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Boycott Calls Against Israel
Pro-Palestinian Activists Take-Over Professional Associations in order to Promote BDS: BRISMES As a Case in Point


03.07.19
Editorial Note 

In recent years IAM wrote of the many attempts by professional associations to endorse the boycott of Israel. Last year IAM reported that the leadership of the American Studies Association (ASA), was "taken-over" by a group of BDS activists, supported by the US Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (USACBI). 

Another attempt was thwarted last week when the British Society for Middle Eastern Studies (BRISMES) has voted in favor of BDS during the annual general meeting (AGM) in Leeds. The resolution was proposed by BRISMES Council Member Prof. John Chalcraft from London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) and seconded by Dr. Rafeef Ziadah of the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS). According to the BDS resolution, BRISMES endorses "the call for a boycott of Israeli academic institutions until these institutions publicly end their support and complicity in violating Palestinian rights as stipulated in international law". 
 
Charlcraft is a veteran anti-Israel activist. In 2007 he wrote an opinion piece in the Guardian"Should we vote for a boycott" advocating for a boycott. Since then he has signed many petitions endorsing BDS. In 2009 he was a signatory in a letter to the editor of the Guardian, urging the UK Government to revoke its support for any new agreements with Israel, as well as urging the European Parliament to refuse to any upgrades of EU benefits to Israel.  In his article "Israel's Bankrupt Politics," first posted in 2009 and updated in 2012, Chalcraft describes Israel as a "settler society adopting the colonial languages of cultural superiority, and based on the expulsion and dispossession of the indigenous Palestinian-Arab population, whose nationalist resistance is often called terrorism." He ends his piece with a direct call for BDS. 
 
His 2015 MESA paper "The BDS Movement and the Question of Radical Democracy" focuses on BDS and explores "the radically democratic characteristics of the movement" which deserves recognition. Charcraft also "draws out homologies between the BDS movement and other democratic movements of recent origin in the region." 
 
Suzanne Morrison, Charcraft's Ph.D. student in LSE, have submitted a thesis on "The Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions Movement: Activism Across Borders for Palestinian Justice", in 2015.
 
In the 2017 Middle East Studies Association (MESA) annual conference, Charlcraft organized a panel, Protest in the Contemporary Middle East and North Africa: strategic interaction perspectives,  where he presented the paper "Transnational activism and Veolia: A dynamic interaction analysis," discussing the French environmental and transport services, Veolia, which withdrew in 2015 from participating in the Jerusalem Light Rail. His paper begins with the first challenges to Veolia’s involvement in 2005-6 and aims "to shed light on the causal mechanisms at work: how did actions by the BDS movement translate into pressures on Veolia? What activist strategies were viable and effective? How were actors reconstituted over time? The case-study aims to shed light on the possibilities and limits of the BDS movement, to offer tools for studying transnational activism, and to address debates about strategic interaction perspectives on protest."  
 
The perception that Israel can do no right and the Palestinians can do no wrong also occurs in the recent BRISMES annual conference.  For example, on the 26 June, a panel titled Interdisciplinarity, Academic Freedom, Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions, and Palestine, was organized by Chalcraft. The first paper, "A praxis of solidarity: Palestine, Stop G4S and the Prison Industrial Complex" was presented by Rafeef Ziadah of SOAS; next paper was "BDS and the Boycott of Study Abroad Programs to Israel" by Bill Mullen, Purdue University; Followed by "The Academic Boycott Movement in the US: Academic (Un)Freedom and Decolonizing Palestine" by Sunaina Maira, of the University of California, Davis; and then "Transnational Solidarity with Palestine: lessons about the articulation of struggles from participatory action research" presented by Chalcraft. Not even a single paper opposing BDS was presented.  In fact, the program is replete with anti-Israel papers, not one presenting Israel in a positive light. All papers on Israel/Palestine were in favor of the Palestinians and no criticism was offered. 
 
Another BRISMES council member is Nicola Pratt who has posted on Facebook on the eve of the 24th of June, after the vote, that "The British Society for Middle Eastern Studies made history today by being the 1st UK scholarly society to vote to endorse the academic boycott of Israeli universities until they end their complicity with the occupation and violations of Palestinian human rights. It’s so rare that I’m on the winning side that I can’t believe this has happened."   Various Palestinians and pro-Palestinian colleagues have congratulated Pratt for her success, her FB friend Ronit Lentin, an anti-Israel academic- activist, wrote, "Mabrouk comrades!! Shukran." Pratt responded to another FB friend that "MESA next I hope."
 
Pratt has already hit the news once. In 2010 an Israeli student of Pratt, Smadar Bakovic was completing an MA in Warwick University, Department of Politics and International Studies and Pratt was her assigned supervisor. After noting that Pratt chaired an anti-Israel event on campus, Bakovic discovered that Pratt was a vocal advocate of BDS. Bakovic requested to be assigned to another supervisor but was refused. Later that year Bakovic received her grade from Pratt, a pass. Bakowic accused Pratt of under grading her due to anti-Israel sentiments. In her feedback, Pratt wrote Bakovic, that she had the tendency to "adopt Israeli/Zionist narratives as thought they were uncontested facts." Bakovic decided to appeal against her grade and requested a regrading. After seven months the Complaints Committee agreed to have her dissertation re-marked and in 2011, she was awarded a distinction. 
 
But the BRISMES case has a twist. Immediately after the announcement that BRISMES is endorsing the boycott - which was first published by the Middle East Monitor, a media outlet dedicated to attacking Israel - the officers of BRISMES have published a notice on their website explaining that BRISMES "has not endorsed the academic boycott of Israeli Institutions as advocated by BDS.” While the AGM has voted in favor of a boycott, “This vote is not binding on the Society". 
 
BRISMES was established in 1973 "to encourage and promote the study of the Middle East in the United Kingdom... and to bring together teachers, researchers, students, diplomats, journalists and others who deal professionally with the Middle East."  In reality, it was highjacked to promote pro-Palestinian agenda and to besmirch Israel, acting against British interests.
 





NEWS

Notice

 

The British Society for Middle Eastern Studies (BRISMES) has not endorsed the academic boycott of Israeli Institutions as advocated by BDS (Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions).

There was an indicative vote of the membership held at the Annual General Meeting. The majority of those attending voted in favour of the boycott. This vote is not binding on the Society.

The Society’s position on BDS remains that which was endorsed at the 2015 Annual General meeting:

‘Mindful of current developments in the Middle East and North Africa, which have created an atmosphere of almost unprecedented uncertainty about the future of the region; and recognising the variety of deeply-held views on the part of BRISMES members and others on the political and ethical issues involved; BRISMES takes this opportunity to:

—reaffirm the non-political nature of the Society and the commitment enshrined in the Society’s Constitution to encourage cooperation among persons and organisations concerned with the scholarly study of the region;

—reaffirm the right of BRISMES members and others to engage in open and transparent discussion of all relevant issues, including those related to BDS, in an atmosphere free from intimidation and censorship;

—confirm that the BRISMES annual conference continues to represent an appropriate forum for such discussions;

—deplore all measures, on the part of whatever authority, that restrict legitimate academic activity and/or hinder academic cooperation between researchers within and outside the region;

—commit to organising discussions at the BRISMES Annual Conference or other appropriate fora and provide a platform for debating BDS.


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https://www.timesofisrael.com/uk-society-for-middle-eastern-studies-passes-israel-academic-boycott-resolution/  

UK Society for Middle Eastern Studies passes Israel academic boycott resolution
Motion accuses Israeli universities of providing justification for extra-judicial killings and systematically discriminating against non-Jewish students
By JTA
27 June 2019, 12:37 am  1

The British Society for Middle Eastern Studies passed a resolution calling for an academic boycott of Israeli institutions.

The boycott passed on Monday at the society’s annual general meeting in Leeds with almost 80 percent support, according to the Middle East Monitor.


The society, known as BRISMES, was founded in 1973 to encourage and promote the study of the Middle East in the United Kingdom, according to its website.


The resolution charges that Israel has “obstructed Palestinians’ right to education by destroying Palestinian universities and schools, arresting students, raiding and forcing Palestinian universities to close, and restricting Palestinians’ movement.”

It also claims that “Israeli universities are playing a key role in planning, implementing and justifying Israel’s illegal military occupation and are maintaining a close and supportive relationship with the Israeli military, including involvement in developing weapon systems, providing justification for military actions and extra-judicial killings, rewarding students serving in the occupation forces, designing and delivering special program for soldiers and officers, building on occupied land, and systematically discriminating against non-Jewish students.”

The resolution notes that the boycott pertains to Israeli academic institutions only and not to individual scholars. It says that the society will “facilitate educational events, discussions and debates among its membership on the boycott of Israeli academic institutions, including through its publications, conferences and relevant events” and will “educate its members about ways to apply the boycott of Israeli academic institutions in their own professional practice, and encourage them to do so.”


=================================================

British Society for Middle Eastern Studies endorses boycott of Israeli universities

June 25, 2019 at 12:07 pm

 

The British Society for Middle Eastern Studies (BRISMES) has endorsed the Palestinian call for a boycott of Israeli academic institutions, in a vote taken at its AGM in Leeds on Monday.

According to reports on social media, the resolution supporting the Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions (BDS) campaign was easily passed, with almost 80 percent support (final numbers to be confirmed).

The resolution highlights Israel’s obstruction of “Palestinians’ right to education by destroying Palestinian universities and schools, arresting students, raiding and forcing Palestinian universities to close, and restricting Palestinians’ movement”.

The text goes on to describe the “key role” played by Israeli universities “in planning, implementing and justifying Israel’s illegal military occupation”, and claims such institutions “are maintaining a close and supportive relationship with the Israeli military”.

Example of this relationship include “involvement in developing weapon systems, providing justification for military actions and extra-judicial killings, rewarding students serving in the occupation forces, designing and delivering special programmes for soldiers and officers, building on occupied land, and systematically discriminating against non-Jewish students”.

Proposed by Professor John Chalcraft (LSE) and seconded by Dr Rafeef Ziadah (SOAS), the resolution commits BRISMES to “endorsing the call for a boycott of Israeli academic institutions until these institutions publicly end their support and complicity in violating Palestinian rights as stipulated in international law”.

After the resolution passed, Dr Ziadah tweeted: “members of #BRISMES2019 passed a #BDS resolution @ annual general meeting earlier today. This was a real grassroots campaign, long time in the making. Congratulations to every single person who worked tirelessly to make this happen!”

Palestinian boycott campaigners welcomed the move, and urged other international academic societies to take “similar measures against racism and oppression”.

BRISMES was established in 1973 “to encourage and promote the study of the Middle East in the United Kingdom”, and brings together “teachers, researchers, students, diplomats, journalists and others who deal professionally with the Middle East”.


========================================


Jewish Groups Condemn British Society for Middle East Studies’ BDS Endorsement
BY AARON BANDLER | JUN 27, 2019 | WORLD    
Photo from Wikimedia Commons.
Myriad Jewish groups condemned the British Society for Middle East Studies’ (BRISMES) June 26 resolution endorsing the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions movement in statements to the Journal.

BRISMES’ website describes the organization as urging people to study and get involved in Middle Eastern history. The resolution, which passed with nearly 80 percent in favor at BRISMES’ yearly general meeting in Leeds, calls for Israeli academic institutions to be boycotted until they “publicly end their support and complicity in violating Palestinian rights as stipulated in international law.”
 
“Israeli universities are playing a key role in planning, implementing and justifying Israel’s illegal military occupation and are maintaining a close and supportive relationship with the Israeli military, including involvement in developing weapon systems, providing justification for military actions and extra-judicial killings, rewarding students serving in the occupation forces, designing and delivering special programs for soldiers and officers, building on occupied land, and systematically discriminating against non-Jewish students,” the resolution states.

Associate Dean and Director of Global Social Action Agenda at the Simon Wiesenthal Center Rabbi Abraham Cooper said in a statement to the Journal, “Here is the true face of BRISMES: They release as letter in January of 2019 denouncing the IHRA [International Holocaust Remembrance Alliance] definition of anti-Semitism, because it allegedly would limit the free speech to condemn Zionism and the Jewish State. However, their concerns for free speech disappear like invisible ink when it comes to Israel academic institutions of higher learning with a smug 80% of the members voting for an academic boycott of Hebrew University, Tel Aviv University, etc.”
 
He proceeded to call member of BRISMES “smug, hypocritical ‘academics’ committed to demonize and delegitimize the lone democracy in the Middle East- the Jewish state and people of Israel.”

American Jewish Committee Los Angeles Assistant Director of Interreligious and Intercommunity Affairs Saba Soomekh similarly said in a statement to the Journal, “Academic boycotts are the antithesis of what universities stand for. Universities should be the place where students hear explanations of why people believe their narratives are valid; where professors help students understand the complexities of Israeli-Palestinian conflict.” Soomekh added that the BRISMES resolution was “one-sided” and didn’t put any blame on Hamas or the Palestinian Authority.
 
StandWithUs UK Executive Director Raphael Wein also said in a statement to the Journal that “BRISMES is choosing to stand on the wrong side of history and progress,” arguing that the resolution will negatively impact “Middle Eastern Studies students across the UK and BRISMES itself, not Israel.”


===========================================

JUN 24 BRISMES Annual Conference 2019: Interdisciplinarity in Middle East Studies

Description

In collaboration with the department of Arabic, Islamic, and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Leeds, the British Society for Middle Eastern Studies will hold its 2019 Annual Conference on the theme of ‘Joining the Dots: Interdisciplinarity in Middle East Studies'.

The BRISMES Conference is the largest annual academic meeting of Middle East experts in the UK. We are delighted to welcome two outstanding keynote speakers: Professor Mona Harb (AUB) and Professor Salman Sayyid (University of Leeds). The event will also include over eighty panel sessions, a welcome drinks reception featuring The Nyawa Quartet musicians, a publishers' exhibition, and lunch for delegates on Tuesday 25th and Wednesday 26th June.

We will also host a conference dinner on Tuesday 25th June and will make separate tickets available for booking closer to the conference.

More information at www.brismes.ac.uk/conference

Though ‘interdisciplinarity’ is consistently upheld as an important and necessary aspect of enterprising scholarly research within the field of Middle Eastern Studies, the precise nature of effective interdisciplinary research remains underexplored. The 2019 BRISMES Conference seeks to celebrate interdisciplinarity as vital in understanding the interconnectedness of the social, cultural, political and economic structures and conditions throughout the Middle East and North Africa, and explore how disciplinary silos can be overcome in favour of communication between the humanities, social sciences and language studies on the region. To this end, the conference hopes to provide a forum for an open and wide-ranging debate on good practice in interdisciplinary design and research, its challenges as well as its potential of unlocking the complexities of the region.

Arabic, Islamic and Middle Eastern Studies (AIMES) at the University of Leeds itself embodies this aim towards scholarly cross-pollination and collaboration across disciplines, offering a diverse teaching portfolio in the fields of Arabic language, translation, literature, politics, history, culture and Islamic studies and sustaining a vibrant research culture that fosters cross-disciplinary collaboration not only within the Department but across the School of Languages, Cultures and Societies and beyond.

At the 2018 BRISMES conference, the suppression and denial of academic and creative freedom across the region emerged as an urgent and shared concern across all disciplines. Combined with issues of instituted academic precarity, and the continuing discrepancy of resources between Middle Eastern and Western universities, it is clear that the political and economic pressures on Middle Eastern Studies are considerable and ongoing. In this context, interdisciplinary work has the potential to cultivate empathic connections and professional solidarity, and to generate new methodological and conceptual responses to these challenges.

The 2019 BRISMES conference encourages proposals that take up the conference theme in innovative and original directions: bringing different disciplines and fields into productive dialogue with one another, exploring the opportunities and limitations which interdisciplinary research presents, and reflecting on the various ways in challenges to Middle Eastern studies (be it social, political, ethical or otherwise) can be illuminated, and indeed countered, by interdisciplinary approaches to scholarship.


==============================================


2019 BRISMES Conference
Joining the Dots:
Interdisciplinarity in Middle East Studies
University of Leeds
Conference Schedule
This schedule can be used as a reference until you pick up your copy of the full conference programme
on arrival at the registration desk.
1
Monday 24 June 2019
10:30 Registration opens [tea/coffee available @11:00]
The Registration Desk will be located in Parkinson Court
11:30 BRISMES Student Event: Mentoring for Careers in the Middle East
Michael Sadler LG15
12:30 BRISMES AGM [open to all BRISMES members]
Michael Sadler LG19
14:00 – 16:00 Panel Sessions 1
Room
Panel ID and Title
Parkinson Rm 1.08
1A / The Power of Civil Society in the Middle East and North Africa: Peace-Building, Change, and Development
Parkinson Rm B.08
1B / Experimental Fictions
Parkinson Rm B.09
1C / States of Contention: (Re) Imagining the State From Below
Baines Wing G36
1D / Towards A New Ethnography I: Researcher Ethics, Positionality and Security in the Post-2011 Middle East
Parkinson Rm B.10
1E/ Staying under the Radar: Conducting Political Research in Contemporary Egypt
Michael Sadler LG19
1F / Facts on the Ground: Environment and Ecology
Michael Sadler LG15
1G/ Interdisciplinary Infrastructures: Architecture and Archaeology
Michael Sadler LG10
1H/ State-Society Relations in Iraq
Parkinson Bldg, Chemistry LT D
1I / Identit(ies) and Heritage in the UAE: Examining the Roles of Kinship, Family and the State
Parkinson Rm B.11
1J / Arabic Legal Translation and Interpreting in the Context of Crisis: Challenges and Future Prospects
16:15 – 17:45 Plenary 1: Professor Mona Harb, American University of Beirut
Rupert Beckett Lecture Theatre, Michael Sadler Building
2
17:45 – 19:00 Welcome Drinks Reception @ Parkinson Court
Music by members of The Nyawa Quartet
Announcement of the shortlist for the British-Kuwait Friendship Society Book Prize 2019
Presentation of the BRISMES Award for Services to Middle Eastern Studies to Paul Auchterlonie
3
Tuesday 25 June 2019
09:00 – 11:00 Panel Sessions 2
Room
Panel ID and Title
Parkinson Bldg, Chemistry LT D
2A / Critical Perspectives on International Law and Human Rights in the Middle East
Parkinson Rm B.08
2B / Connected Histories and Politics of Pan-Islamism and Islamism
Parkinson Rm B.11
2C / Islamic Finance, Charity, and Political Economy
Parkinson Rm B.09
2D / Stagnation Versus Adaptation: Tracking the Evolution of the Muslim Brotherhood’s Strategies and Ideology since the 2013 Coup
Baines Wing G36
2E / Histories of Islam in the Gulf
Michael Sadler LG19
2F / Queering Modern Turkish Literature
Parkinson Rm 1.08
2G / Political Imaginaries and Social Visions in Post-2011 Egypt
Michael Sadler LG10
2H / Spotlight on Saudi Arabia: Law, Sociology, and Policymaking
Parkinson Rm B.10
2I / Displacements and Diaspora: Transformations in the Middle East and North Africa I
Michael Sadler LG15
2J / Minorities in the Middle East: Yezidi and Kurdish Experiences
11:00 Coffee break @Parkinson Court
11:30 Panel Sessions 3
Room
Panel ID and Title
Parkinson Rm 1.08
3A / Masculinities, Conflict, and Displacement
Parkinson Rm B.08
3B / Musical Encounters Between the Maghreb and Europe: Questions, Approaches, and Methodologies
Michael Sadler LG19
3C / Conducting "Difficult" Research as a Woman in the Middle East
4
Michael Sadler LG10
3D / The Politics of Materiality and Infrastructure in the MENA Region
Parkinson Bldg Chemistry LT D
3E / Critical Middle East Studies (CMES) Panel I: Egypt and the Politics of Critique
Michael Sadler LG15
3F / Future Ecologies and Apocalypse Now: Climate Change in the Middle East
Parkinson Rm B.11
3G / Analysing Jihadist Discourse and Ideology
Baines Wing G36
3H / The Middle East in the World: International Relations and Foreign Policy
Parkinson Rm B.09
3I / Language, Linguistics, and Orality
Parkinson Rm B.10
3J / Politics and Society in Tunisia
13:30 Lunch Break: for collection @ Parkinson Court
14:30 – 16:00 Plenary 2: Professor Salman Sayyid
Rupert Beckett Lecture Theatre, Michael Sadler Building
16:00 Coffee break @ Parkinson Court
16:30 – 18:30 Panel Sessions 4
Room
Panel ID and Title
Parkinson Rm 1.08
4A / Unsettling Israel Studies
Parkinson Rm B.09
4B / Poetry, Music, Folklore and Resistance
Parkinson Bldg, Chemistry LT D
4C / Saudi Arabia, Iran, and the Sectarianisation of the Middle East
Michael Sadler LG10
4D / Critical Middle East Studies (CMES) Panel II: Fieldwork, Ethics and Critique
Michael Sadler LG15
4E / Memories, Resistance and Significance of Remembering in Post-2011 Egypt
Parkinson Rm B.08
4F / South-South Comparative Studies
Michael Sadler LG19
4G / Socio-cultural Imaginaries: Visual, Narrative, Musical
5
Baines Wing G36
4H / Problems and Methodologies Across Disciplines
Parkinson Rm B.10
4I / Situating Knowledge-Production in the Middle East: Revolutions, Reflexivity, and Historiography
Parkinson Rm B.11
4J / Stagnation Versus Adaptation: Tracking the Evolution of the Muslim Brotherhood's Strategies and Ideology Since the 2013 Coup
19:00 – 21:00 Conference Dinner @ Refectory South
**Please note that the conference dinner is not included in the conference ticket and will require a separate booking. Booking will open in June**
6
Wednesday 26 June 2019
08:45* – 10:45 Panel Sessions 5
*note earlier start 8:45am
Room
Panel ID and Title
Parkinson Rm 1.08
5A / Interdisciplinarity, Academic Freedom, Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions, and Palestine
Parkinson Bldg, Chemistry LT D
5B / Goethe's West-Eastern Divan 200 years on
Michael Sadler LG10
5C / Critical Middle East Studies (CMES) Panel III: Conditions of Critique(s)
Michael Sadler LG19
5D / Migrating from Islamic Studies to Critical Muslim Studies
Michael Sadler LG15
5E / Using Field Data to Study Social Capital in the Post-Arab Spring Arab World
Baines Wing G36
5F / Refugeeism and Forced Migration: Transformations in the Middle East and North Africa II
Parkinson Rm B.08
5G / Education, Islam, and Knowledge Production
Parkinson Rm B.09
5H / Memory, Resistance, and Dissent in Literature
Parkinson Rm B.10
5I / Egypt: Politics, Economics, Sociology
10:45 Coffee break @Parkinson Court
11:15 – 13:15 Panel Sessions 6
Room
Panel ID and Title
Michael Sadler LG15
6A / Is Heritage Preservation a Zero-Sum Game? The Open-Ended, Overlapping Geographies of the Bedouin
Parkinson Bldg, Chemistry LT D
6B / Who Do We Write For? Reflecting on Audiences, Genres, and Accountability in Contemporary Middle East Scholarship
Sponsored by the Arab Council for the Social Sciences (ACSS)
Michael Sadler LG19
6C / Interdisciplinary Approaches: Security Studies
Parkinson Rm 1.08
6D / Property Rights and Political Rights in Egypt, Syria, and Turkey (Nineteenth to Twenty-First Centuries)
7
Parkinson Rm B.08
6E / Turkey: Domestic and International Policies
Parkinson Rm B.09
6F / Universities and Youth Activism in the Middle East and North Africa
Michael Sadler LG10
6G / Civil War, Sectarianism, and Non-State Actors
Parkinson Rm B.10
6H / Interdisciplinary Approaches: the GCC
Baines Wing G36
6I / Session on Academic Publishing
13:15** Lunch Break: for collection @ Parkinson Court
**Note shorter lunch break (30 mins)**
13:45 – 15:45 Panel Sessions 7
Room
Panel ID and Title
Michael Sadler LG10
7A / DeSectarianisation: Peace Building in the "New Politics of the Middle East"
Michael Sadler LG15
7B / Gender Identity and Masculinity Studies
Parkinson Rm B.08
7C / Early Islam Through Interdisciplinarity
Michael Sadler LG19
7D / Understanding Tensions in Imagined Territories: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Parkinson Bldg, Chemistry LT D
7E / Re-reading Colonial Encounters in Palestine: Toward a Decolonial Future
Parkinson Rm 1.08
7F / Politics and Society in the Maghreb: Morocco and Algeria
Parkinson Rm B.10
7G / Interdisciplinary Approaches to Iran: part I
Parkinson Rm B.11
7H / Society and Culture of the Ottoman Period
Parkinson Rm B.09
7I / Media, Discourse Analysis and Visual Representations
Baines Wing G36
7J / Clerical Networks, Discourses, and the State in Modern Twelver Shi’ism
8
15:45 Coffee break @ Parkinson Court
16:15 – 18:15 Panel sessions 8
Room
Panel ID and Title
Baines Wing G36
8B / Engendering the Islamicate Modern
Michael Sadler LG10
8C / Towards a New Ethnography II: Researcher Ethics, Positionality and Security in the Post-2011 Middle East
Michael Sadler LG15
8D / Liberation, Authoritarianism and Securitisation: Conceptualising Conflict in Israel/Palestine
Parkinson Rm B.08
8E / Interdisciplinary Approaches to Iran: part II
Parkinson Rm 1.08
8F / Twenty-First Century Iraq
Michael Sadler LG19
8G / Philosophy and Cultural Heritage
― End of conference ―
9
Panel Details
Monday 24 June, 14:00 – 16:00
1A The Power of Civil Society in the Middle East and North Africa: Peace-building, Change, and Development
Organised by: Lilian Tauber, University of Durham
The Power of Civil Society and Young Leaders' Engagement in Non-Violent Actions in Palestine Ibrahim Natil, Dublin City University
Social Entrepreneurship, Civil Society, and Foreign Aid in Jordan: Addressing Issues of Self-Sustainability and Continuity
Lilian Tauber, University of Durham
Human Rights Organisations and Navigating the Political Configuration of Power in post-2011 Egypt Ahmed El Assal, Institute of Development Studies
UNRWA in Crisis: A Historical Perspective
Anne Irfan, London School of Economics and Political Science/University of Sussex
1B Experimental Fictions
Modernity and Gender Representations in Zakariyya Tamir: an interdisciplinary approach to modern Arabic literature
Alessandro Columbu, The University of Manchester
Depicting Amman in Jordanian contemporary literature
Ismael Abder-rahman Gil, Ca' Foscari University of Venice
Pomo Gents: Masculinity & Postmodernism in Contemporary Arabic Fiction
Hanan Jasim Khammas, Autonomous University of Barcelona (UAB)
Masculinity studies and Syrian fiction
Lovisa Berg, Dalarna University
Multilingual Counterpoint in Nuruddin Farah's Sardines and Maps
Tayseer Abu Odeh, Arab Open University
1C States of Contention: (Re) Imagining the State From Below
Organised by: Jose Ciro Martinez, University of Cambridge
Ambiguities of Stateness: Marginalisation and Claim-Making in the Jordanian South
Jose Ciro Martinez, University of Cambridge
Fragmentation as a Tool of Power: The State in Bourj el Barajne
Dima Krayem, University of Cambridge
Invoking the State from below: Tunisian border populations and representations of the post-revolutionary State
Ruth Hanau Santini, Université L’Orientale
10
Organic intellectuals? A Gramscian analysis of the Syrian generation post-uprising
Adélie Chevée, SOAS - University of London
1D Towards a new ethnography I: Researcher ethics, positionality and security in the post 2011 Middle East
Organised by: Marta Agosti, SOAS - University of London
TransPrecarity: the other and white privilege, reflections of doing fieldwork in Egypt post June 30
Marta Agosti, SOAS - University of London
Bas Enti min Afrika Aslan (But You Are Originally from Africa)
Sandra A. Fernandez, University of St Andrews
Doing fieldwork in war zones of the Middle East; safety, intuition and ethics
Josepha Ivanka Wessels, Lund University
In the time of fear: Navigating and maneuvering the military landscapes
Alaa Moustafa Attiah, American University in Cairo
Researching Israeli illegal settlement in Palestine: deception, risk, health, and the “grey area”
Anya Evans, London School of Economics and Political Science
1E Staying under the Radar: Conducting Political Research in Contemporary Egypt
Organised by: Nicola Pratt, University of Warwick // Chaired by: John Chalcraft, London School of Economics and Political Science
Conceptualising Popular Culture as Political
Nicola Pratt, University of Warwick
Bassem Youssef and Egyptian satire since 2011: Unsettling Laughter and Resistance
Dina Rezk, University of Reading
Studying Egypt’s Uprising through its Art
Mohamed El-Shewy, University of Warwick
Politics and the city: researching Cairo through fragments
Aya Nasar, University of Sussex
1F Facts on the Ground: Environment and Ecology
Protection of the environment under the law of occupation: the case of the occupied Golan Heights
Michael Mason, Middle East Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science
Water, Peace and Security in the Middle East
Kyra Luchtenberg, Middle East Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science
Common Intention, Different Articulations: Discourses of contemporary Islamic environmental ethics
Jakub Kolácek, Charles University in Prague
Al-Bīrūnī’s understanding of hydrology and environmental hydraulics in the Kitāb al-Āṯār al-Bāqiya
Massimiliano Borroni, Ca' Foscari University of Venice and Vladimiro Boselli University of Brescia
11
1G Interdisciplinary Infrastructures: Architecture and Archaeology
Worlding ME City Socio-Political Imaginaries
Bruce Stanley, Richmond University (London)
Architectures of inequality: joining social research with architectural studies
Alice Stefanelli, Durham University
Geology & Art: A sustainable approach for a complex area
Nawrast Abd Alwahab, University of Basrah and Kelcy Davenport, Anglia Ruskin University
Recontextualizing the Justice Tower: An analysis from the junction of Law and Architecture
Gizem Sivri, Princeton University and Zekeriya Efe Antalyali, Bilgi University
1H State-Society Relations in Iraq
Identity, Traditions and Culture transformations through the lens of urban development
Ula Merie, University of Sheffield
The State and its Militias: How are the Popular Mobilisation Units (PMU) challenging the state’s monopoly on the legitimate use of force in Iraq?
Inna Rudolf, King's College London
Basra Between Two Separatist Claims
Chérine Chams El-Dine, Cairo University
Anticolonial Resistance in the Post-Ottoman Mashriq: Examining the Iraqi Jazirah
Rebecca Irvine, CMES, Lund University
State-Society Relations in Revolutionary Iraq (1958-1963)
Aula Hariri, Middle East Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science
1I Identit(ies) and Heritage in the UAE: Examining the Roles of Kinship, Family and the State
Co-organised by Courtney Freer Middle East Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science & Rima Sabban, Zayed University
Containing Anarchy and Fundamentalism via national identity: Role of State and Identity formation in the UAE
Fatima al-Karbi, Durham University
Nationalism, Tribalism and Heritage
Courtney Freer, Middle East Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science
‘Deserving Citizens’ and ‘Undeserving Migrants'
Idil Akinci, University of Sussex
Identity-making through Heritage: The Emirati Experience
Yasmine Kherfi, Middle East Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science
12
1J Arabic Legal Translation and Interpreting in the Context of Crisis: Challenges and Future Prospects
Organised by Hanem El-Farahaty, University of Leeds
To Domesticate or to Exoticise?: Levels of challenges in translating documents of human rights cases
Neveen Al Saeed, Ain Shams University and Doaa Embabi, Ain Shams University
A Corpus-Based Analysis of Deontic Modality of Obligation and Permission in Arabic/English Constitutions
Hanem El-Farahaty, University of Leeds
Put on Record (POR) Questions: Interviewing tools or a prosecutor's weapon?
Neveen Al Saeed, Ain Shams University
13
Tuesday 25 June, 09:00-11:00
2A Critical perspectives on international law and human rights in the Middle East
Co-organised by Neve Gordon, Queen Mary, University of London and Nicola Perugini, University of Edinburgh
'We Were Basically Pioneers': Lawyers, Laws of War, and the Shrinking Civilian
John Reynolds, National University of Ireland, Maynooth (co-authored by Noura Erakat, George Mason University)
Who is the civilian? Investigating the perspectives of Palestinians under attack and Israeli military lawyers
Maayan Geva, University of Roehampton
Visions of Territory: Negotiating the Future of the Middle East 1915-1923
Karin Loevy, NYU Law School
Human Shields and the Justification of State Violence in the Contemporary Middle East
Nicola Perugini, University of Edinburgh (co-authored by Neve Gordon)
The World Tribunal on Iraq and the limits of transnational legal activism
Ayça Çubukçu, London School of Economics and Political Science
2B Connected Histories and politics of Pan-Islamism and Islamism
Organised by: Tajul Islam, University of Leeds
Theological ecumenism in Pan-Islamist movements: A Critical Muslim Studies approach
Tajul Islam, University of Leeds
Caliphate As Transnational Metaphor: A Decolonial Analysis of the Mappila Caliphate (1921)
Sheheen Kattiparambil, University of Leeds
Islamism as the 'Political': Struggle from within the Kemalist Hegemony
Sumeyye Sakarya, University of Leeds
Mobilizing and Conceiving Umma in the (Post-)Colonial Metropole: Decolonial Muslim political activism and thought in Britain before and after decolonisation
Jonathan Birt, University of Leeds
From the Hubris of Hegemony, Toward a Decolonial Horizon: Jihad, Resistance, and Liberation
Junaid Ahmad, University of Leeds
2C Islamic Finance, Charity, and Political Economy
Reciprocal Effect: Zakat and Islamic Political Economy
Ola Alkahlout, Coventry University
Capital structure and political connections: Evidence from GCC countries
Fatma Ahmed, Swansea University
14
When It Comes to Risk, is Sukuk Better than Conventional Bonds? A Comparative Study of NASDAQ Securities
Alija Avdukic, Markfield Institute of Higher Education, Leicestershire
Islamic Humanitarian Organisations: a critical state of art between France and the UK
Lucas Faure, Institut d'Etudes Politiques d'Aix-en-Provence - University of Birmingham
Social Entrepreneurs' Responses to the Refugee Crisis in Jordan and Lebanon
Katarzyna Sidlo, CASE - Center for Social and Economic Research (co-authored by Mohammed Aljafari, IP Commercialization Office at iPARK Royal Scientific Society Amman, Jordan)
2D Stagnation versus Adaptation: tracking the evolution of the Muslim Brotherhood’s strategies and ideology since the 2013 coup
Organised by: Lucia Ardovini, The Swedish Institute of International Affairs and Erica Biagini, Dublin City University
Preachers, not Leaders: The MB’s Identity Quest in the Aftermath of 2013
Lucia Ardovini, The Swedish Institute of International Affairs
Re-conceptualising the Muslim Brotherhood: From Social Movement to Political Organization
Victor Willi, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies
Rehabilitating the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood’s Image Through Activism Outside Egypt
Nicholas Gjorvad, Berlin Graduate School Muslim Cultures and Societies
The Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood’s Sister’ Branch: trajectories of change and continuities and their effects on the movement’s survival
Sara Tonsy, University of Aix Marseille
2E Histories of Islam in the Gulf
Organised by: Alexandre Caeiro, Hamad Bin Khalifa University
The Religious and the Political in Sheikh Qassim Al Thani’s Writings
Reem Al-Sada, Hamad Bin Khalifa University
The Politics of Islamic Law in the Gulf: Islamic Institutions and Nation-Building in Twentieth Century Qatar
Alexandre Caeiro, Hamad Bin Khalifa University
The Transplantation of South Asian Religious Networks to the Gulf: A Study of the Barelwi AP Movement in Qatar (1980s-2010s)
Ashraf Thachara Padikkal, Hamad Bin Khalifa University
Transformations of Religious Knowledge in a Diasporic Setting: The case of the Patani Meccan community (1950s-2010s)
Bushra Salaebing, Hamad Bin Khalifa University
2F Queering Modern Turkish Literature
Organised by: Etienne Charrière, Bilkent University
15
Turkish Queer, Republican Camp: Nahid Sırrı Örik and the Limits of Gay Literary Historiography
Etienne Charrière, Bilkent University
Dark Rooms of the Nation: Yusuf Atılgan’s Motherland Hotel (1973) as a Queer Novel
Peter Cherry, Bilkent University
Violence, Writing and Queer Fiction: On Bilge Karasu’s Night (1985)
Selen Erdoğan, Boğaziçi University
"Marginally Capital": A Queer Reading of Murathan Mungan's Early Works
Sylvain Cavaillès, Independent Scholar
Dismantling Heteronormative Desires and Bodies: Reading Hasan Ali Toptaş through a Queer Lens Sevcan Tiftik, Mimar Sinan University
2G Political Imaginaries and Social Visions in Post-2011 Egypt
Egypt's Constitution and the Politics of Language and Identity: A Critical Discourse Analysis study Mariam Aboelezz, Birkbeck, University of London
Towards a Utopian-Prefigurative Reimagining of Legal Mobilisation: The Case of Egyptian Activist Lawyers since the 2011 Revolution
Mo Afshary, University of Kent
University Could cooperation be primed? Experimental evidence from Egypt
Mazen Hassan, Cairo University and Sarah Mansour, Cairo University (jointly authored with Engi Amin, Cairo University)
2H Spotlight on Saudi Arabia: Law, Sociology, and Policymaking
Social Science Research in Saudi Arabia: A Reflection on Methodological Optimization
Muhammad Saeed, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals
Legal Flexibility in Saudi Arabia: Perspectives from Continental European Legal Thought
Dominik Krell, Max Planck Institute for Comparative and International Private Law
Implementing a culture of moderation: Saudi Arabia's call for a "return to moderate Islam" from a socio-political perspective
Annalisa Pavan, University of Padova
Shifting alliances and preferences: why and how Saudi Arabia is modifying its foreign policy under the Salmans
Thomas Demmelhuber, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg
US Hegemony in Saudi-Iranian Relations
Sukru Cildir, Lancaster University
2I Displacements and Diaspora: Transformations in the Middle East and North Africa I
To what extent has consociation excluded new stories of belonging in post conflict Lebanon?
Georgia Littlechild, University of Aberdeen
"Kuwaiti, but Made in the Philippines": Negotiating Kuwaiti National Identity in The Bamboo Stalk
Nadeen Dakkak University of Warwick
16
Political sociology and diaspora for the study of politicisation of Syrian identity
Marisa, Della Gatta, Macquarie University
Addressing the vulnerabilization of forced migrants during the migratory journey: discussing the feasibility of the collectivizing the international provision of protection
Hamza Safouane, Helmut Schmidt University (co-authored by Sabith Khan, California Lutheran University)
2J Minorities in the Middle East: Yazidi and Kurdish Experiences
Investigating the ISIS’s Gender-Based Violence Against Yazidi Women in the Region of Iraq
Busra Nisa Sarac, University of Portsmouth
Shifting from communal to political identity: Construction of the Kurdishness in West Azerbaijan province of Iran
Mostafa Khalili, Doshisha University, Kyoto, Japan
Gendered impacts of conflict: Yazidis in Iraq
Zeynep Kaya, Middle East Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science
Trans-Saharan Gender and Sexual Epistemologies: Historical and Anthropological Perspectives
Itzea Goikolea-Amiano, SOAS - University of London
Changing US Perception: How Have the Syrian Kurds Become a Trustful US Ally?
Turgay Demir, University of Leeds
17
Tuesday 25 June 11:30 – 13:30
3A Masculinities, Conflict and Displacement
Organised by: Lewis Turner, Arnold Bergstraesser Institute // Chaired by: Nicola Pratt, University of Warwick
An Inside-Out Empirical Analysis of Post-2011 Masculinity/ies
Sabiha Allouche, SOAS - University of London
The Facade of Queer Alliances: A Case for A Queer Feminist Intersectional Approach
Nof Nasser-Eddin, Centre for Transnational Development and Collaboration (CTDC)
Gendering the March of Return: masculinities and morality in the Gazan protests of 2018
Caitlin Procter, Centre for Middle Eastern Studies, Harvard University
The challenge of turning 18: Coming of age as young refugee men from the Middle East in Germany Magdalena Suerbaum, Max-Planck-Institute for the Study of Religious and Ethnic Diversity
Humanitarianism and Masculinities in the Syria refugee response
Lewis Turner, Arnold Bergstraesser Institute
3B Musical Encounters between the Maghreb and Europe: Questions, Approaches and Methodologies
Organised by: Matthew Machin-Autenrieth, University of Cambridge
Echoes of the Colonial Past: Spanish Music as Cultural Diplomacy in Morocco
Matthew Machin-Autenrieth, University of Cambridge
Music and the Visual in Franco-Algerian Colonial Encounters
Stephen Wilford, University of Cambridge
El Cancionero de mi madre: How the Imprint of Protectorate Cultural Policy Lives on in Contemporary Moroccan Oral Histories
Vanessa Paloma Elbaz, University of Cambridge
Echoes from a Distant Present: Imagining Arab-Andalusian Music in Spain, France and Morocco, 1912-1956
Samuel Llano, University of Manchester
3C Conducting "difficult" research as a woman in the Middle East
Organised by: Jennifer Philippa Eggert, University of Warwick // Chaired by: Annie Webster, SOAS – University of London
Conducting fieldwork on the Lebanese civil war as a parent
Jennifer Philippa Eggert, University of Warwick
Situated Ethics: What else? What is next?
Aya Musmar, University of Sheffield
18
On the difficulty of researching Islamic State (IS) from the perspective of Iraqi female academic Balsam Mustafa, University of Birmingham
Female academics in Aidland: Doing research with refugees in the Middle East
Ann-Christin Wagner, University of Edinburgh
3D The Politics of Materiality and Infrastructure in the MENA region
Organised by: Sharri Plonski, Queen Mary University of London
Infrastructure and Affect: An intersection
Sabrien Amrov, University of Toronto
Colonial and Postcolonial Infrastructure: the Material Politics of Egyptian Decolonisation
Sara Salem, London School of Economics and Political Science
Insurgent Infrastructure: Tunnels of the Gaza Strip
Toufic Haddad, Council for British Research in the Levant (CBRL)
Lebanon’s infrastructural crisis and the materiality of refugee exclusion
Hanna Baumann, University College London
Digital Rights and Infrastructural Proprietorship: Critique of a Non-Palestinian Cyberspace
Fabio Christiano, Lund University
Settler Colonial Materialities: Israel’s Corridor Infrastructures
Sharri Plonski, Queen Mary University of London
3E Critical Middle East Studies (CMES) Panel I: Egypt and the Politics of Critique
Organised by: Vivienne Matthies-Boon, University of Amsterdam
Critical Trauma Studies as Critique: On Condemning the Counter-Revolution in Egypt
Vivienne Matthies-Boon, University of Amsterdam
Human rights between cruelty and critique: themes from the Egyptian human rights movement
Nader Andrawos, London School of Economics and Political Science
Critiquing Middle East Studies’ Archive Fever
Karim Maged Malek, Columbia University
Self-Criticism in Contemporary Arab Thought: Towards a New Form of the Intellectual
Alaa Badr, European University Institute (EUI)
3F Future Ecologies and Apocalypse Now: Climate Change in the Middle East
Chair/Discussant: Sinéad Murphy, King’s College London and BRISMES
Enter the Cli-fi: Environmental Dystopias and Science Fiction in Contemporary Art and Film from the MENA region
Nat Muller, Birmingham City University
Green Trends in Modern Arabic Novel
Jihan Zakarriya, Dhofar University
Contesting the "Apocalypse": Interdisciplinary Research and Climate Change Politics
Dina Zayed, Institute of Development Studies, University of Sussex
19
3G Analysing Jihadist Discourse and Ideology
The Poetic Voice of the Islamic State: A Preliminary Literary Analysis
Kurstin Gatt, Free University Berlin
Travel and estrangement in ISIS publications: constructing ‘the west’ as an intimate enemy
Nabeelah Jaffer, University of Oxford
Adapt or die: The failure of the IS playbook in Yemen
James Paterson, Monash University and Samantha Kruber, Monash University
3H The Middle East in the World: International Relations and Foreign Policy
Refusing membership to International Organisations: Shaping international order through exclusion
Andrew Delatolla, American University in Cairo
De facto states and the War on Terror: The Cases of the Kurdistan Regional Government and Somaliland
Yaniv Voller, University of Kent
Hybridity, Aid Dependency & Women’s Empowerment: Assessing Intentions and Outcomes in Jordan’s Campaign against Domestic Abuse
Jessica Watkins, Middle East Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science
International Relations and Foreign Policy in the Middle East: Hezbollah and PLO as Statelike Actors
Zakia Aqra, University of Peloponnese
Obama's Road to Cairo. The President's Rhetorical Journey 2008-2009
Nils Lukacs, Hamburg University
3I Language, Linguistics and Orality
Chaired by: Ruba Khamam, University of Leeds
The Immigrant Text - The power of mistranslating Arabic
Rabia Barkatulla
Having the Cake and Eating it Too: The Secret Ingredients of Code-Switching in A Girl Made of Dust
Syrine Hout, American University of Beirut
Toward an Interdisciplinary Reassessment of the Kuttab System: Some Thoughts on the Struggle for the Mastery of Classical Arabic
Hussam Ahmed, University of Cambridge
Reforming projects of Arabic script in 20th century and the perception of the future on Arabic type
Farah Abdel Hadi, Anglia Ruskin University
3J Politics & Society in Tunisia
"Why don't I forgive? You didn't ask for forgiveness!": resistance and the politics of unforgiveness in Tunisia
Joshua Rigg, SOAS - University of London
20
Democracy Promotion and the Tunisian Exception
Morgan Williams, University of Sussex
Why so different? Constitution-making design in Egypt and Tunisia after the uprisings
Tereza Jermanová, Charles University
Book launch presentation: Food Insecurity and Revolution in the Middle East and North Africa: Modernisation and Agrarian Questions in Egypt and Tunisia by Habib Ayeb and Raymond Bush Raymond Bush, University of Leeds
21
Tuesday 25 June, 16:30 – 18:30
4A Unsettling Israel Studies
Organised & co-chaired by: Elian Weizman SOAS, University of London and Sharri Plonski,
Queen Mary, University of London
Decolonizing Israel Studies, Palestine Studies, and the Racial University, and what it means for the Future of Palestine
Magid Shihade, Birzeit University
Israel in critical military studies: the elision of settler colonialism
James Eastwood, Queen Mary, University of London
The impossibility of decolonizing Israel studies
Lana Tatour, University of New South Wales
Unsettling knowledge production on Palestine through narratives of Israeli Zionist women settlers in the West Bank
Akanksha Mehta, Goldsmith’s University of London
Settler Colonial Knowledge Production: a material analysis of Israel Studies
Sharri Plonski, Queen Mary, University of London
Engineering “Israel Studies” in the UK: Mapping the Power Structure, Tracing the Processes
Hilary Aked, Independent Scholar
4B Poetry, Music, Folklore and Resistance
Organised by: Marwan Darweish, Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations, Coventry University, UK // Chaired by: Patricia Sellick, Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations, Coventry University
Folk Songs: Celebration and resistance of Palestinians living in Israel 1948-66
Marwan Darweish, Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations, Coventry University
Music and Group Identity Resilience: A Case Study on Palestinian Communities under Israeli Military Occupation 1948-66
Craig Robertson, Nordoff Robbins, Life Changing Music, UK
On a poetry of inexorable resistance: Palestinian poetry in Israel
Ahmad Sa'di, Ben-Gurion University
Gaza’s Great March(es) of Return: Issues of geo-national identity, cultural heritage and resistance Ahmed Tannira, Coventry University
Humor in Contemporary Palestinian Music
Nadeem Karkabi, University of Haifa
4C Saudi Arabia, Iran and the Sectarianisation of the Middle East
Organised by: Simon Mabon, Lancaster University
22
Anti-Shiism without Shia in the Middle East: Theoretical and Empirical Perspectives
May Darwich, Durham University
The unifying power of victory? Sectarianism, power, and legitimacy in post-ISIS Iraq
Jacob Eriksson, University of York
Sectarianising the other: The Shi'a in Bahrain and Yemen
Samira Nasirzadeh, Lancaster, University
4D Critical Middle East Studies (CMES) Panel II: Fieldwork, Ethics and Critique
Organised by: Andrea Teti, University of Aberdeen
On Critique in Middle East Studies: conceptual, Practical and Ethical Considerations; Taking local critique seriously: On how to NOT find your perfect ethnographic example during your research in/on Palestine
Klaudia Rottenschlager, University of Vienna
Critical Approaches to Governance: Fieldwork in Egypt
Sarah Hynek, University of Aberdeen
Can development institutions think critically? Positionality and ethics of development actors in Egypt post June 30
Marta Agosti, SOAS – University of London
4E Memories, Resistance and Significance of Remembering in Post-2011 Egypt
Organised by: Nayera Abdelrahman Soliman, Freie Universitat Berlin // Chaired by Pascale Ghazaleh, American University in Cairo
Remembering in Host Cities: Nubian Memorial Movement(s) in Cairo
Mayada Madbouly, Nanterre University, Paris
Memory, Spatiality, and Affect: The Maspero Triangle
Dina Wahba, Freie Universitat Berlin
Writing Affect from Memory: Remembering Emotions of Street Violence during the Egyptian Revolution
Ahmed Saleh, Freie Universitat Berlin
Remembering through Walking: The Urgency to Remember in South Sinai
Alaa Attiah, American University of Cairo and Social Justice Platform
4F South-South Comparative Studies
Saudi Arabia's policy towards Pakistan: regional security dynamics through the lens of realist and constructivist approach
Agnieszka Kuszewska, Jagiellonian University and Agnieszka Nitza-Makowska, Collegium Civitas
Middle Powers and the Middle East: Malaysian and Indonesian policies since the 2011 Arab uprisings
Guy Burton
Non-Western Xenophobia: Antisemitism in the Middle East and Islamophobia in South Asia, Maryyum Mehmood, SOAS - University of London
23
4G Socio-cultural Imaginaries: Visual, Narrative, Musical
The Persian Graphic Novel: A Diasporic Engagement with Human Rights Violations in the Islamic Republic of Iran
Kate Hashemi, The Middle East Consultancy Services
Toward a Peace Studies Approach to Literature: An Alternative Perspective on the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict
Sawsan Malla Hussein, Abdelmalek Essaadi University (co-authored with Brahim Barhoun)
Re-Imagining Lebanese Socio-Political Landscapes Through Contemporary Arab Traditional Music
Maria Rijo Lopes da Cunha, SOAS, University of London
Gaza and the Humanitarian Space of Cinema
Viviane Saglier, Concordia University
Policing the Virtuous in Post-Gaddafi Libya
Leila Tayeb, Cornell University
4H Problems & Methodologies Across Disciplines
Chair
The Challenges of Interdisciplinarity in a Post-/Neo-Colonial Disciplinary World
Aminah Khan, University of Central Lancashire
Disciplinary and interdisciplinary studies: Problems and questions in approaching Historical Study in the Middle East
Adam Hogan, University of Exeter
The Body as an Interdisciplinary Text
Haneen Omari, Leiden University
Re-Orienting Ethnography: Faith, Love and Strangers
Sarah Marusek, University of Leeds
Actual vs. potential dominance of space's occupiers: an analysis of crowds' competition during protest events in Beirut, Lebanon
Reem Albarakat, University of Leeds
4I Situating Knowledge-Production in the Middle East: Revolutions, Reflexivity, and Historiography
Organised by: Marral Shamshiri-Fard, London School of Economics and Political Science
Reflexivity in Historical Knowledge-Production: Iranian Revolutionaries, the Dhofar Revolution and the Radical Archive
Marral Shamshiri-Fard, London School of Economics and Political Science
Diplomatic Reflexivity: Knowledge Production, Diplomacy and entry into International Society
Alireza Shams-Lahijani, London School of Economics and Political Science
“The weight of a gun's magazine:” Locating the Palestinian Revolutionary Movement in the Tricontinental Magazine, 1967 – 1973
24
Neha Shah, University of Oxford
International Solidarity with the Palestinian Revolution: Mapping the Practice of Anticolonialism
Sorcha Thomson, I.B. Tauris
4J Stagnation VS. Adaptation: tracking the evolution of the Muslim Brotherhood's strategies and ideology since the 2013 coup
Co-organised by: Erika Biagini, Dublin City University and Lucia Ardovini, The Swedish Institute of International Affairs
"Victory is closer than we imagine": Muslim Brotherhood discourses of defiance between the 2013 coup and Rabaa
Andrea Jud, Freie University Berlin
Re-examining Hasan al-Banna’s Model of Da’wah in the Post-Arab Spring Era
Khalidah Ali, University of Toronto
What does it mean to be ex-Ikhwan? Dynamics of Disengagement from the Muslim Brotherhood after 2011
Mustafa Menshawy, Doha Institute for Graduate Studies and by Khalil Al-Anani, Doha Institute for Graduate Studies
What the future holds for women in the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood? An exploration of Muslim Sisterhood worldviews and desires post-2013
Erika Biagini, Dublin City University
25
Wednesday 26 June, 08:45 – 10:45
5A Interdisciplinarity, Academic Freedom, Boycott, Divestment, Sanctions, and Palestine
Organised by: John Chalcraft, London School of Economics and Political Science
A praxis of solidarity: Palestine, Stop G4S and the Prison Industrial Complex
Rafeef Ziadah, SOAS - University of London
BDS and the Boycott of Study Abroad Programs to Israel
Bill Mullen, Purdue University
The Academic Boycott Movement in the US: Academic (Un)Freedom and Decolonizing Palestine Sunaina Maira, University of California, Davis
Transnational Solidarity with Palestine: lessons about the articulation of struggles from participatory action research
John Chalcraft, London School of Economics and Political Science
TBD
Balsam Mustafa, University of Birmingham
5B Goethe's West-Eastern Divan 200 years on
Organised by: Barbara Schwepcke, Gingko Library // Chair: Paul Luft, Durham University
An Imagined East: Translating Goethe's West-Eastern Divan
Eric Ormsby, Institute of Ismaili Studies
Goethes 'Divan' -- seine Wirkung in Deutschland (Goethe's Divan -- its impact on Germany)
Hendrik Birus, Jacob’s University, Bremen
Hafiz and the Challenges of Translating Persian Poetry into English
Narguess Farzad, SOAS - University of London
Bringing Persia to Germany: Joseph von Hammer and Hafiz
Sibylle Wentker, Austrian Academy of Science
TBD
Fatemeh Shams, University of Pennsylvania
5C Critical Middle East Studies (CMES) Panel III: Conditions of critique(s)
Organised by: Vivienne Matthies-Boon, University of Amsterdam
The limits and possibilities of Critical Middle East Studies
Sami Zemni, University of Ghent
Why Keep Fighting the Last War? The Politics of Impossible Interdisciplinarity in Social Science Andrea Teti, University of Aberdeen
Critique as Metaphysical Disobedience
Ali Harfouch, American University of Beirut
Poetry and Modernity in the Arab East: A Political History, 1948-67
26
Adey Almohsen, University of Minnesota
5D Migrating from Islamic Studies to Critical Muslim Studies
Organised by: Mustapha Sheikh, University of Leeds
Un-mooring orientalist assumptions about Muslims and their law
Mustapha Sheikh, University of Leeds
Critical Muslim Studies and the possibilities of (re)thinking Riba
Sitara Akram, University of Leeds
The Khatim an-Nabiyyin (The Seal of Prophecy) and its inclusive-Abrahamic perspective. Muslim’s religious identity in dialogue
Marco Demichelis, University of Navarra
Training a generation: The Language of Islamophobia in the context of the UK’s Prevent policy
Claudia Radivan, University of Leeds
Islamophobia: A PostGraduate Landcape
Ismail Patel, University of Leeds
5E Using Field Data to Study Social Capital in the Post-Arab Spring Arab World
Organised by: Mazen Hassan, Cairo University
Different Outcomes of the Arab Spring and Socio-economic Values: Experimental evidence from Egypt, Jordan and Tunisia
Mazen Hassan, Cairo University (jointly authored with Sarah Mansour, Cairo University and Engi Amin, Cairo University)
Political Trust and Participation in the MENA
Nadine Sika, American University in Cairo
Godly Trust: The Coptic Church Service System and Its Impact on Social Capital in Egypt
Ramy Magdy, Cairo University
Egyptian Rural Markets as a New Space of Everyday Negotiations: Towards a Rural Social Non-Movement
Sahar Abdelkhalik, Cairo University
Alea iacta est: Psychological Distress and Dishonesty among Syrian Refugees
Elisa Fraile Aranda, Hamburg University
5F Refugeeism and Forced Migration: Transformations in the Middle East and North Africa II
A '9 to 5 Emergency': Time, waiting, and bureaucracy in Jordan's Azraq refugee camp
Melissa Gatter, University of Cambridge
"We Are Serving Our People, We Suffer The Same As They": Cross-Disciplinary Approach To Local Charity And Voluntarism In Irbid Refugee Camp
Salla-Maria Korhonen, University of Helsinki
Gulf Response to the Neighboring Refugee Crises: A Comparative Study
Hirotaka Fujibayashi, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva
27
5G Education, Islam, and Knowledge Production
Engendering Islamic Religious Curriculum in the Schools- Egypt
Hiam Elgousi, HEYA Center for Public Policy, Egypt
Breaking the silence: Listening to voices of Iranian children in five primary classrooms
Monireh Partovi, University of Warwick
Teaching Islamic History in a Decolonial Classroom
Fozia Bora, University of Leeds
Looking for Iranian "Sacred Matter" through the eyes of literature: a case study of "Neveshta" Magazine
Elham Hosnieh, Doshisha University
The Night Ascension of the Imam in the chi'it tradition or the Journey of world sense renewal
Emil Potec, Doctoral School of Theology and Religious Studies, University of Bucharest, Romania
5H Memory, Resistance, and Dissent in Literature
Dimensions of Nation, Memory and Identity in Contemporary Tunisian Poetry
Hanan Natour, Free University Berlin
Transmitting and Transporting Dissent: Taxi Narratives in Cairo and Tehran
Drew Paul, University of Tennessee, Knoxville
Middle Eastern Studies as a Tool of Literary Critique: The Many Lives of A Tale of Two Cities
Ahmed Dardir, Columbia University
The Impact of Post-Naksa on the Memory, and the Conflict between Individual and Collective Memories in the Work of Darwish
Anas Al Humam, University of Manchester
5I Egypt: Politics, Economics, Sociology
"Parasites": Economic growth and social discontent in Egypt during the 1970s and 1980s
Relli Shechter, Ben-Gurion University
Between da'wa and politics: the changing dynamics of Egypt's Ansar al-Sunna, 2011-2013
Neil Russell, Newcastle University
The Petitionary Politics of Everyday Life in Turn-of-the-Century Egypt
Calum Humphreys, University of Cambridge
Outsourcing of Social Welfare Programmes and Islamic Charity in Egypt
Yusuke Kawamura, Kobe University
28
Wednesday 26 June, 11:15 – 13:15
6A Is heritage preservation a zero-sum game? The open-ended, overlapping geographies of the Bedouin
Organised by: Patricia Sellick, Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations, Coventry University // Chair and discussant: Marwan Darweish, Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations, Coventry University
Preserving the living memory of the pastoral routes of the Bedouin in Lebanon
Aphrodite Sorotou, The Institute for Heritage and Sustainable Human Development (York Archaeological Trust)
GROUND TRUTH: Testimonies of dispossession, destruction, and return in the Naqab/Negev
Ariel Caine, Forensic Architecture, Goldsmiths University of London
Contested preservation in the South Hebron Hills: Power, asymmetry and possibility
Patricia Sellick, Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations, Coventry University
Palestinian Bedouins lifestyle a new power-resistance paradigm; South Hebron Hills communities as a case
Mahmoud Soliman, Centre for Trust, Peace and Social Relations, Coventry University
Bedouin Futures? Cultural heritage and sustainable development in Jordan
Carol Palmer, Council for British Research in the Levant (CBRL)
6B Who do we write for? Reflecting on Audiences, Genres and Accountability in contemporary Middle East scholarship
Sponsored by the Arab Council for the Social Sciences (ACSS)
Organised by: Ruba Salih, SOAS - University of London // Discussant: Maha Abdelrahman, University of Cambridge
The burden of “neutrality”: Ethical Dissonance and racialized politics in the neo-liberal university
Ruba Salih, SOAS - University of London
Censorship, self-censorship and research in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) states
Rafeef Ziadah, SOAS - University of London
Social Sciences beyond institutional borders: Public conversations in times of change
Malak Rouchdy, American University of Cairo
For whom do we write?
Khaled Fahmy, University of Cambridge
6C Interdisciplinary Approaches: Security Studies
Securing Palestinian Political Prisoners' Human Rights in an Age of Securitisation
Teodora Todorova, The University of Warwick
29
Starving for Change: The Case of Prison-Based Hunger Strikes in Irish, Israeli and Turkish Prisons (1980-1990)
Malaka Shwaikh, University of Exeter
Armed drones and policing: creating order through the air
Maria-Louise Clausen, Danish Institute for International Studies
"To Secure a Future": Securitisation and the Politics of Movement in Contemporary Arabic Literature
Tasnim Qutait, SOAS - University of London
Transnational Securitisation of Identity: Dissecting the Distinctions between Securitisation and "Othering" of Shias in Bahrain and Pakistan
Maryyum Mehmood, SOAS - University of London and Hasan Hafidh, King’s College London
6D Property Rights and Political Rights in Egypt, Syria, and Turkey (Nineteenth to Twenty-First Centuries)
Organised by: Pascale Ghazaleh, American University in Cairo
Egypt: State / Public / People’s Property
Pascale Ghazaleh, American University in Cairo
State, people, land, and violence in Syria, nineteenth to twenty-first centuries
Seda Altug, Boğaziçi University An Archeology of Today: Tracing the Genealogies of Ezidi Victimhood
Zeynep Turkyilmaz, Forum Transregionale Studien
The State and Governing Madness in Turn-of-the-Century Egypt
Yasmin Shafei, American University of Beirut
6E Turkey: Domestic and International Policies
Victims or Villains: The Representation of Syrian Refugees in the Turkish Policy Debate
Sanam Vaghefi, University of Victoria
Vague promises but no commitment: Barriers to Turkey's normalization of relations with Israel, 1961-1965
Ekavi Athanassopoulou, University of Athens
A re- appraisal of the neoliberal-conservative hegemony in Turkey
Funda Gencoglu, Baskent University
From Mobilizing in Secrecy to an Organization with Secrets: Islamist Collective Action in Early Republican Turkey
Ipek Gencel Sezgin, Baskent University
6F Universities and Youth Activism in the Middle East and North Africa
Emotional dynamics of youth protesters in Post-revolutionary Egypt between openness and cloture of the political structure
Amani El Naggare, University of Munster
30
Youth Social Movements: Mobilization, Ideologies and Change
Ibrahim Natil, Dublin City University
The Politics of Higher Education in East Jerusalem
Adel Ruished, Lancaster University
Student activists in Egyptian private universities: revolution, privilege and the larger student movement
Farah Ramzy, Nanterre University/Lausanne University and Sara Tonsy, Institut d'études politiques Aix, CHERPA
6G Civil War, Sectarianism and Non-State Actors
Chair: Francesco Belcastro, University of Derby
Assessing the Muslim Brotherhood in Libya after 2011
Inga Trauthig, King's College London
The External Determinants of Relations between Same-Sect Political Parties during Civil Wars
Wassim Mroue, University of Edinburgh
Civil wars and foreign fighters. What explains "internationalization"?
Francesco Belcastro, University of Derby
The Forgotten Rupture: Lebanon '82, Anglo-Jewry and the British Political Left
Imogen Resnick, University of Oxford
Transformation of Islamist movements in Syria during the civil war: comparative study of transformation of Ahrar al-Sham, Jaysh al-Islam, and Faylaq al-Sham
Hamzeh Almoustafa, Arab Center for Research and Policy Studies
6H Interdisciplinary Approaches: the GCC
Foodways and Society in Southern Oman
Marielle Risse, Dhofar University
The Omani Experience of Tolerance and Coexistence: Principles and luminous Examples
Al Muatasim Al Maawali, Sultan Qaboos University
The Myth of "the Demise of Arab Nationalism:" Ideas and Political Struggle in Bahrain's Foreign Policy on Gulf Alignment
Hsinyen Lai, University of Edinburgh
Qatar's National Role Conception and Foreign Policy Behaviour Since 1995
Hasan Alhasan, King's College London
6I Session on Academic Publishing
How to write a book proposal and some tips about transforming the thesis into a monograph
Sophie Rudland, I.B. Tauris
The pros and cons of publishing outside of academia for early career scholars
John McManus, The British Institute at Ankara
British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies
31
Zahia Smail Salhi, British Journal of Middle Eastern Studies/University of Manchester
Wednesday 26 June, 13:45 – 15:45
7A DeSectarianisation: Peace Building in the "New Politics of the Middle East"
Organised by: Simon Mabon, Lancaster University
Desectarianisation: Contesting the New Politics of the Middle East
Simon Mabon, Lancaster University
Can Electoral Laws Incentivize De-Sectarianisation?
Bassel Salloukh, Lebanese American University
DeSectarianization and Diplomacy: the view from the Islamic Republic
Edward Wastnidge, The Open University
DeSectarianization and Diplomacy: the view from the Islamic Republic
Samira Nasirzadeh, Lancaster University
The securitisation of the “Masculinist” other in the Syrian conflict
Rahaf Al Doughli, Lancaster University
7B Gender Identity and Masculinity Studies
Nuancing Patriarchy: Jordanian Educated Youth and (Changing?) Notions of Masculinity
Ivana Cosmano, University of Leeds
Masculinity, Heteronormativity, and Subaltern Counterpublics in the Middle East: The Case of Jordan
Ebtihal Mahadeen, University of Edinburgh
Gender, Liminality, & Music in Post-Oslo Palestine
Polly Withers, Middle East Centre, London School of Economics and Political Science
Masculinity in crisis and femininity at risk: from battle of sexes to battle of cultures
Zahra Tizro, York St John University and Farhad Gohardani, Durham University
7C Early Islam Through Interdisciplinarity
Organised by: Hassan Bouali, University of Paris Nanterre, Ludwig Ruault, University of Aix-Marseille & Adam Walker, Radboud University
Zubayrid patrimonialism power in Iraq
Hassan Bouali, University of Paris Nanterre
What’s in an Ism? The names of ʿAbd Allāh ibn Abī Quḥāfa and their Wider Implications
Adam Walker, Radboud University
7D Understanding Tensions in Imagined Territories: An Interdisciplinary Approach
Organised by: Menna Agha, University of Antwerp
Disembodied territoriality, or How to be displaced from where you have never been?
32
Menna Agha, University of Antwerp
Locating the “beautiful age.” Egypt’s cinematic legacy and re-narrating the nation
Iskandar Abdalla, Freie Universitat Berlin
Frames of an Imagined Past: Facebook as an Exhibition
Nermin Elsherif, University of Amsterdam
Framed Geographies: Wartime Beirut between eastern and western imaginaries
John Hanna, TU Delft
7E Reading Colonial Encounters in Palestine: Toward a Decolonial Future
Organised by: Katherine Natanel, University of Exeter
British Women in Mandate Palestine: The “Well-Cared for” Jewish Child and the “Doomed” Arab Infant
Charlotte Kelsted, University of Exeter
Planning Indigeneity: Urban Neoliberal Development and the Imagination of Indigenous Futures Francesco Amoruso, University of Exeter
Affect, excess and settler colonialism in Palestine/Israel
Katherine Natanel, University of Exeter
“No Promotion After Jerusalem”: Ronald Storrs and the case for microhistory
Christopher Burnham, University of Exeter
The plunder of milk and honey: multiple implications of land dispossession in Palestine
Fadia Panosetti, Université Libre de Bruxelles
7F Politics and Society in the Maghreb: Morocco and Algeria
Towards a New Framework for Policy Formulation in Morocco
Salma Refass, Le Desk newspaper
King and shaykhs: Moroccan Diplomacy Through Tijani Network
Lenka Hrabalová, Palacky University
Salafism and the state: Salafi politicisation in Morocco since the 2011 “20 February” popular protests
Guy Eyre, SOAS - University of London
Anticipating a Decolonized Algeria from a Chaoui Perspective
Amira Toureche , University of Exeter
7G Interdisciplinary Approaches to Iran: part I
Painting the General: Qassem Suleimani, Iranian Propaganda and Shi'a Militia Politics
James Worrall, University of Leeds and Alam Saleh, Lancaster University
Ideology and Nuclear Power Politics in Iran - A comparison of the political elite’s discursive practices
Olivia Glombitza, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
The Processes of Navigating Hegemony: Observing US-Iran Diplomacy Through the Lens of Relationality
Hasan Hafidh, King's College London
33
7H Society and Culture of the Ottoman Period
An Early Call for Interdisciplinarity in the Middle East: Kopruluzade Mehmed Fuad's Methodology Writings of the 1910s
Erdem Sonmez, Social Sciences University of Ankara
Kadizadelis and Sufis on Tasawwuf and Reforming Society
Naoki Yamamoto, Ibn Haldun University
Women's Criminality and Women's Imprisonment in the late Ottoman Empire (1840-1919)
Gizem Sivri, Ludwig Maximilians University, Munich
Schneider Efendi: Chief of the Sultan's intelligence service at the Grand Viziership of Tanzimat statesman Mehmed Emin Ali Pasha
Rasim Marz, Ottoman Diplomacy Centre
7I Media, Discourse Analysis and Visual Representations
The Gulf Crisis and its Impact on the Selecting of Television Programs Among Qatari Audiences
Miriam Berg, Northwestern University Qatar
The Truth and Dignity Commission in Tunisian Media: Agenda Setting & Public Opinion
Safa Belghith, University of Tunis al Manar
White-Washed Feminism vs. #WhiteWednesdays: A Social Media Discourse Analysis on the Disconnect Between Western Feminism and the MENA Region
Sara Shaban, University of Missouri
The representation of women in photographs of the First Persian Gulf War
Erica Payet, The Courtauld Institute of Art
7J Clerical Networks, Discourses and the State in Modern Twelver Shi’ism
Organised by: Oliver Scharbrodt, University of Birmingham
Ayatollah Hojjat Kooh-Kamare’i: an assessment of his Contribution to the Modern hawza ‘ilmiyya of Qum
Mohammad Mesbahi, The Islamic College
The Political Impact of the Self During the Islamic Revolution
Christopher Pooya Razavian, University of Birmingham
Modernising clerical authority in Twelver Shiism: consultation (shura), clerics, and the state
Oliver Scharbrodt, University of Birmingham
The political influence of the Najafi Marja’iyya in contemporary Iraq: the role of Friday midday prayer sermons in 2014
Yousif Al-Hilli, University of Birmingham
34
Wednesday 26 June, 16:15 – 18:15
8B Engendering the Islamicate Modern
Organised by: Shareefa Fadhel, University of Leeds
The Hadith of ʿĀ’isha, Gender Justice and Critical Muslim Studies
Sofia Rahman, University of Leeds
John Dewey meets Ataturk: Educational reform of New Republic
Aysa Kotan, University of Leeds
The Politics of Compassion: Muslim Middle Eastern Women as Victim
Walaa AlHusban, University of Leeds
Social Policies and Gender: Localising Global Perspective
Shareefa Fadhel, University of Leeds
8C Towards a new ethnography II: Researcher ethics, positionality and security in the post 2011 Middle East
Organised by: Caitlin Procter, University of Oxford
Doing gender research as a “gendered subject:” challenges and sparks of being a dual-citizen woman researcher in the Islamic Republic of Iran
Rassa Ghaffari, University of Milano-Bicocca
The Politics of Fieldwork: Research challenges and risk in Iran: Coping with shifting red lines and “being there” ― how to navigate a “closed” context
M. Stella Morgana, Leiden University
Rooftop Ecologies: Familial Chaperoning, Social Class Differentials, and Coming-of-age in Anthropology
Noha Fikry, American University in Cairo
De-centring the Archive in the Middle East: Libraries not Archives
Karim Maged Malak, Columbia University
Moving Towards, Moving Beyond: Navigating Execution Chambers
Amira Mahmoud, American University in Cairo
8D Liberation, Authoritarianism and Securitisation: Conceptualising Conflict in Israel/Palestine
The Limits of Securitised Peace: The EU's Sponsorship of Palestinian Authoritarianism
Alaa Tartir, The Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies (IHEID), Geneva, Switzerland
More Important than Other Conflicts: The Uniqueness of the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict in EC/EU Discourse
Anders Persson, Lund University
An exploration of Israeli and Palestinian Conflict Narratives
35
Rosemary Hollis, City, University of London
Palestine as a "Liberation Ideal" in the Gulf
Kanwal Tareq Hameed Abdulhameed, Exeter University
8E Interdisciplinary Approaches to Iran: part II
Iran: Sponsoring or Combating Terrorism?
Zeynab Malakouti, Leeds University
The International Dimension of a German Factory Petag (Persische Teppich-Gesellschaft) in Early Twentieth-Century Iran
Fatemeh Masjedi, Freie Berlin University
Khomeini and avoiding sectarian language: Iran-Iraq war (1980-1988) as a case study
Meysam Tayebipour, Lancaster University
Who Is Radical in Iran? Problems of Translation and Attribution of Western Labels
Giorgia Perletta, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan
8F Twenty-First Century Iraq
An inter-disciplinary post-war recovery strategy to counter the ISIS insurgency in Iraq
Jacob Eriksson, University of York
The Political Economy of Women's Peacebuilding in Post-2003 Iraq
Yasmin Chilmeran, Monash University
A Quantitative Study on Foreign Aid and Violence in Iraq
Tabitha Poulter, City, University of London
Moral philosophy and understanding forced migration in occupied Iraq
Ali Ali, University of Oxford
8G Philosophy & Cultural Heritage
Cultural Heritage Tolerance and Islam: A Discussion of the Quranic Texts, Hadith and Selected Historical Case Studies
Alena Westover, Brandenburg University of Technology
A Consideration over the Best Selling of La Tahzan: Focusing on the Role of Preachers which Changes with the Times
Megumi Kenjo, Keio University
Grammar and logic in the Epistles of the Brethren of Purity. An inquiry to the problem of interdisciplinarity in Classical Arabic Philosophy
Crina Galita, University of Bucharest
― End of conference ―

=================================================


Should we vote for a boycott?
British academics debate whether to break links with universities and colleges in Israel
John Chalcraft

Wed 30 May 2007 00.02 BST
Yes 
John Chalcraft: An international, non-violent movement supporting divestment, sanctions and boycott of Israel is gathering strength. The question for British academics is whether they too should refuse to do business as usual with Israeli academic institutions. At stake is not the boycott of individual Israelis, nor some political test, but the withdrawal of institutional collaboration - in relation to funding, visits, conferences, joint publication and the like - with Israeli universities.
Academics will be unimpressed by the erroneous claim that Israeli universities have seriously opposed Israeli violations. No Israeli academic institution has ever taken a public stand against Israel's 40-year military occupation. On the contrary, the Israeli academy has long provided intellectual, linguistic, logistical, technical, scientific and human support for an occupation in direct violation of international law.

Moreover, Israeli universities have never seriously opposed the infrastructural degradation of Palestinian education, the killing and injuring of students, or the checkpoints, border controls, land seizure and the illegal separation wall, which heavily restrict Palestinian academic and educational activity.

The movement for boycott is in no way anti-semitic. It includes Jews and non-Jews, and stands against racist prejudice of all kinds. The boycott is motivated by opposition to systematic discrimination.

More challenging is the argument that the boycott is counterproductive, compared to dialogue and collaboration. The example of South Africa, however, teaches otherwise. The international boycott movement had a tremendous impact in breaking down apartheid. Crucially, Israel now, like South Africa then, considers itself part of the west. When western civil society says enough is enough, Israelis, not to mention western governments, will take notice.

Is it unfair to single Israel out? It is not clear that there are other heavily militarised, nuclear-armed, expansionist apartheid states with extensive illegal settlement, land seizure and wall-building activity. There are certainly other violators of international law, and the case for boycotting each must be made on its merits. That does not weaken the case for a nonviolent, international movement regarding Israel. To say that it does is simply special pleading.

As for academic freedom, it should be remembered that the situation has long involved the denial of Palestinians' academic freedom. The point of the boycott, which will certainly involve forms of institutional disruption, is to end this vicious discrimination and the massive and structural violation of academic freedom involved. The boycott, moreover, will encourage and give protection to Israeli academics critical of academic complicity and occupation, and stands in solidarity with Palestinians whose freedoms have long been repressed.

· John Chalcraft is a lecturer on government at the London School of Economics

================================================


Israel's Bankrupt Politics
by John Chalcraft
First Posted: 09-04-09 12:05 AM   |   Updated: 04-16-12 06:40 PM

To this historian of empire, the Israeli onslaught on the captive Palestinians of Gaza strikingly recalls the tactics of colonial counterinsurgency, as recent research by Laleh Khalili at SOAS underlines. Attempting to crush nationalist resistance, the British surrounded civilian populations with barbed wire during the Southern African War, 1899-1902. Aiming to destroy Algerian nationalism, the French moved hundreds of thousands of Algerian civilians into ‘centres de regroupement’ in the late 1950s. And the United States’ war against the Vietnamese made substantial use of ‘strategic hamlets’ in the 1960s.

      In each instance, a militarily stronger colonial power fought, in the name of ‘civilization’, an armed, nationalist resistance accused of terrorism. In each case, the stronger power sought the total physical encirclement of a largely civilian population in order to sever links between guerrillas and civilians, to cut off the flow of arms, and to control supplies of food, water, and medicine. In each case, scorched earth policies intensified civilian dependency by destroying access to means of subsistence. And although Britain, France and the US did not build the death camps seen in Nazi Germany, their tactics resulted in the deaths of many thousands of civilians, and provoked protests in the metropole. In each case, finally, particular military victories were won, while the larger political war against nationalism was lost.

      Israel is not a major imperial power, but it is a settler society adopting the colonial languages of cultural superiority, and based on the expulsion and dispossession of the indigenous Palestinian-Arab population, whose nationalist resistance is often called terrorism. Israel’s genesis owes mightily to British imperial sponsorship after 1917, and its ongoing policies of occupation and settlement are unthinkable without US support, above all since the 1960s.

      Israel’s constant aim has been to destroy Palestinian nationalism. During 1991-2001, the Israelis attempted to negotiate the Palestinians into disconnected, de-militarized, self-governing enclaves with Israeli-controlled water, airspace, borders, security, and foreign policy. During this period the Israelis accelerated settlement and land confiscation, and offered only token gestures on Jerusalem and the Palestinian right of return. After 1993 this was called the Oslo Process. The attempt did not succeed because it failed to offer the Palestinians the national rights they craved.

      Since Israel walked away from the Taba negotiations in January 2001, the occupying power has resorted to unilateralism, cooptation, and force. In Gaza, the Hamas government has no intention of giving up Palestinian national rights, and the Israelis know this. For this reason, Gaza now resembles an open-air prison: physically encircled in order to crush armed resistance, stop the flow of arms, and control the flow of food, water and medicine to civilians. Expulsion and property seizure, particularly in 1948-9 and 1967, and the de-development of Gaza under occupation, and the bombing of factories, schools, and so on, have intensified the dependency of the civilian population. Recently we have witnessed the deaths and injuries of thousands of civilians in Gaza at the hands of Israeli military, along with significant protest, drawing strength from media coverage of the carnage. As in the colonial examples, Israeli policies continue to fail in their primary objective (destroying Palestinian nationalism). Nonetheless, Israeli public opinion lurches further to the right, voting in large numbers for politicians who think imprisonment too good for Palestinians.

      While even humanitarian gestures on behalf of Palestinians are controversial (at least at the BBC and Sky), and while even universities find it impossible to state publicly their support for the Palestinian right to education, or to condemn the siege and destruction of Palestinian universities and schools, it is, nonetheless, more than ever important to underline that the fundamental problem is not humanitarian, but political. Without a two- or one-state solution, or, without more than tokenism on Jerusalem and refugees, an end to settlements, occupation, enclave politics, and the deadly open-air prison of Gaza, there will be no just, comprehensive and lasting peace. This means enduring instability in the region and beyond.

      Given the failures of diplomacy, it should be no surprise that since the early 2000s, the campaign for Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) against Israel, modelled on the transnational movement which helped to bring down Apartheid in South Africa, has been gathering strength. Its central message is clear: there can be no business-as-usual with Israel until it respects Palestinian national rights. Whether the present campaign will be as successful as its model remains to be seen. But it would be hasty to dismiss the power of institutional disruption in regards to a relatively small country such as Israel, undertaken by those who Israel considers to be its ‘natural partners’ in the West, open to anyone having any dealings with Israeli institutions, businesses and products, involving a non-violent effort to expose the political and moral bankruptcy of the Israeli position, and fundamentally correct in its support for Palestinian national rights.

===========================================


https://www.facebook.com/nicola.pratt.9484/posts/10156132509306502
 

Nicola Pratt

24 June at 22:30 ·

The British Society for Middle Eastern Studies made history today by being the 1st UK scholarly society to vote to endorse the academic boycott of Israeli universities until they end their complicity with the occupation and violations of Palestinian human rights. It’s so rare that I’m on the winning side that I can’t believe this has happened


Comments

Mona Radwan

Mona Radwan Great work


 ·    · 1w

Ann Farr

Ann Farr Well done.


 ·    · 1w

Islah Jad

Islah Jad Bravo my dearest such a great effort and a great victory


 ·    · 1w

Paola Rivetti

Paola Rivetti YEES!!!


 ·    · 1w

Ajay Parasram

Ajay Parasram That's amazing!


 ·    · 1w

Marwa Arafa

Marwa Arafa Make the post public! Yay! ❤❤❤


 ·    · 1w

Nicola Pratt

Nicola Pratt Marwa Arafa done

 ·    · 6d

Gülçin Erdi

Gülçin Erdi Amazing !


 ·    · 1w

Mona Elnamoury

Mona Elnamoury Great!


 ·    · 1w

Jane Nellist

Jane Nellist Stay strong


 ·    · 1w

Yara Hawari

Yara Hawari Mabrook mabrook mabrook! Celebrate these wins!


 ·    · 1w

Atef Botros Al-Attar

Atef Botros Al-Attar great


 ·    · 1w

Chris Rossdale

Chris Rossdale This is fantastic news, well done Nicola!


 ·    · 1w

Nevine El Nossery

Nevine El Nossery Excellent job!

1

 ·    · 1w

Ronit Lentin

Ronit Lentin Mabrouk comrades!! Shukran


 ·    · See translation · 1w

Sherene Seikaly

Sherene Seikaly amazing. lead us!


 ·    · 1w

Nicola Pratt

Nicola Pratt Sherene Seikaly MESA next I hope


 ·    · 6d

Gennaro Gervasio

Gennaro Gervasio yesssssss!


 ·    · 1w

Lisa Tilley

Lisa Tilley Well done friend! Incredible and inspiring as always! 💚


 ·    · 1w

Iman Hamam

Iman Hamam

👏👏


 ·    · 1w

Magid Shihade

Magid Shihade 👏👏👏👏


 ·    · 1w

Hoda Elsadda

Hoda Elsadda Well done and congratulations to all of us


 ·    · 6d

Laleh Khalili

Laleh Khalili Thank you for ALL your work all the way up to the last minute!!


 ·    · 6d

Jou Ka

Jou Ka Well done Nicola!!!!👏👏👏👏👏. This is huge!!


 ·    · 6d

Erika Biagini

Erika Biagini Thanks to you Nicola and our amazing colleagues for never giving up the fight! 🎉


 ·    · 6d

وفاء المصرى

وفاء المصرى  


 ·    · 6d

Afaf Jabiri

Afaf Jabiri Great news!!


 ·    · 6d

Katie Natanel

Katie Natanel Job so well done, Nicola. Thank you all for driving this!!! It feels huge...


 ·    · 6d

Miriyam Assfar

Miriyam Assfar amazing thank you for fighting the fight, for your patience and careful preparations and endurance and winning this for all of us


 ·    · 6d

Dalia Said Mostafa

Dalia Said Mostafa Victory 👏👏👏 a big thank you Nicola and to all colleagues who worked so hard to get this accomplished 🌺🌺🌺


 ·    · 6d

Jessica Winegar

Jessica Winegar Yes!!!! Wonderful news!!!


 ·    · 6d

Katharina Lenner

Katharina Lenner Jason Hart

 ·    · 6d



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