewick and Susan Silbey, “Conformity, Contestation and Resistance:  An Account of 
Legal Consciousness.”  26 New England Law Review 731‐750 (1991‐1992).    

קלריס חרבון: השתכנות מתקנת - סיפורן של נשים המתקנות עוול הסטורי. בתוך דפנה 
ברק-ארז ואח? (עורכות), עיונים במשפט, מגדר ופמיניזם (הוצאת נבו, 2007), עמ? 41 

10. משפט ותרבות - או ההבניה המשפטית של דיכוי חברתי חלק ב'. 
איך זה שכוכב אחד מעז... למען השם? - עלילות משפטיות: השוואה נרטיבית בין ת"פ (י-ם) 305/93 מ"י נ' דרעי לבין ת"פ (ת"א) 329/96 מ"י נ' אולמר, ארנה בן נפתלי, אסף ברם, הילה תירוש 

קלריס חרבון: דיור ציבורי בתוך לקסיקון המחאה החברתית 

משפט ובטחון המדינה 
סמירה אסמיר בשם הבטחון הקדמה לגיליון מחברות עדאלה 4 אביב 2004 

הגדרת האסירים הפלסטינים בישראל - עביר בכר מחברות עדאלה 
גיליון 5 2009 בעמ' 57 

מעצר מנהלי: אתמול פלסטינים, היום מתנחלים, מחר אתם 
03 אוג', 2015 
נעם רותם 

12. המאבק על משאבי הכלל- הפרטה, הלאמה ומה שבינהם 

דפנה ברק-ארז 
"זכויות אדם בעידן של הפרטה" 
עבודה, חברה ומשפט, כרך ח, עמודים 209 – 224, 2001. 

יעל ברדה וגלעד ברנע הפרטת בתי הסוהר 
מעשי משפט כרך ב 

מתוה הגז סיטבון ומיכאלי - מעשה משפט כרך ז 


13. כליאה וגזע - בתי סוהר 
בועז סנג'רו כליאה - חשיבה מחודשת הסניגור 220 עמ' 4 Penal Excess and Surplus Meaning: Public Torture Lynchings in Twentieth-Century America 
David Garland 
Law & Society Review 
Vol. 39, No. 4 (Dec., 2005), pp. 793-833 

חומר לקריאה נוספת: 

הערכת הקורס - הרכב הציון הסופי : 
מבחן מסכם בכתב/בחינה בעל פה 0 %
הרצאה0 %
השתתפות 10 %
הגשת עבודה 66 %
הגשת תרגילים 0 %
הגשת דו"חות 24 %
פרויקט מחקר 0 %
בחנים 0 %
אחר 0 %

מידע נוסף / הערות: 
בסיום הקורס יגישו הסטודנטיות/ים עבודה בהיקף של עד 6 עמודים שמשקלה יהיה 66% מהציון. 
במשך הקורס, הסטודנטים יבחרו 4 מתוך 11 שיעורים שבהם יגישו נייר תגובה בין 250 ל 500 מילה, על חומר הקריאה של השיעור. כל נייר עמדה עובר יזכה את הכותבת ב6 נקודות. ניירות עמדה מצטיינים יקבלו נקודה נוספת, כך שניתו יהיה לצבור 5 נקודות נוספות לציון סופי של 105. 
ההשתפות בקורס היא משמעותית ומהווה 10% מהציון הסופי. סטודנטים שמתקשים להשתתף ולדבר מול קהל גדול, מסיבות שונות (שפה, פחד קהל ועוד) מתבקשים לבוא ולדבר עם המרצה בשעות הקבלה ונמצא יחד חלופה הולמת למרכיב הציון של ההשתתפות. נדרשת נוכחות ב 60% מהשיעורים. 
דף ההנחיות לכתיבת הדוחות הוא חלק בלתי נפרד מדרישות הקורס. הנחיות לעבודה המסכמת ינתנו בשליש האחרון של הסמסטר.




================================================================


האוניברסיטה העברית בירושלים
שותפות אקדמיה- קהילה לשינוי חברתי
פרופ' יהודה שנהב ועו"ד יעל ברדה
החוג לסוציולוגיה ואנתרופולוגיה, אוניברסיטת תל-אביב
שם הקורס: בירוקרטיה, ממשליות וזכויות אדם
  
סילבוס הקורס "בירוקרטיה, ממשליות וזכויות אדם"
 
מרצה: פרופ' יהודה שנהב
מנחה ומתרגלת: עו"ד יעל ברדה
     מרצה אורח: עו"ד מיכאל ספרד
 
הקורס יעסוק בפרקטיקה ובתיאוריה הניהולית, תוך התמקדות בטכניקות שליטה אשר צמחו בתוך ההקשר של הכיבוש הישראלי בשטחים. נבחן את המקורות ההיסטורים של טכניקות אלה וננסה למקמן בתוך ההקשר הקולוניאלי במיוחד זה הבריטי והצרפתי. נדגים כיצד משתקף הכיבוש, על חללי הריבונות שהוא מייצר, בפרקטיקות הניהוליות של רשויות הביצוע, המשטור ואכיפת החוק. בין השאר נדגים כיצד משופע הכיבוש ממרחבים נטולי חוק שבהם חייהם של אנשים הופכים להיות "חיים החשופים" לאלימות או לאיום באלימות. תוך כדי כך ננתח את המשמעויות הפוליטיות והתרבותיות הכרוכות באנכרוניזם היסטורי ונחברן לשאלות של מוסר וגזע, של פוליטיקה וריבונות, ושל תיאולוגיה פוליטית. במיוחד נתמקד בקשר בין גזע לביורוקרטיה, והקשר בינם לבין אלימות על צורותיה השונות. במהלך הקורס נתודע למורכבות של מימוש זכויות האדם דווקא במפגשים החריגים אך היומיומיים בהן קיומן הוא החיוני ביותר, נלמד להקשיב לעדות ולסיפור מנקודות המבט של השחקנים השונים באירוע, ובעיקר "להתבונן מעבר לכתף של הפועל בשירות המדינה" כדי לנסות ולהבין את המנגנונים ורשתות האירועים הפועלים במציאות.
 
מבנה הקורס:
הקורס מוגדר כסמינר המשלב בין תיאוריה ופרקטיקה. בנוסף להרצאות של פרופ' שנהב, עו"ד מיכאל ספרד ילווה את הקורס כמרצה אורח וכיועץ המשפטי של עמותת "יש דין". הסטודנטיות יפעלו, מידי שבועיים, במסגרת הפעילות של פרוייקט המשקיפים על בתי המשפט הצבאיים של "יש דין" ובפרוייקט הסיוע במנהלות התיאום והקישור של ארגון "מחסום watch". הסטודנטיות תפעלנה, בהנחיית הארגונים, בפעולות של תיעוד, סנגור וקישור מול הגורמים המנהליים תוך ניהול "יומן מסע" של הפעילות. פעילותן תלווה ע"י עו"ד יעל ברדה, הן ברמה הפרטנית והן ברמה הקבוצתית, לפי קבוצות הפעילות.
הסטודנטיות יקבלו דמי נסיעה למקומות הפעילות וכן מלגה שנתית על סך 1450 ש"ח.
בסוף השנה, כל סטודנטית תגיש מאמר המבוסס על פעילותה וחוויותיה המתייחסים לתוכן התיאורטי של הקורס. חלק מהמאמרים יכללו בספר/חוברת בעריכתו של פרופ' שנהב, מיכאל ספרד ויעל ברדה ובשותפות עם הארגונים.        
 
 
סדר ההרצאות וחומר הקריאה
  
 24.10.06  הרצאה 1 : הצגת הקורס - הדרכות לקבוצות
 
פרופ' שנהב, עו"ד ספרד, עו"ד ברדה
 
 31.10.06 עבודת שטח
 
7.11.06    הרצאה 2: התפתחות המחשבה הבירוקרטית, המהפכה הניהולית והרציונליות כאידיאולוגיה
 
יהודה שנהב. 1995. מכונת הארגון. תל-אביב: עם עובד. פרקים: א', ב', ז'.
 
 
Barley Steven and Gideon Kunda. 1992. "Design and devotion: Surges of rational and normative ideologies of control in managerial discourse" Administrative Science Quarterly, 47: 363-399.
 
יהודה שנהב. 1995. מכונת הארגון. תל-אביב: עם עובד. פרקים: ה', ו'.
 
   Shenhav, Yehouda.1999. Manufacturing Rationality - The Engineering
   Foundations of the Managerial Revolution,. Pp.1-15, 71-101.
 
14.11.06 עבודת שטח
 
21.11.06 משפוט הכיבוש ומסגרת המשפט הבינלאומי - הרצאת אורח - מיכאל ספרד
 
מנשר בדבר סדרי השלטון והמשפט (אזור הגדה המערבית) (מס' 2), תשכ"ז – 1967
 
בג"צ 393/82 ג'מעית אסכאן אלמעלמון נ' מפקד כוחות צה"ל בגדה המערבית, פ"ד לז (4) 785
 
Orna Ben Naftali, Eyal Gross &Keren Michaeli, "Illegal Occupation: Framing the Occupied Palestinian Territory" Berkeley Journal of International Law p. 551
 
 Sfard, Michael,The Human Rights Lawyer’s Existential Dilemma, Israel Law review Vol. 38 No. 3, 2005 154-169
 
 28.11.06 עבודת שטח
  
5.12.06    הרצאה 3: : ביורוקרטיה וקטסטרופות פוליטית
 
 סרט: "הספציאליסט".
 
ארנדט, חנה. 2000. אייכמן בירושלים: דו"ח על הבנאליות של הרוע. תל-אביב: בבל.
עמ': 29-11 , 309-291.
 
ראול הילברג. 2002. "הגדרה מתוקף צו" תיאוריה וביקורת, 21: 35-46.
 
 עדית זרטל. 1999. "חנה ארנדט נגד מדינת ישראל"   50ל48: 159-168.
 
כריסטופר בראונינג. 2004. אנשים רגילים. תל-אביב: ידיעות אחרונות ספרי חמד.
 
באומן, זיגמונט. 1996. "מודרניות ושואה: על הרציונליות האינסטרומנטלית של
מנגנון ההשמדה", תיאוריה וביקורת 9, עמ' 125 146-. קיים גם תדפיס בספרייה.
 
12.12.06 עבודת שטח
 
19.12.06   הרצאה 4: ריבונות, ממשליות וכוח
 
Michel Foucault. 1997. Society Must be Defended. New York: Picador. Chapters Three and Four, Pp. 60-85.
 
* קרל שמיט. 2005. תיאולוגיה פוליטית. תל-אביב: הוצאת רסלינג.
 
* אנדראו ניל. 2005. "להתיז את ראשו של המלך: ספרו של פוקו חייבים להגן על החברה ובעיית הריבונות" תיאוריה וביקורת, 27 ע"מ 103-126 .
 
26.12.06 עבודת שטח
 
 2.1.07     עדות ווידוי - הרצאת אורחת מיכל גבעוני
  
9.1.07      עבודת שטח
 
16.1.07  עבודת שטח
 
27.2.07   הרצאה 5:.תיאולוגיה פוליטית ומצב החירום
 
ולטר בנימין. 1996. "על מושג ההיסטוריה" הרהורים, כרך ב' עמוד 313.
 
Agamben Giorgio. 2005. State of Exception. Chicago and London: University of ChicagoPress. Pp. 1-30.
יהודה שנהב. 2005. "דמוקרטיה במצב חירום" הארץ, מוסף ספרים, 23.11.05
  
6.3.07      הרצאה 6: אימפריאליזם, קולוניאליזם - הכובש והנכבש: מתלות הדדית ל'חיים חשופים'
 
Cromer, The Earl of. 1908a. "The government of subject races" Edinburgh Papers,January: 1-27.
 
 סעיד, אדוארד. 2000. אוריינטליזם. ספריית אופקים, הוצאת עם עובד. מבוא: עמ' 11-32.
 
אלבר ממי "דיוקנו של הכובש" בתוך קולוניאליות והמצב הפוסט קולוניאלי, עורך: יהודה שנהב, הוצאת מכון ון ליר/ הקיבוץ המאוחד עמ' 47 – 82
 
בג"צ 114/78 בורקאן נ' שר האוצר, פ"ד לב (2) 800.
 
אביגדור פלדמן, "המדינה הדמוקרטית מול המדינה היהודית: חלל ללא מקומות, זמן ללא המשכיות", עיוני משפט כרך יט (3) עמ' 717
 
ענת רימון אור "ממות הערבי עד מוות לערבים: היהודי המודרני מול הערבי החי בתוכו" בתוך קולוניאליות והמצב הפוסט קולוניאלי, עמ' 285 – 318
 
 
פרנץ פאנון. 2006. המקוללים עלי אדמות. תל-אביב: בבל
 
ג'ורג'יו אגמבן. 2003 "הומו סאקר: הכוח הריבוני והחיים החשופים" בתוך טכנולוגיות של צדק. שי לביא (עורך). עמ' 395-434
 
עדי אופיר. 2003 "בין קידוש החיים להפקרתם: במקום מבוא להומו סאקר" בתוך טכנולוגיות של צדק. עמ' 353-394
 
 
 13.3.07  עבודת שטח
 
20.3.07    עבודת שטח
 
27.3.07   מגזוע ואפרטהייד - מיכאל ספרד
 
א. רובינשטיין, המשפט הקונסטיטוציוני של מדינת ישראל (מהדורה חמישית) [הפרק העוסק ב"משפט המובלעות"]
 
הכרזה בדבר סגירת שטחים מס' 2/03/ס' (מרחב התפר)
היתר כללי לכניסה למרחב התפר ולשהייה בו
הוראות בדבר מעברים במרחב התפר
הוראות בדבר היתרי כניסה למרחב התפר ושהייה בו
(יחולקו בכיתה)
 
10.4.07 עבודת שטח
 
17.4.07    הרצאה 7: פרדיגמת הבטחון
 
סמירה אסמייר 2004 "בשם הבטחון" הקדמת למחברות עדאלה מס' 4, 2004, הוצאת אנדלוס. עמ' 1 -7
 
כהן הלל "חוק השב"כ, חוק הארכיונים והשיח הציבורי בישראל", מחברות עדאלה מס' 4, 2004, הוצאת אנדלוס עמ' 37 – 47
 
עביר בכר, "חקיקה אידיאולוגית בשם הבטחון" גיליון עדאלה האלקטרוני מס' 19, 2005
 
גולן, דפנה "איפה אני בסיפור הזה" הוצאת כתר, פרקים נבחרים.

        24.4.07    עבודת שטח
 
8.5.07      הרצאה 9: הביורוקרטיה של הכיבוש
 
Hannah Arendt, 1951, "Race and Bureacracy" in The Origins of Totalitarianism, New York:Harcourt, Brace and World, pp 185 – 222.
 
חוק הכניסה לישראל – התש"יב 1952
 
צו בדבר הוראות בטחון התש"ל 1970 – חלק מקדמי
 
הדס זיו, מחסום ווטש ורופאים לזכויות אדם, דו"ח משותף 2004 "ביורוקרטיה בשירות הכיבוש – מפקדות התיאום והקישור"
 
הדס זיו, רופאים לזכויות אדם 2003, "ברצותו אוחז וברצותו שולח: מדיניות ישראל להיתרי תנועה בכתר, נובמבר 2003.
 
מאיה רוזנפלד, "ימי ראשון בבוקר במחסום - 'תענוגות החובה' של השולטים, 'חובת הצומוד' של הנשלטים" בתוך פוליטיקה - כתב-עת למדע המדינה וליחסים בינלאומיים, גיליון 12/11, חורף 2004.
 
בג"ץ  6336/04 מוסא ואח' נ' ראש הממשלה ואח' – (העתירה כנגד הגדר בדיר בלוט וראפאת(
 
לסקי , גבי "בלעין – מקרה מבחן לחסינות : תרבות האלימות והשקר של כוחות הבטחון" גיליון עדאלה האלקטרוני, מס' 19, 2005.
 
גולן, דפנה "איפה אני בסיפור הזה" הוצאת כתר, פרקים נבחרים.
 
15.5.07           עבודת שטח
 
 29.5.07 הרצאה 10: : גלובליזציה של הטרור, ניהול האסון וארגונים הומניטריים
David Harvey. 2004. A Brief History of Neoliberalism. Oxford: oxford University Press.Pp. 1-38.
 
* אופיר, עדי. 2003. "טכנולוגיות מוסריות: ניהול האסון והפקרת החיים" תיאוריה וביקורת, 22: 67-103.
 
5.6.06    מפגש מסכם


Back to "Hebrew University"Send Response
Top Page
    Developed by Sitebank & Powered by Blueweb Internet Services
    Visitors: 243634545Send to FriendAdd To FavoritesMake It HomepagePrint version
    blueweb